Timeline for Glenarb, parish of Aghaloo, county Tyrone

Notes:

  • PRONI = Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, Belfast.
  • VM = Vestry Minutes.
  • This timeline is a work-in-progress.
  • Please cite your sources.

9th century: The Martyrology of Tamhlacht, an Irish calendar, recorded the annual commemoration of the Meic Guaslaingi ó Cluainairb, "The Sons of gUa Slaingi, of Cluain-airbh," taking place on the 17th May. Source: Graves, James. "Tynan and its Crosses. Clonarb and its Crosses." The Journal of the Royal Historical and Archæological Association of Ireland. Vol. VI, fourth series (1883-1884). Dublin: Ponsonby and Weldrick, 1884, pp. 413ff.

c.1167: The metrical calendar of Marian Gorman was compiled, which also recorded the Meic Guaslaingi ó Cluainairb, "The Sons of gUa Slaingi, of Cluain-airbh," taking place on the 17th May. Source: Graves, "Clonarb and its Crosses," op. cit.

1455-08-16: John O'Connally, sacristan, obtained a pension out of Clonarb and other lands. Source: The Ancient Churches of Armagh, by William Reeves (Lusk, 1860), pg. 29.

1537: At its dissolution, the abbey of Ss. Peter and Paul, of Armagh, was seized of several pieces of land, including those at Clonarb. Source: Graves, "Clonarb and its Crosses," op. cit.

1539: By an inquisition taken this year, the Abbot, Patrick O'Hagan, was found to be have been seized of several pieces of land, as described in the entry for the year, 1537, above. Source: Monasticon Hibernicum: or, An History of the Abbeys, Priories, and Other Religious Houses in Ireland, by Mervyn Archdall. Vol. I. (Dublin: Kelly, 1873), pg. 44.

1562-11-01: By an Inquisition held at Armagh in 1614, it was found that James O'Donnelly, the last Abbot, had been seized "of the parcels of land called Clonarb, Lisedercloen, Keimmore, Aghakip, and Knockore, all of which are generally know by the name of the Grange of Clonorbe." Source: Graves, "Clonarb and its Crosses," op. cit.

1605-06-12: Letters patent were confirmed to Sir Henry Oge O'Neale, of Drommorrey, county Tyrone, Knight, "the entire country or territory nown by the name of 'Henry Oge his countrie,' excepting all spiritual and ecclesiastical rights and possessions. The Grange of Clonarbe, on the west side of the river Blackwater, was included in this exception, belonging as it did to the Abbey of Saints Peter and Paul of Armagh. Source: Reeves, William. "The History of Tynan Parish." Ulster Journal of Archæology. Vol. VII. Belfast: M'Caw, Stevenson & Orr, Limited, The Linenhall Press, 1901, pg. 47.

1609-12-01: King James I granted Clonarb, along with other possessions of the Abbey of Ss Peter and Paul, to Sir John Davys, the Attorney-General for Ireland. Source: Reeves, op. cit.

1611-01-28: As reward for his services as a servitor in the undertaking of the Plantation of Ulster, Sir Toby Caulfeild received a grant of one thousand acres in the barony of Dungannon. Sources: (1) Prendergast, John P. Paper read at the proceedings of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, in connexion with Charlemont Fort and Sir Toby Caulfeild, 6th August 1884. (2) Journal of the Society of the Royal and Archæological Association of Ireland, Vol. VI (1884), op. cit. (3) "The Caulfeilds." The Spectator. No. 1976. May 12, 1866.

1612-05-22: The lands of the Abbey of Ss Peter and Paul (including Glenarb) were regranted, from Sir John Davys, to Sir Toby Caulfeild. This grant was "confirmed and enlarged by subsequent patents, 24th July, 1618, and 27th February, 1622." Source: Reeves, op. cit.

1620-12-22: Sir Toby Caulfeild was created Baron (Lord) Charlemont.
Source: Burke, Bernard. A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Peerage and Baronetage, &c. Vol. XLII, Part 1. London: Harrison, 1880.

1627-08-17: Death of Sir Toby Caulfeild. Source: Journal of the Society of the Royal and Archæological Association of Ireland, Vol. VI (1884), op. cit.

1654-6: The Civil Survey enumerated Lord Calfield [Caulfeild], English, Protestant, as the proprietor of Clunarbe (one ballibo), containing sixty "Ackers"—59 "Arrable," and 1 Pasture. The "Value of ye whole and each ye sd Lands in ye yeare 1640" was 62:00:00. Source: The Civil Survey A.D. 1654-1656. Counties of Donegal, Londonderry and Tyrone. Vol. III. by Robert C. Simington, of the Quit Rent Office. Dublin: Stationery Office, 1937.

1666: James Gillaspy and William Gillaspy, of Clownearbb, parish of Augelowe, were listed in the Hearth Money rolls for the barony of Dungannon. Source: Ó Doibhlin, Diarmaid. "Hearth Money and Subsidy Rolls of the Barony of Dungannon, 1666." Seanchas Ardmhacha: Journal of the Diocesan Historical Society. Vol. VI, No. 1 (1971), pg. 34.

1689: The government of King James II passed "An Act for the Attainder of divers Rebels, and for preserving the Interest of Loyal Subjects." Included in the very long list of persons thus found to have been guilty of treason were Henry Maxwell, Gent., Glenarb, and James Maxwell, Gent., Glenarb. Others in the parish of Aghaloo, similarly adjudged, included John Hamilton of Callidon, Esq.; Alexander Woods of Kinard, Gent.; John Lowry of Aghiennis, Gent.; John Lowry, jun., do., do.; George Hamilton of Callidon, Gent.; John Speer of Mullaghmossagh; John Speer of Kinard; and, Margaret Hamilton of Callidon, Widow. Source: "A List of those attainted by King James II. in his Parliament held in Dublin, 1689, belonging to the Counties of Fermanagh and Tyrone, as given by Dr. William King, Dean of St. Patrick's, in the Appendix to his work on the State of the Protestants of Ireland, &c. Dublin, A.D. 1713." Parliamentary Memoirs of Fermanagh and Tyrone, from 1613 to 1885, by the Earl of Belmore. Dublin: Alex. Thom & Co., 1887 (pp. 365-6).

1702-12-28: V.M. – Under order of the High Constable of the Barony of Dungannon, 186 trees were to be planted in the parish of Aghalow, of "oak, ash, elm, and firre." Three such trees were allotted to Glenarb townland.
Source: Marshall, John J., ed. Vestry Book of the Parish of Aghalow (Caledon, Co. Tyrone), with an Account of the Family of Hamilton of Caledon, 1691–1807. Dungannon: The Tyrone Printing Co. Ltd., 1935.

1718-04-14: V.M. – John Huggins, of Glenarb, was elected one of three sidesmen for the parish church of Aghalow (Church of Ireland) in Caledon. Source: Marshall, John J., ed. Vestry Book of the Parish of Aghalow, op. cit.
Note: The Vestry not only managed administrative matters pertaining to the parish church, but also affairs which are generally considered within the mandate of a municipal governmental today, such as approving expenditures for: overseeing new roads within the parish; building a new school house, and subsequent repairs; applotting Captain Hamilton's estate and the rest of the parish; nursing of foundlings; relief of the poor; appointing constables to collect cess; etc. etc.

1719-03-30: V.M. – John Huggins, of Glenarb, was elected one of two sidesmen for the Caledon side [estate] of the parish of Aghalow. Source: Marshall, John J., ed. Vestry Book of the Parish of Aghalow, op. cit. Note: Sidesmen were elected also for the Ballymagrane estate and the town of Caledon.

1723-01-17: Memorial no. 40-215-25153 – the marriage settlement for the Hon. James Caulfeild, Esq., eldest son and heir apparent of William, Lord Viscount Charlemont, with Elizabeth, daughter of Francis Bernard, sen., of Dublin. Glenarb townland was listed as one of the lands held by the Viscount. Source: Registry of Deeds, Ireland. Memorial no. 40-215-25153, Lord Viscount Charlemont to Rev. Dr. Travers and others (dated 17 Jan 1723, reg'rd 21 Jan 1723). Copy per FHL film no. 522812. Indexed by Alison Kilpatrick, and index entries submitted to www.irishdeedsindex.net, 2017-05-16.

1731-08-30: Memorial of a lease from Lord Charlemont to John Huggins, whereby the Right Honorable Lord Viscount Charlemont did demise, &c. to Farm and let, to John Huggins, that part of the Town Land of Glenorbe then in his possession containing 80 Acres English measure, to hold for thirty-one years at the yearly rent of £23, with sixpence per pound Receiver's fees. Source: Registry of Deeds, Ireland. Lord Charlemont to Huggins. Memorial no. 79-503-57084, registered 14 November 1735. Copy on microfilm at the PRONI, Belfast, ref. MIC/311/50. Extracted by Alison Kilpatrick.

c.1741: Death of John Huggins, the first of this name to reside in Glenarb townland. Source: Memorial of a Deed between McCall and another, to Huggins, to McCall and another. Registry of Deeds, Dublin. No. 87797, dated 23 Feb 1747.

1747-09-30: V.M. – John Huggins, of Glenarb, was elected to the Vestry of the parish of Aghalow. Source: Marshall, John J., ed. Vestry Book of the Parish of Aghalow, op. cit.

1756: Death of John Huggins, the second of this name to reside in Glenarb townland. Source: Lease set to John Higgins [sic], dated 1st May 1735. Lease book for the Caledon estate, 1735–1770s. Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, Belfast. PRONI ref. D2433/A/5/3.

1756–57: The potato crop failed, and "great numbers throughout the country are said to have perished by famine." Source: Marshall, John J., ed. Vestry Book of the Parish of Aghalow, op. cit.

1757-12-21: V.M. – Fever was raging in the country. Source: Marshall, John J., ed. Vestry Book of the Parish of Aghalow, op. cit.

1762-07-30: Lease no. 1, Lord Charlemont to Lettice and John Huggins, of the lands of Glenorbe, for three lives, 79 acres 3 roods 10 perches, English measure. Lease no. 2, Lord Charlemont to Lettice and John Huggins, lease of part of Glenorbe for three lives, 79 acres 3 roods 10 perches, English measure. Rent £40, receiver's fees £2, duty work 4 shillings, Total £42 4 shillings. Source: Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, Belfast. Lord Charlemont to Huggins. PRONI ref. D2433/A/45/1 & /2, dated 30 July 1762. Extracted by Alison Kilpatrick, November 2003. Note: These leases are repeated in PRONI refs. D2433/A/1/45/1 and /2, and D2433/A/1/695/5.

1766-12-01: Copy lease for a year. Rent 1 peppercorn. James, Earl of Charlemont to John Stronge. Clanticlevan, Killnacart and Glenarb, Co. Tyrone. Source: PRONI D2433/A/1/45/3.

1766-12-20: Copy deed of conveyance Consideration £5018.10.0 James Earl of Charlemont to John Stronge, Gent. Clanticlevan, Killnacart and Glenarb in the Manor of Castlecaulfield in the Co. Tyrone. Source: PRONI D2433/A/1/45/4.

1768-10-28: V.M. – John Huggins, of Glenarb, was elected to the Vestry of the parish of Aghalow. Source: Marshall, John J., ed. Vestry Book of the Parish of Aghalow, op. cit.

1769-04-10: V.M. – John Huggins, of Glenarb, was elected to the Vestry of the parish of Aghalow. Source: Marshall, John J., ed. Vestry Book of the Parish of Aghalow, op. cit.

1770-08-15: Counterpart lease for 3 lives Rent £11.9.3. Recvs fees 11/5 duties 2/-. John Stronge to Arthur Fair. Part of the townland of Glenarb 24A 19P stat. measure. Source: PRONI D2433/A/1/45/5.

1775-04-18: V.M. – John Huggins, of Glenarb, was elected to the Vestry of the parish of Aghalow. Source: Marshall, John J., ed. Vestry Book of the Parish of Aghalow, op. cit.

1778-04-21: V.M. – John Huggins, of Glenarb, was elected to the Vestry of the parish of Aghalow. Source: Marshall, John J., ed. Vestry Book of the Parish of Aghalow, op. cit.

1780-09-07: V.M. – John Huggins, of Glenarb, and Robert Henderson were appointed overseers of bye-roads for Dyan division. Source: Marshall, John J., ed. Vestry Book of the Parish of Aghalow, op. cit.

1782-11-07: V.M. – Applotments for repairing bye roads were confirmed for the parish of Aghalow, including:—John Huggins, 10 perches in Tullyshane and Glenarb at 5 shillings a perch ... £2 10s 0d. Source: Marshall, John J., ed. Vestry Book of the Parish of Aghalow, op. cit.

1784-10-27: John Huggins, of Glenarb, was elected to the Vestry for the parish of Aghalow. Source: Marshall, John J., ed. Vestry Book of the Parish of Aghalow, op. cit.

1783-11-04: V.M. – Applotments [for repairing bye roads] were confirmed for the parish of Aghalow, including—Jn. Huggin [sic], Tullynashane to Glenarb, 8 [perches] at 4 shillings a perch ... £1 12s 0d. Source: Marshall, John J., ed. Vestry Book of the Parish of Aghalow, op. cit.

1784-11-04: V.M. – Applotments [for repairing] Bye Roads were confirmed for the parish of Aghalow, including—6 feet wide, gravel or stones. ... 23. John Huggins, road to Glenarb, 5 [perches] at 4 shillings sixpence a perch ... £1 2s 6d. Source: Marshall, John J., ed. Vestry Book of the Parish of Aghalow, op. cit.

1786-04-18: John Huggins, of Glenarb, was elected to the Vestry for the parish of Aghalow. Source: Marshall, John J., ed. Vestry Book of the Parish of Aghalow, op. cit.

1795-07: Death of John Huggins, the third of this name to reside in Glenarb townland. Source: Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, Belfast. Copy will of John Huggins, Glenarb, parish of Aghalow, county Tyrone, dated 28th July 1795. PRONI ref. D889/1/41B.

1796-07-18: Indenture made 18 July 1796 between John Stronge Esqre of Liverpool and Jane Huggins of Glenorb, Widow. Lands of Glenorb. Mentions Mill Dams and Mill Seats. Also agreed that the said Jean [sic] Huggins, her heirs and assigns are to do suit and service at the Marnstomed[?] Courts Leet and Courts Barron [Baron]. From 1st November last, during natural Lives of Andrew Thomas Lord Blayney and the Hon. Dupré Alexander Son to the present Lord Calledon, or during the life of the longest liver of them. Lease for 21 years or during the natural lives [etc., as aforesaid]. Part of Glenarb, 79A 3R 2P. Yearly rent of £1 2s 10d by the Acre for every Acre rood and perch. Receivers fees 6d per £. Source: Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, Belfast. Lord Charlemont to Huggins. PRONI ref. D2433/A/45/6, dated 18 July 1796. Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, November 2003. Note: This lease is repeated in PRONI ref. D2433/A/1/695/5.

1797-07-22: Death of Lettice, widow of John Huggins (c.1715–1756), Glenarb. Source: The Belfast News-Letter, 31 July 1797. Death notice for Lettice Huggins.

1798-07-07: The O'Neills were "driven from their ancient home in the townland of Glenarb, near Caledon, on the banks of the Blackwater. Their house was burned during a party disturbance, when religious animosity ran high in the district, and a favourite instrument of the bard's [that is, Arthur O'Neill's] was lost in the conflagration, and never forgotten by the peasantry when telling of the wrecking of the O'Neills of Glenarb." Source: Bigger, Francis Joseph. "Arthur O'Neill, the Irish Harper." Ulster Journal of Archæology. Vol. VII. Belfast: M'Caw, Stevenson & Orr, Limited, The Linenhall Press, 1901, pp. 6–7. Italicized portion citing Patrick Mallon (1871).
   The details of this tragedy were outlined in considerable detail by Reamonn Ó Muirí in his scholarly article entitled, "A 1798 Court Martial, with reference to Arthur O'Neill, harper," in the journal, Seanchas Ard Mhacha (Vol. XII, No. 2, 1987). Arthur O'Neill's brother, Ferdinand, lived in Glenarb townland. After the rising of the United Irishmen, the local yeomanry raided Ferdinand O'Neill's house on the pretext that he had been involved in the incidents at Toome, in the county Antrim. En route to Mr. O'Neill's house, the corps enquired, first, at Mr. Huggans' [sic] house, then at that of Best Fair. Upon the arrival of the corps at the house of Ferdinand O'Neill, a scuffle ensued, shots were fired, and the house was set on fire, in which blaze, Mrs. O'Neill died. Ferdinand O'Neill prosecuted Lieut. William Hunter, of the Moy corps of yeomanry with the murder of his wife and the destruction of his house. In fine, the Court Martial found that the charge was not proved, and acquitted Lieut. Hunter.

1800-03-03: Lease for 21 years or 2 lives. Rent £20 sterling yearly. Rev. James Stronge to Ferdinand O'Neill. Part of Glenarb in the parish of Aghaloo, Co. Tyrone. Source: PRONI D2433/A/1/45/7.

1812-04-22: John Huggins and others entered into a Deed of Assignment in Trust with Best Fair. Source: Armagh Guardian, 10 May 1867. "Landed Estates Court, Ireland." (William Huggins, executor of James Huggins, deceased.) Online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.british-newspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-12-02). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

1814: In the Directory to the Market Towns, Villages, Gentlemen's Seats, and Other Noted Places in Ireland, was listed: "Name of place: Glen-arb; County: Tyrone; Post Town: Caledon; Resident or Description: Mr. John Huggins." Source: Title as stated, 2nd ed., compiled by Ambrose Leet. Dublin: Brett Smith, 1814.

1814-09-22: Last will and testament of Ferdinand O'Neill, late of Glenarb in parish of Aghaloo, Co. Tyrone. Source: PRONI D2433/A/1/45/10.

1815: 'A survey of Glenarb, the property of Sir James Matthew Stronge, Bt, by William Armstrong, 1815.' Source: PRONI D2433/A/13/9.

1816-11: Death of Arthur O'Neill, the renowned Irish harper, at Maydown, county Armagh. Source: Bigger, Francis Joseph. "Arthur O'Neill, the Irish Harper," op. cit. Note: O'Neill was a near relative of the O'Neills of Glenarb.

1820: Ten renewal leases from Francis Lord Kilmorey to various tenants, regarding premises in High Street. Included are two renewal leases to a "Best Fair, gentleman, of Glenarb, in the county of Tyrone." Source: PRONI D2638/B/31.

1821-08-09: Copy deed of mortgage. Sir James Matthews Stronge, Bt 1st part, Hugh Harris Esq, 2nd part, George Lendrum, 3rd part. Clanticlevan, Killnacart and Glenarb, Co. Tyrone. Source: PRONI D2433/A/1/45/11.

1828-05-05: First annual ploughing match of the Tynan branch of the North East Farming Society. Mr. Best Fair, of Glenarb, was one of the judges, and gave a short address at the farmers' dinner. Source: Belfast News-Letter, 11 March 1828. "Tynan Branch of the North East Farming Society." Digital copy online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.british-newspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-17, by subscription). Click on link to view transcription.

1829-11-01: Lease for 1 life or 21 years. Rent £63.0.9. Sir James Stronge, Bt, to Valentine Best Fair of Glenarb. Part of the lands of Glenarb 51A 21P stat. measure. Sources: PRONI D2433/A/1/45/12 and /13.

1826: Death of Jane (or Jean) Huggins née Thompson, widow of John Huggins (c.1740-1795), Glenarb. Source: Gravestone inscription, Caledon churchyard.

1829-11-01: Lease for 1 life or 21 years. Rent £63.0.9. Sir James Stronge, Bt, to Valentine Best Fair of Glenarb. Part of the lands of Glenarb 51A 21P stat. Source: PRONI D2433/A/1/45/12 and /13.

1832-08-28: Observations on behalf of the Earl of Caledon on the abstract of title to the lands of Glenarb in Co. Tyrone, agreed to be sold him by Sir James Matthew Stronge, Bt. Source: PRONI D2433/A/1/45/16.

1833-04-13: Mortgage as an indemnity against incumbrances. Sir James Matthew Stronge, Bt 1st part, William John Alexander Esq, 2nd part, the Rt. Hon. Dupre Earl of Caledon 3rd part. Glenarb and other lands in Co. Tyrone and Lecke Co. Monaghan. Source: PRONI D2433/A/1/45/66.

1833-08-27: Copy case on behalf of Mr Lendrum, with Mr Warren's opinion and draft deed of disclaimer. Sir James Stronge and others to the Earl of Caledon. Lands of Glenarb. Source: PRONI D2433/A/1/45/67.

1836-01-07: The Townland Valuation was completed for Glenarb. Six land holdings were enumerated and described. Soils ranged from cold clay to sandy and loamy arable, convenient or inconvenient as to raods, arable to meadow, some of the land liable to flooding from the river Blackwater. Only houses with an annual value of £3 or more were listed. In Glenarb townland, James Huggans' [sic] house was valued at £6 5s. Source: Townland Valuation: Glenarb, Parish of Aghaloo, Barony of Dungannon Lower, 7th January 1836. PRONI ref. VAL/1/B/66B. Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (Belfast).

1838-01-01: Lease for 1 life or 21 years Rent £63 plus receivers fees yearly. Earl of Caledon to James Campbell, shopkeeper, of Caledon. Farm of land in Glenarb 52A 1R 36P statute measure. Sources: (a) PRONI D2433/A/1/45/68, and (b) PRONI D2433/A/1/535.

c.1840: Sir James Stronge removed a high cross from Glenarb, and installed on a small island in a lake on his demesne, Tynan Abbey. This cross came to be known as the Island Cross. Source: Graves, "Clonarb and its Crosses," op. cit.

c.1840?: Sir James Stronge removed a second cross from Glenarb, placing it on an arch over a well, beside the avenue on his demesne, Tynan Abbey. This cross came to be known as the Well Cross. Source: Graves, "Clonarb and its Crosses," op. cit.

1845-06-28: The judges of the Caledon Farming Society inspected clover crops entered for competion, with the following placements earned by representatives of Glenarb townland: 1st in clover crops, Mr. David Wilkin; and, farmers below 20 acres, Mr. Thomas Ritchie. Source: Belfast Protestant Journal, 28 June 1845. "Caledon Farming Society." Digital copy online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-17, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick. Click on link to view transcription.

1845-08-25: At the Caledon Farming Society's annual cattle show took place in the fair green of Caledon. The following premiums were won by farmers from Glenarb townland: Brood mares, 1st, Mr. Higgins [sic]; Year-old colts or fillies, 1st, Mr. Huggins; Butter, 5th, Mr. Thomas Ritchie. Source: Northern Whig, 30 August 1845. "Caledon Farming Society's Cattle Show." Digital copy online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-18, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick. Click on link to view transcription.

1845-11-15: The annual dinner of the Caledon Estate Farming Society took place in Keenan's Hotel, Caledon. The following gentlement were in attendance, from Glenarb townland: James Huggins, Esq., and Mr. David Wilkin. Source: The Armagh Guardian, 30 June 1846. "Caledon Estate Farming Society." Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick. Click on link to view transcription.

1846-06-15: The annual show of clover and grasses of the Caledon Estates Farming Society took place. The judges gave awards for crops grown on more than twenty acres (1st class) or less than twenty acres (2nd class). Mr. James Huggins, of Glenarb, placed 3rd in the first category. Source: The Armagh Guardian, 30 June 1846. "Caledon Estates Farming Society." Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick. Click on link to view transcription.

1846-12-15: The highest cess-payers in the Lower Barony of Dungannon were notified to attend court at Aughnacloy, for the purpose of electing six of their number previous to Lent Assizes, 1847. David Wilkin, of Glenarb, was on the list of cess-payers. Source: Tyrone Constitution, 30 October 1846. "County Tyrone Presentment Sessions." Digital copy online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaper-archive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-17, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick. Click on link to view transcription. 

1846-12-04: At the November meeting of the Caledon Estates Farming Society, Mr. David Wilkin, of Glenarb, placed 4th, in the category of best of acre of wheat, and 2nd for best acre of turnips (1st class). Mr. James Huggins won 1st for the best two-year-old colt or filly bred by exhibitor, and 3rd for the best year-old colt or filly bred by exhibitor. Source: Tyrone Constitution, 4 December 1846. "Caledon Estates Farming Society." Digital copy online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaper-archive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-19, by subscription). Extracted by Alison Kilpatrick. Click on link to view transcription.

1848-07-28: Warrant of attorney. Sir James Stronge Bt to the Right Hon. James Earl of Caledon. Lands called Glenarb, Co. Tyrone and Lecke, Co. Monaghan. PRONI ref. D2433/A/1/45/70. Also: Bond of indemnity; PRONI ref. D2433/A/1/45/69.

1848-12-12: The highest cess-payers in the Lower Barony of Dungannon were notified to attend court at Aughnacloy, for the purpose of electing six of their number previous to Lent Assizes, 1849. David Wilkin, of Glenarb, was on the list of cess-payers. Source: Tyrone Constitution, 3 November 1848. "County Tyrone Presentment Sessions." Digital copy online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaper-archive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-17, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick. Click on link to view transcription. 

1849-03-14: A sweepstakes ploughing match was held on the lands of Mr. Edward Magee, Glenarb, in consequence of some of the farmers being dissatisfied with the awards made by the judges during the Caledon Farming Society's recent ploughing match. "On the whole, the day being fine, every person appeared satisfied with the amusement." Source: The Armagh Guardian, 26 March 1849. "Sweepstakes Ploughing Match." Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick. Click on link to view transcription.

1849: Death of Jane Eliza Huggins, wife of James Huggins, Esq., of Glenarb. Source: Gravestone inscription, Caledon churchyard.

1855-01-02: Twelve cess-payers in the Lower Barony of Dungannon were notified to attend court at Aughnacloy, for the purpose of electing six of their number previous to Lent Assizes, 1855. Mr. David Wilkin, of Glenarb, was on the list of cess-payers. Source: Tyrone Constitution, 15 December 1854. "County Tyrone Presentment Sessions." Digital copy online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaper-archive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-17, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick. Click on link to view transcription. 

1859-01-11: Twelve cess-payers in the Lower Barony of Dungannon were notified to attend court at Aughnacloy, for the purpose of electing six of their number previous to Lent Assizes, 1859. Mr. David Wilkin, of Glenarb, was on the list of cess-payers. Source: Tyrone Constitution, 19 November 1858. "County Tyrone Presentment Sessions." Digital copy online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaper-archive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-17, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick. Click on link to view transcription. 

1860: Under the direction of Richard Griffith, Ordnance Survey Office, the Primary Valuation was completed for the county of Tyrone. Land occupiers in Glenarb townland included Joseph M'Cleery, Arthur M'Gee, Michael O'Neill, and David Wilkin. The landlord was the Earl of Caledon. Map of holdingsSource: Primary Valuation of Ireland, 1848–1864. Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, Belfast; and, National Archives, Dublin. Click on 1st link to view transcription.

1860-02: A scoundrel, representing himself as the son of the late Rev. John Graham, insinuated himself into the confidence of Mr. Joseph M'Cleery, farmer, of Glenarb. At the end of a week's stay with Mr. M'Cleery, the schemer absconded, taking with him £20 of his host's money. Source: Northern Whig, 10 March 1860. "Breach of Trust and Robbery." Digital copy online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaper-archive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-17, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick. Click on link to view transcription.

1860-08-28: Death of James Huggins (1775–1860) in Derrycantone; he was the last of this line to reside in Glenarb townland. Source: The Belfast News-Letter, 1st September 1860.

1862-04-10: Inquest held at Lymnagre, near Tynan, on the body of Owen Hughes, who had gone on the previous day to Glenarb, to assist in setting potatoes, and afterwards, at home, died rather suddenly. Verdict, death caused by the bursting of a blood vessel in the lungs. Source: Armagh Guardian, 11 April 1862. "Sudden Death," of Owen Hughes. Digital copy online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaper-archive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-17, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick. Click on link to view transcription.

1866-05-15: Twelve cess-payers in the Lower Barony of Dungannon were notified to attend court at Caledon, for the purpose of electing six of their number previous to Summer Assizes, 1859. Mr. David Wilkin, of Glenarb, was on the list of cess-payers. Source: Tyrone Constitution, 27 April 1866. "County Tyrone Presentment Sessions." Digital copy online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaper-archive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-17, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick. Click on link to view transcription. 

1866-08-08: Mr. Armstrong, of Glenarb meadows, advertised a sale by auction. The item, or items, to be sold were not listed; however, it may have been hay. Source: Ulster Gazette, 4 August 1866. "M.R. Bell's Present Fixtures for Sales." Digital copy online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaper-archive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-17, by subscription). Extracted by Alison Kilpatrick. Click on link to view transcription. 

1867/8: Joseph M'Cleery ceased his rental in Glenarb townland, at which time David Wilkin became the tenant of the 25 acres, 1 rood, 35 perches holding. After this change, the tenants included David Wilkin (holding two plots), Michael O'Neill, and Arthur M'Gee. Source: Valuation Revision Book, 1864–1878. Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, ref. PRONI VAL/12/B/38/8B. Digital copy online at www.proni.gov.uk (accessed 2015-11-16).

1868-12-15: Twelve cess-payers in the Lower Barony of Dungannon were notified to attend court at Caledon, for the purpose of electing six of their number previous to Leny Assizes, 1869. Mr. Arthur Magee, of Glenarb, was on the list of cess-payers. Source: Tyrone Constitution, 27 November 1868. "County Tyrone Presentment Sessions." Digital copy online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaper-archive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-17, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick. Click on link to view transcription.

1870: Michael O'Neill ceased his rental in Glenarb, at which time Robert David Wilkin became the tenant. David Wilkin ceased rental of the plot which he had taken over from Joseph M'Cleery in 1867/8, and Robert David Wilkin assumed that holding. After these changes, the tenants included Robert David Wilkin (holding two plots), David Wilkin, and Arthur M'Gee. The area comprising Glenarb townland remained 191 acres 2 roods. Source: Valuation Revision Book, 1864–1878, op. cit.

1872-06-15: The Belfast Naturalists' Field Club conducted a tour of Tynan and Caledon, including a visit to Tynan Abbey on which were sited two ancient crosses recently removed from Glenarb townland. Report includes a brief outline of the history of Kinnard and the O'Neills. Source: Belfast News-Letter, 20 June 1872. "Belfast Naturalists' Field Club." Digital copy online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaper-archive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-17, by subscription). Extracted by Alison Kilpatrick. Click on link to view transcription.

c.1872: The third, and last surviving, high cross at Glenarb was removed to Caledon demesne, "justified by the injury it there received, the head or cross being used as a 'pushing stone.'" Source: Graves, "Clonarb and its Crosses," op. cit.

1873-10-23: Arthur M'Gee, of Glenarb, was selected to the Grand Jury for the Dungannon Quarter Sessions. Source: Belfast News-Letter, 23 October 1873. "Dungannon Quarter Sessions." Digital copy online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaper-archive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-17, by subscription). Extracted by Alison Kilpatrick. Click on link to view transcription.

1787-03-07: Sir James Stronge's harriers led the chase from Glenarb through Kedew and other neighbouring townlands. Source: Belfast News-Letter, 7 March 1878. "Sir James Stronge's Harriers." Digital copy online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaper-archive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-17, by subscription). Extracted by Alison Kilpatrick. Click on link to view transcription.

1880: David Wilkin ceased his rental in Glenarb townland, at which time Robert David Wilkin became the tenant of the holding. After this change, the tenants were Robert David Wilkin (three holdings) and Arthur M'Gee. The landlord was the Earl of Caledon. Source: Valuation Revision Book, 1879–1881. Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, ref. PRONI VAL/12/B/38/8C. Digital copy online at www.proni.gov.uk (accessed 2015-11-16). Note: There is an index entry for the civil registration of the death of David Wilkin, age 73 years, Armagh Registration District, 4th quarter ending 31 December 1879 (Vol. 1, pg. 35).

1881-02-16: Arthur M'Gee, of Glenarb, was selected to the Grand Jury for the Dungannon Quarter Sessions. Source: Belfast News-Letter, 5 April 1881. "Dungannon Quarter Sessions." Digital copy online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaper-archive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-17, by subscription). Extracted by Alison Kilpatrick. Click on link to view transcription.

1881-07-14: Robert D. Wilkin prosecuted Arthur Magee (both of Glenarb) for the alleged injury caused to Wilkin's farm in consequence of the removal of an embankment. The jury found for the plaintiff—£4 for the injury done to the grass, and £1 for the injury to potatoes. Sources: Belfast News-Letter, 14 July 1881, "Assize Intelligence. County of Armagh. Record Court;" and, Belfast News-Letter, 14 July 1881, "County of Armagh," re: Robert D. Wilkin v. Arthur Magee and others. Digital copies online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaper-archive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-18). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick. Click on link to view transcriptions.

1885: Robert David Wilkin sublet the house, in the northernmost holding of the townland, to John Daly, while retaining tenancy of the land. Source: Valuation Revision Book, 1882–1894. Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, ref. PRONI VAL/12/B/38/8D. Digital copy online at www.proni.gov.uk (accessed 2015-11-16).

1890: Counterpart Lease by the Rt Hon. the Earl of Caledon, to William Teasey Caledon, merchant, Robert D. Wilkin, Glenarb, Co. Tyrone, farmer, and Thomas A. McClure, Rose Lodge, Polnagh, Co. Armagh, farmer, trustees on behalf of the congregation of Caledon in Co. Tyrone in connection with the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland, of a plot of ground at Caledon for a burial ground. Source: PRONI D847/5/60.

1891-10-01: Robert D. Wilkin advertised his tillage and grazing farm, at Glenarb, for sale by private treaty. Source: Belfast News-Letter, 1 October 1891. "Glenarb, Caledon, County Tyrone," re: sale of farm, by private treaty. Online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaper-archive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-17). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick. Click on link to view transcription.

1892: Robert David Wilkin ceased rental of his three holdings in Glenarb townland. John Daly ceased the sublet of the house that he had been occupying since 1885. Arthur Magee became the sole tenant of the townland. Source: Valuation Revision Book, 1882–1894, op. cit.

1893: Edward Magee became the tenant of the three northernmost land holdings in Glenarb townland. Arthur Magee retained tenancy of the fourth. Source: Valuation Revision Book, 1882–1894, op. cit.

1899: Death of Mr. Arthur Magee. Source: Index entry for the civil registration of the death of Arthur M'Gee, age 72 years, Dungannon Registration District, 1st quarter ending 31 March 1899 (Vol. 1, pg. 595). Original record: General Register Office, Dublin. Digital index online at Ancestry (accessed 2015-11-17, by subscription).

1899-09-13: The Misses Magee, of Glenarb House, assisted at the Bazaar in aid of a new convent for the Presentation Nuns, and school, in Portadown. Source: Dublin Daily Nation, 13 September 1899. "Presentation Nuns, Portadown. Bazaar in Aid of New Convent and Schools." Online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaper-archive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-17). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick. Click on link to view transcription.

1900: The representatives of Arthur McGee became the tenants of the southernmost holding in Glenarb townland. Source: Valuation Revision Book, 1895–1911. Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, ref. PRONI VAL/12/B/38/8E. Digital copy online at www.proni.gov.uk (accessed 2015-11-16).

1901-04-02: Census enumeration forms were collected. Ten residents, occupying four dwelling-houses, were enumerated in the townland. The heads of household were: John Jordan, agricultural labourer; Joseph McGee, farmer; William Millar, agricultural labourer; and, Patrick Murphy, general labourer. The dwelling-house of Edward McGee was unhabited, as he was in Glasgow. Source: Census of Ireland, 1901. National Archives of Ireland, Dublin. Digitised, &c., in partnership with Library and Archives Canada. Online at www.census.nationalarchives.ie (accessed 2015-11-17).

1901: The 1901 Belfast Street Directory listed Arthur McGee and Edward McGee as farmers at Caledon. Source, as cited. Online at Lennon Wylie, www.lennonwylie.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-17).

1902: Joseph McGee became the tenant of the plot formerly held by the representatives of Arthur McGee. Source: Valuation Revision Book, 1895-1911, op. cit.

1904: Joseph McGee sublet two small houses, each with a small garden, one to Patrick Murphy, and the other to John Jordan. Source: Valuation Revision Book, 1895-1911, op. cit.

1906: The northernmost plots, held by Edward Magee, were merged into one holding. Source: Valuation Revision Book, 1895-1911, op. cit.

1908: John Jordan ceased his sublet with Joseph McGee, and William Bloomer became the new tenant. Source: Valuation Revision Book, 1895-1911, op. cit.

1909: William Bloomer ceased his sublet with Joseph McGee, and Samuel Mills became the new tenant. Source: Valuation Revision Book, 1895-1911, op. cit.

1910: The Belfast and Ulster Towns Directory listed the following residents of Glenarb townland: Edward Magee, J.P., farmer,  Joseph Magee, farmer. Source, as cited. Online at www.libraryireland.com (accessed 2015-11-17).

1911-04-04: Census enumeration forms were collected. Thirteen residents, occupying five dwelling-houses, were enumerated in the townland. The heads of household were: James Muldoon, farm labourer; Patrick Murphy, farm labourer, Joseph McGee, farmer; and, William Millar, agricultural labourer. Lizzie McCann and Patrick Hughes occupied a house, with no head of family stipulated: both were employed as servants. The 1911 census included an enumeration of the numbers and types of out-offices and farm-steadings. Thus, in Glenarb townland, in addition to the five dwelling-houses, there were also 3 stables, 2 coach houses, 4 cow houses, 1 calf house, 1 piggery, 5 fowl houses, 1 boiling house, 2 barns, 1 turf house, 2 potato houses, 1 workshop, 3 sheds, and 1 laundry—totalling 27 out-houses and farm-steadings. Source: Census of Ireland, 1911. National Archives of Ireland, Dublin. Digitised, &c., in partnership with Library and Archives Canada. Online at www.census.nationalarchives.ie (accessed 2015-11-17).

1913: Samuel Mills ceased his sublet with Joseph McGee, and Jas Muldoon became the new tenant. Source: Valuation Revision Book, 1912–1929. Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, ref. PRONI VAL/12/B/38/8F. Digital copy online at www.proni.gov.uk (accessed 2015-11-16).

1913-10-14: Under the heading, Names of Magistrates, with Date of Appointment and Particulars (so far as can be ascertained) of the Designation, Profession, or Occupation of each such person at the time of his appointment to the Commission of the Peace: "Joseph M'Gee, Glenarb House, Caledon, appointed 14th October, 1913, Farmer." Source: House of Commons, United Kingdom. Papers by Command. Vol. LXVIII. HMSO (1914), pg. 16.

1915: Edward Magee purchased all of his holdings in Glenarb —amounting to the entire land area of the townland—under the Land Act (1881). As a result, Mr. Magee owned these plots "in fee." Source: Valuation Revision Book, 1912-1929, op. cit.

1918: Under the heading of "Caledon," the 1918 Belfast Street Directory listed Edward McGee, J.P., and Joseph McGee, J.P., as farmers at Glenarb. Source, as cited. Online at Lennon Wylie, www.lennonwylie.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-17).

1929-05-23: Death of Edward Magee, at Glasgow. Source: Will Calendars, Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (Belfast), online at proni.gov.uk, accessed 2015-11-17.

1929: Mrs. Margaret Magee became the owner of all plots in Glenarb townland. Source: Valuation Revision Book, 1912-1929, op. cit.

1949-11-19: Death of Mrs. Margaret Magee. Source: Will Calendars, PRONI, online at www.proni.gov.uk, accessed 2015-11-17).

Please cite your sources.

See also:

This page was first published on the 30th November 2014, and edited subsequently on the 3rd December 2015.

Return to Local history timelines index page.

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© Alison Kilpatrick, 2015. All rights reserved.
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"The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there."—Lesley Poles Hartley (1895–1972), The Go-Between (1953).

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