St. Helena timeline: 1847

Sources are provided [within square brackets] at the end of each timeline entry, except for those sources which repeat. Recurring sources are (indicated by round parentheses), with the source citation abbreviated as shown in the following key:

  • BNA: The British Newspaper Archive, britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-05-16, 2015-06-27ff, by subscription); transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.
  • Commissioners 1849: Great Britain. Reports from Commissioners: Nine Volumes. (2.) Colonial Land and Emigration, &c. Session 1 February – 1 August 1849. Vol. XXII (1849).
  • Jackson: St. Helena: The Historic Island, by E.L. Jackson (New York: Thomas Whittaker, 1905).
  • Lords 1849: Great Britain. House of Lords. Report of the Select Committee of the House of Lords, appointed to consider the best Means which Great Britain can adopt for the Final Extinction of the African Slave Trade, Session 1849, ordered by the House of Commons to be Printed, 15 February 1850.
  • Mellis: St. Helena: A Physical, Historical, and Topographical Description of the Island, by John Charles Mellis (London: L. Reeve & Co., 1875).
  • Merchants 1848: The Merchants' Magazine and Commercial Review, Vol. XIX (July–Dec. 1848), conducted by Freeman Hunt (New York: 142 Fulton Street, 1848).
  • Old Saints: The St. Helena Regiment, ‘The Old Saints, on the Saint Helena Island Info web site, http://sainthelenaisland.info/regiment.htm (accessed 2015-05-16).
  • SHII: Saint Helena Island Info (accessed 2015-06-28ff).

Please note: Some articles contain language and characterizations which may have been in common use at the time the articles or stories were written, but which are no longer acceptable. Such language and chartacterizations do not reflect the opinions of the compiler or web site owner.

1847: List of the Officers of the St. Helena Regiment:

  • Format: Rank Name; Rank in the Regiment; Rank in the Army.
  • Lieut. Col. John Ross; 6 Feb. 1846; Col. 9 Nov. 1846.
  • Major Henry Edward O'Dell; 30 Aug. 1843; 10 Jan. 1837.
  • Captain Gilbert Woollard; 7 Jan. 1842; 27 Mar. 1840.
  • Captain George Adams Barnes; 7 Jan. 1842; 30 Oct. 1840.
  • Captain James Keating; 30 Aug. 1843; —.
  • Captain James Piggott; 15 Mar. 1844; Major 9 Nov. 1844.
  • Captain C.H. Marechaux; 14 June 1844; 5 Aug. 1842.
  • Lieutenant Alexander Imlach; 7 Jan. 1842; —.
  • Lieutenant William Forbes Macbean; 7 Jan. 1842; —.
  • Lieutenant Thomas Jones; 7 Jan. 1842; —.
  • Lieutenant Frederick Rice Stack; 7 Jan. 1842; —.
  • Lieutenant Henry Robert Cowell; 6 June 1845; 1 Mar. 1844.
  • Lieutenant John Smith Cannon; 14 April 1846; —.
  • Ensign Joseph Hayes; 10 Feb. 1843; Adjutant.
  • Ensign John Henry Prenderville; 10 Nov. 1843; —.
  • Ensign John Gandy; 21 Mar. 1845; —.
  • Ensign Robert Alex. Loudon; 16 Sept. 1845; —.
  • Ensign John Denham Saunder; 14 Apr. 1846; —.
  • Adjutant Joseph Hayes; 30 Dec. 1845; Ensign 10 Feb. 1843.
  • Quartermaster William Miller; 7 Jan. 1842; —.
  • Surgeon John Wardrop Moore; 7 Apr. 1843; 10 Feb. 1843.
  • Assistant-Surgeon John Mullins; 13 Oct. 1843; —.
  • Facings buff.
  • Agent, Sir John Kirkland.

Source: A List of the Officers of the Army and of the Corps of Royal Marines, on Full, Retired, and Half-Pay; with an Index, 1847 (London: W. Clowes & Sons, 1847), pg. 319.

1847: "The erection of a fine Hospital, with every requisite for medical and surgical treatment, took place in the year 1847. It being intended, by the imposition of a small fee upon all ships anchoring in the roadstead, that their masters and crews should receive the benefits of the institution free of any further charge. Many a seafaring man, and many ships' crews, stricken down by scurvy or other diseases, have reason to be grateful to this valuable institution which, open to all nations, lay directly on the high road of their voyage home." (Melliss, pg. 32) Jackson stated that the hospital was chiefly for the use of the merchant service (pg. 79).

1847: “Distressing accounts of the destitution in Ireland and in the Highlands of Scotland came to the island, and we find that the non-commissioned officers and men of the St. Helena regiment nobly came forward with a day’s pay each (which a soldier can ill afford in this colony) for the relief of their destitute countrymen. This offering, with the contributions of the officers, made the sum of £40, which was forwarded to London for the sufferers, and the receipt of it was acknowledged with warm and sincere thanks.” (Jackson, pg. 81)

1847: "The Chinese barracks in Plantation grounds were pulled down, but the cut blue stone and other valuable relics were preserved. These are now in the museum."  (Jackson, pg. 81)

1847-01-10: Capture of Brazilian brigantine, Telina or Felina, 119-1/2 tons, Jose Antonio Cordeiro, master; seized by F.F. [sic] Birch, Esq., commander, H.M.S. Waterwitch; arrived at St. Helena, under charge of Mr. M'Clune, master's assistant, Waterwitch; adjudicated by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena, 18 Feb. 1847: prosecution by Mr. Gideon, Proctor for the captors, and "being undefended, the vessel was condemned upon the usual affidavits, under the 8th and 9th Victoria, cap. 122, and ordered to be broken up and sold;" — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 365; Jackson, pg. 284)

1847-01-14: Capture of Constante Amizade, 65 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 365)

1847-02: New Colours were presented to the St Helena Militia.
   "The ground selected for the occasion was Francis Plain, the headquarters of the corps. On the arrival of the new colours in front of the regiment, the two field pieces were placed muzzle to muzzle and the colours laid on them, a temporary altar of drums being placed near. Immediately after the consecration by R.M. Kempthorne, M.A., Colonial chaplain, they were handed by Captains H. Doveton and Kennedy to Miss Ross, who handed them to the ensigns elected to receive them. She made a short speech on delivering them, and they were then trooped down the front of the line attended by the old guard, who took their appointed stations, when the old colours were conducted to the mess-house. The governor commented upon the absence of Lieut.-Col. Lambe, who was suffering from servere indisposition, and stated that, as the memory of the late Sir William Doveton, under whose command the St. Helena militia served for many years, was held dear, not only by the regiment but by all classes of island people, he had directed that the old colours, under which the corps had so often meritoriously and so gallantly conducted themselves, at the time when the security of the island was seriously threatened, should be placed over the monument of that patriotic individual, as a memorial of the esteem of his countrymen." (Jackson, pp. 80-1)

1847-02-26: Capture of Nictheroy, 153 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 365)

1847-03-18: Capture of Brazilian felucca, Saron, 123 tons; siezed by H.M.'s steam frigate Penelope, H.W. Giffard, Esq., captain; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 365; Jackson, pg. 286)

1847-03-18: Capture of schooner, Jupiter, 63* tons, with 317 slaves on board; siezed by H.M.'s steam frigate Penelope, H.W. Giffard, Esq., captain; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena. (Lords 1849, pg. 365; Jackson, pg. 286) * Jackson cited 52 tons.

1847-03-30: Capture of brigantine, supposed Felicidade,* 67-76/100 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 365) * Jackson cited Jupiter as having been seized on the 30th March, 1846 (pg. 286).

1847-04-04: Capture of Brazilian schooner, Joanito, 52 tons; siezed by H.M.'s steam frigate Penelope, H.W. Giffard, Esq., captain; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 365; Jackson, pg. 286)

chinese junk keying 2a

The Illustrated London News, 1 April 1848, pg. 222;
posted to “Keying (ship)," online at Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, en.wikipedia.org (accessed 2015-07-07), from John Weedy’s collection of images from The Illustrated London News, http://www.iln.org.uk.

1847-04-17: Description by Captain A.D. Kellett of a beautiful Chinese junk, the Keying, which put into St. Helena:

  The junk Keying left China December 6th, 1846; arrived at St. Helena 17th April, 1847; having had very light winds nearly the whole voyage, having been at anchor six weeks in the Java Sea, and Sunda Straits, with light southerly and south-west winds. Off the Mauritius experienced some very heavy weather on the 22nd and 23rd March, but found her to be a most beautiful sea boat, and easy, never having shipped a drop of water since leaving China, or leaking. Her masts and rudder are of immense size and weight, being made of iron-wood, her rudder is hung to three large ropes, and drawn into her stern by two others, going underneath her bottom and coming over the bows, and when the rudder is down draws 23 feet, but when hoisted only 13 feet. It sometimes takes twenty men to steer her; but in fine weather, running before the wind, she goes so steady that the tiller rarely requires to be touched, and then two men can steer her. She is built in compartments, having fifteen, several of which are watertight; she has a main deck, raised quarter-deck, two poops and a raised forecastle, with a high verandah above that again; her main deck is arched. Her anchors are made of wood, and the shanks made 30 feet long. The cables are made of bamboo, the ropes made of bamboo, rattan and grass; she has three water tanks built on her decks; her sails reef themselves by lowering the halyards, so that one man to each mast, at the halyards, can either reef the sail or take it in in a minute; her stern and bows are open, but she is so very buoyant that she never takes in any water at either end. Her main cabin or saloon is 30 feet long, 25 feet wide, and 12 feet high, painted with various birds, beasts, etc. She has also six cabins on the first poop, with the joss house in the centre, in which a light is constantly kept burning. Her stern is 32 feet high of the water.——St. Helena Gazette. (Jackson, pp. 285-6)

1847-05-24: Capture of Duas Irmaas, 56 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 365)

1847-05-27:
Portsmouth.
(From our own Correspondent.)
  The Atholl troop-ship, Mr Pearn, master, commanding, re-fitting at Sheerness, is to proceed to the Cape of Good Hope with a detachment of Royal Artillery. She will embark from this port a detachment of the 45th and St. Helena Regiments, for conveyance thither. (BNA: Brighton Gazette, 27 May 1847)

1847-06-06: Capture of Braziliense, 211-1/2 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 365)

1847-06-19: Capture of Felucca, unknown; 80 ft long, 24 ft broad, 11-1/2 ft deep; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 365)

1847-06-28:
Worship-street.——The Adventures of a Slave.
  A woman of colour, named Margaret Clayton, applied to Mr. Broughton, the magistrate, on Saturday, to know if she could not be divorced from her husband, to whom she had been married at St. Helena, while he was stationed there as a private soldier, in proof of which she produced her certificate. The magistrate questioned the poor woman as to the various circumstances of her history, of which she gave the following account:——
  Her father, she said, was a negro slave, and her mother a woman of colour like herself, and when born she herself was, as a matter of course, a slave, the property of her father's owner, who, afterwards sold her. She was bought and sold many times, but the first that she remembered was being sold at fifteen years of age to a Captain's lady at St. Helena. The price paid for her was 50l., and she was employed to nurse the children, and was very kindly treated, but she was thoughtless and giddy, she said, as girls would be, and she ran away. They found her again, however, and she was taken back, but some time afterwards they sold her, and the next mistress she had treated her brutally. She was afterwards sold to a soldier, who paid 83l. for her and married her, and she became a free woman. That husband, however, died, and she afterwards married her present husband, a private in the St. Helena Regiment, who brought her to England, and had since his discharge been employed at the London Docks.
  Mr. Broughton asked her if she remembered Napoleon Buonaparte, and had ever seen him at St. Helena?
  She said yes. After some further questions she stated that she was fifty-one years old, and had five children, one a son twenty years of age and the youngest only eighteen months.
  The Magistrate made her understand that he had no power to divorce the applicant from her husband, but he directed one of the warrant officers of the Court to note the particulars and see the husband, and try to arrange matters between them; and as the applicant appeared to be in a poor condition he gave her a small sum of money for present assistance.
(BNA: Morning Post, 28 June 1847)

1847-07-09: Capture of Esperto, 145-1/2 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-07-09: Capture of brig, unknown, supposed Voador, 207 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-07-10: Death: July 10, at St. Helena, aged 47, Lieutenant Matthew O'Connor, of the St. Helena Regiment.
(BNA: Cork Examiner, 27 Sept. 1847)

1847-07-12: Capture of Sāo Sebastāo, 60 foreign tons; vessel was condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 365)

1847-07-19: Capture of Faisea, 191 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-08: "In August a fire broke out on the premises of Mr. Gigney, but, under the defatigable labours of Mr. Gigney himself, together with Town-Major Barnes and troops, it was extinguished." (Jackson, pg. 81)

1847-08-06: Capture of brigantine, unknown, 100 foreign tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-08-12: Capture of Adelaide, 147 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-08-18: Capture of Nero, 119-1/2 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-08-19: Establishment of the Poor Society, which provided relief and burial allowances. (Jackson, pg. 302)

1847-08-29: Capture of Phœnix, 145 foreign tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-09-07: Married: On Tuesday last, at Shirley Street, in this county [Warwickshire], by the Rev. Nash Stephenson, Joseph Hayes, Esq., of her Majesty's St. Helena Regiment, to Harriet, youngest daughter of the late John Martin, Esq., of the Third Dragoon Guards. (BNA: Birmingham Gazette, 13 Sept. 1847)

1847-09-08:
Friday's London Gazette.
War Office, Sept. 10.
  Unattached——Lieut. A. Imlach, from the St. Helena Regiment. (BNA: Hampshire Telegraph, 11 Sept. 1847)

1847-09-09: Capture of Maria Thereza, 71-1/2 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured.
(Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-09-09: Capture of Astrura, 159 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-09-10:
Military Promotions.
War Office, September 10.
  Unattached——To be Captains, without purchase ... Lieutenant A. Imlach, from the St. Helena Regiment.
(BNA: Dublin Evening Post, 16 Sept. 1847)

1847-09-14: Capture of Attrevida, 248 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-09-30: "The following extract shows the number of Africans captured by H.M. Cruisers and brought to St. Helena between June 9, 1840, and September 30, 1847, and the manner of their disposal:—
    Received, 9,133 slaves. Born, 22. Total, 9,155.
    These 9,155 souls were accounted for, as follows:
    Emigrated to the West Indian Colonies: to Jamaica, 1,093; to British Guiana, 2,115; to Trinidad, 1,136.
    Emigrated to Cape of Good Hope, 1,410.
    Deceased, 2,926.
    Removed from the depôt as servants, 445.
    Missing, supposed to be drowned, 1.
    Remaining in charge on 30th Sept., 1847, 29. (Jackson, pg. 261)

1847-10-02: Capture of Aventureiro, 113 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-10-07: Capture of Venus, 180-1/2 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-10-08: Capture of Sappho, 173 tons; sailed under no Colours; fully equipped for slave trade; captured by the Contest; sent to St. Helena; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pp. 366, 390)

1847-10-08: Capture of barque, unknown, 300 foreign tons; vessel was condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-10-09: Capture of brig, unknown, 240 foreign tons; vessel was condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-10-17: Capture of Sylphide, 312 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-10-19: Capture of Quatorze de Novembro; 65 ft long, 19 ft 4 in broad, 9 ft 7 in deep; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-10-24: Capture of Heroina, 62 foreign tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-10-27: Capture of Rey Bango, 10 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; 60 slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-11-03: Capture of Santo Antonio Ditozo, 61 foreign tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-11-06: Capture of Eolo, 77 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-11-07: Capture of Izabel, 170-1/2 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-11-15: Capture of brig, unknown, supposed Flamingo, 152-12/65 foreign tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-11-15: Capture of Boa Fé, 53 foreign tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-11-20: Capture of Luiza, 162-1/2 tons, with 650 slaves on board; sailed under no Colours; captured by the Heroine; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena. (Lords 1849, pp. 366, 390)

1847-11-23: Capture of Conceiçāo; 81 ft long, 21 ft 4 in broad, 9-1/4 ft deep; sailed under no Colours; fully equipped for slave trade; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; destroyed, being unseaworthy; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-11-29: Capture of schooner, unknown; 70 ft long, 16 ft broad, 6 ft deep; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-11-30:
Irish Intelligence.
  The Catholic soldiers of the St. Helena Regiment, in the island of that name, are unprovided with a Catholic Chaplain. No Catholic priest is on the island. There are two Protestant clergymen paid by the English government for their attendance; there is no fund to support, and no regulation to secure, a Catholic priest. The religious duties are discharged, as far as they can be, by a layman, Lieutenant Prenderville, a Catholic officer. Some time back when about to read prayers for the dead over a Catholic soldier, the Protestant clergyman attempted to prevent him, and when he persevered, wrote home to the Government, lodging a complaint. His bigotry was not, however, gratified; for the government respected the Catholic's [sic] religious feelings; but, shameful to say, they leave the Catholic soldiery without the religious attendance to which they are as well entitled as their Protestant comrades.
(BNA: Limerick and Clare Examiner, 30 Nov. 1847)

1847-12: By letters patent, St. Helena was included in the See of Cape Town (Anglican). "As the Bishop did not reside on the island, an ordinance was passed to determine the authority of the Governor of St. Helena to grant marriage licences." (Jackson, pg. 82)

1847-12-01: Capture of brig, unknown; 125 ft long, 28 ft broad, 14 ft deep; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-12-01: Capture of schooner, unknown, 49-1/2 tons; vessel was condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-12-07: Married: On the 7th of December, at Plantation Church, St. Helena, by the Rev. R. Kempthorpe, W. Forbes Macbean, Esq., St. Helena Regiment, son of Colonel Macbean, late of the Royal Artillery, to Mary Amelia, eldest daughter of the late Colonel Archibald Ross, and niece of his Excellency Major-General Sir Patrick Ross. (BNA: Morning Post, 9 Feb. 1848)

1847-12-11: Capture of Santa Anna; 56 ft long, 14 ft broad, 9-1/4 ft deep; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-12-16: Capture of Gaio, 106 4-1/2 ft long, 12-1/2 ft broad, 12 ft deep; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847-12-27: Capture of Cidade d'Angra, 276 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 366)

1847: During the last half year of 1847, the number of liberated Africans was small, and no emigration took place from the island.
(Commissioners 1849, pg. 21)

1847: The number of British merchant vessels touching at St. Helena was 652; vessels of war, 25; whalers, 3; French vessels, 92; American, 73; Dutch, 110; Swedish, 9; other foreign flags, 35; captured slave vessels, 24; for a total of 1,023 vessels during the year. The average time of passage from Calcutta to St. Helena was 79 days. (Merchants 1848, pp. 645-6)

1847: Governor Sir Patrick Ross, G.C.M.G., submitted the annual Blue Book for the colony of St. Helena to the Right Hon. Earl Grey, dated 1st May 1848, the highlights of which follow:

  • Population, 5,500.
  • Vital statistics: 99 deaths, 66 of whom were inhabitants.
  • Number of cases treated in hospital, 235, 25 of whom died.
  • Expenses in connection with the poor, £600 a-year on average.
  • Four private societies operated for the benefit of the lower classes, as did the Benevolent Society, founded in 1814 and patronized by Government. Two schools in town and three in the country were maintained by the Benevolent Society.
  • Government schools were allotted £500 annually, and were open to all classes. 290 children were instructed in these schools during the year.
  • One-half of the children in the colony had not attended school.
  • 1,203 vessels touched at St. Helena, 653 of which were English merchant vessels.
  • 932 liberated Africans arrived in the colony.
  • Total number of prisoners committed during the year, 288. A large number of the prisoners in the colony were soldiers. "A prison for this class, to contain eight, [was] in progress of construction on Ladder-hill, by order of the Secretary-at-War."
  • Changes to the civil establishment included the appointment of Mr. Mapleton, Summary Judge, vice Hodson resigned; and, Mr. Melliss, provisionally appointed country magistrate.
  • Pensions were granted to: Henry Cearly, late master plumber, £32 a-year; Henry Doveton, £90; and, to the orphans of Captain Pritchard, late of the East India Company's service, £40.

Source: The Sessional Papers, printed by order of The House of Lords, in the Session 1847-8, Vol. XL, Reports from Commissioners, &c., subject of this volume: Colonial Possessions, pp. 259-61.

Previous: Link to timeline for the year 1846.
Next: Link to the timeline for the year 1848.

This page was first published on the 7th July 2015; subsequently edited, 14th July 2015.

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"The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there."—Lesley Poles Hartley (1895–1972), The Go-Between (1953).

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