St. Helena timeline: 1842

Sources are provided [within square brackets] at the end of each timeline entry, except for those sources which repeat. Recurring sources are (indicated by round parentheses), with the source citation abbreviated as shown in the following key:

  • BNA: The British Newspaper Archive, britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-05-16, 2015-06-27ff, by subscription); transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.
  • Emigration: Great Britain. House of Commons. Accounts and Papers: Twenty Volumes. (6.) Emigration. Session 3 February – 12 August 1842. Vol. XXXI (1842).
  • Immigration: Great Britain. House of Commons. Reports from Commissioners: Eighteen Volumes. (18.) Colonial Land and Emigration, &c. Session 2 February – 24 August 1843. Vol. XXIX. 
  • Jackson: St. Helena: The Historic Island, by E.L. Jackson (New York: Thomas Whittaker, 1905).
  • Lords 1849: Great Britain. House of Lords. Report of the Select Committee of the House of Lords, appointed to consider the best Means which Great Britain can adopt for the Final Extinction of the African Slave Trade, Session 1849, ordered by the House of Commons to be Printed, 15 February 1850.
  • Mellis: St. Helena: A Physical, Historical, and Topographical Description of the Island, by John Charles Mellis (London: L. Reeve & Co., 1875).
  • Old Saints: The St. Helena Regiment, "The Old Saints," on the Saint Helena Island Info web site, www.sainthelenaisland.info/regiment.htm (accessed 2015-05-16).
  • SHII: Saint Helena Island Info, (accessed 2015-06-28ff).
  • Slave 1847: Great Britain. House of Commons. Accounts and Papers: Thirty-Seven Volumes. (34.) Slave Trade. Session 19 January – 23 July 1847. Vol. LXVII.

Please cite your sources.

Note: Some articles contain language and characterizations which may have been in common use at the time the articles or stories were written, but which are no longer acceptable. Such language and chartacterizations do not reflect the opinions of the compiler or web site owner.

1842: Population of the island of St. Helena, about 5,000.
Source: System of Universal Geography, James Laurie and Adriano Balbi (Edinburgh: Adam and Charles Black; London: Longman, Brown, Green, & Longmans 1842), pg. 871.

1842-01-04: Capture of brigantine, unknown, 105 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured.
(Lords 1849, pg. 362)

1842-01-06: Colonel Hamelin Trelawney was appointed Governor of the Island of Saint Helena. (Jackson, pg. 295; Mellis, pg. 32)

1842-01-10:
Military Promotions——War-office, Jan. 7.
  St. Helena Regiment——Major Henry Simmonds, from the 61st Foot, to be Lieutenant-Colonel, without purchase; Brevet-Major John Thoreau, from the 37th Foot, to be Major, without purchase. To be Captains, without purchase——Captain Henry Edward O'Dell, from half-pay 67th Foot; Captain Gilbert Woollard, from half-pay Unattached; Captain George Adams Barnes, from the 91st Foot; Lieutenant William Caruthers, from 75th Foot; Lieutenant Frederick Nepean Skinner, from the Royal Newfoundland Veteran Companies. To be Lieutenants, without purchase——Lieutenant James Keating, from the 4th Foot; Ensign and Quartermaster Alexander Imlach, from the 1st Foot; Ensign William Forbes Macbean, from the 86th Foot; Ensign Thomas Jones, from 61st Foot; Ensign Frederick Rice Stack, from the 45th Foot. To be Ensigns, without purchase——Robert John Hughes, Gent; Andrew Clarke, Gent; Thomas Picton Stephens, Gent; Charles Richard Butler, Gent; George Thompson, Gent. To be Quartermaster——Acting Sergeant-Major William Miller, from the 91st Foot.
 (BNA: Freeman's Journal, 10 January 1842)

1842-01-14:
The Army.
  The newly ordered Regiment for St. Helena will be formed at Winchester, its head-quarters. The Lieutenant-Colonelcy of the new Regiment is conferred upon Major Simmonds, of the 61st.
  The St. Helena Regiment is to consist of five companies of 75 men each. Two hundred and fifty will be composed of volunteers from the 25th, 27th, and 75th, at the Cape of Good Hope, and 125 are to be recruited for in the London district.
  William Forbes Macbean, senior ensign of the 86th, and aides-de-camp [sic] to Lieutenant-General Sir W. Macbean, commanding in the Limerick district, is promoted to a lieutenancy in the St. Helena Regiment, now being officered for service in that island.
(BNA: Dublin Morning Register, 14 Jan. 1842)

1842-01-18:
The Army.
(Specially reported for the Evening Packet.)
  45th——This corps has furnished twenty volunteers to the Royal St. Helena regiment. 
(BNA: Dublin Evening Packet, 18 Jan. 1842)

1842-01-21:
The Army.——The 29th and 45th, at Belfast and Dublin, have given 20 volunteers each to the St. Helena Regiment.
(BNA: Dublin Morning Register, 21 Jan. 1842)

1842-01-21: Capture of boat, unknown, — tons; vessel restored by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 362)

1842-01-22:
A new regiment, called the St. Helena Regiment, is to be raised here [Winchester]. Colonel Simmond, late Major in the 61st, is to have the command. (BNA: Hampshire Advertiser, 22 Jan. 1842)

1842-01-22:
The Army.
(Specially reported for the 
Evening Packet.)
  84th——A detachment, consisting of twenty men, volunteers for the Royal St. Helena regiment, has received orders to march from Limerick to Dublin, and on arrival will be quartered in the Royal Barracks until embarkation for Chatham.
(BNA: Dublin Evening Packet, 1842-01-22)

1842-01-28:
War-Office, Jan. 28.
  St. Helena Regiment——John Smith Cannon, Gent., to be Ensign, without purchase, vice Clarke, whose appointment has been cancelled; Second Class Staff-Surgeon William Smith to be Surgeon; Henry Julian, Gent., to be Assistant Surgeon.

(BNA: Morning Chronicle, 29 Jan. 1842)

1842-01-28:
Woolwich.——January 28. (From a Correspondent.)
  St. Helena Regiment.——A  corps for permanent service in St. Helena is in progress of formation, and will be organised at Winchester. The majority of the officers have already been appointed, and the men are to be raised by volunteers from other regiments of the line. When the announcement was made to the 15th Regiment at Woolwich, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Lord Charles Wellesley, that men were wanted for this service, nearly two hundred expressed a desire to join the new regiment, but twenty only were permitted to enrol their names for that service. Such alacrity on the part of the men shows they are ready to engage in the service of their country in any part of the world.

(BNA: Morning Post, 29 Jan. 1842)

1842-02-02:
The Army. 45th.
  The detachment of volunteers for the Royal St. Helena Regiment will embark early next week at the North wall, per steamer, for Liverpool, on route to Winchester, there to join headquarters.(BNA: Waterford Mail, 2 Feb. 1842)

1842-02-02: Dublin Garrison.——Twenty volunteers, each from the 29th, 45th, and 84th for the St. Helena Regiment, were inspected at the Royal Hospital on yesterday, at 12 o'clock, and will embark this day for Liverpool, en route to Winchester, under the command of Lieutenant Stack, late of the 45th Regiment.
(BNA: Freeman's Journal, 2 Feb. 1842)

1842-02-03:
The Army.
(Specially reported for the Evening Packet.)
  Twenty privates from the 15th foot have volunteered to the St. Helena regiment, and proceeded to Winchester.
(BNA: Dublin Evening Packet, 3 Feb. 1842)

1842-02-05:
Winchester. Saturday, February, 5.——A new regiment is about to be raised at our barracks, to be called the St. Helena Regiment, to consist of five companies of eighty men each, besides commissioned and non-commissioned officers. Several detachments have already arrived, consisting of men who have volunteered from other regiments of the line, to the number of twenty from each regiment.
(BNA: Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 7 Feb. 1842)

1842-02-08:
The Army.
(Specially reported for the Evening Packet.)
  Royal St. Helena Regiment——Officers present at Winchester, headquarters:——Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Simonds [sic] commanding, Major J. Thoreau, Brevet Major Henry E. O'Dell, Captains Gilbert, Woollard [sic], W. Carruthers, and F.N. Skinner; Lieutenants J. Keating, A. Imlach, T. Jones, and F.R. Stack; Ensigns R. Jones Hughes, Thomas Picton Stephens, Charles Reid Butler, George Thompson, and John Smith Cannon; Quartermaster W. Miller, Surgeon Wm. Smith, and Assistant-Surgeon Henry Julian. Captain Barnes and Lieutenant W.H. Macbean are on leave.
(BNA: Dublin Evening Packet, 8 Feb. 1842)

1842-02-08: Capture of boat, unknown, 8 tons, with nine slaves on board; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena.
(Lords 1849, pg. 362)

1842-02-08: Capture of boat, unknown, 4 tons, with 50 slaves on board; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena. (Lords 1849, pg. 362)

1842-02-09: Capture of boat, unknown, 363 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 362)

1842-02-10: Capture of brig, unknown, 4 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 362)

1842-02-10: T.F. Elliot, Esq., and the Hon. E.E. Villiers, of the Colonial Land and Emigration Office, wrote a despatch to J. Stephen, Esq. [Sir James Stephen, K.C.B], Under-Secretary of State for the Colonies, begging "leave to suggest for Lord Stanley's consideration the expediency of instructing the Governor of St. Helena for causing them [the liberated Africans] to be provided, before they embark, with a proper supply of clothing, including at least two blankets, or one blanket and a rug for each passenger, together with two Guernsey frocks for each male, and two woollen gowns for each female, and such quantity of other articles as may be suited to the habits which have been formed on the spot." (Emigration, pg. 486)

1842-02-12: Lord Stanley wrote a despatch to the Governor of St. Helena, advising "that Her Majesty's Government are now sending out the following quantities of warm clothing for the use of the liberated Africans who are to be removed from St. Helena to the West Indies, viz. 1,000 blankets, or rugs; 1,000 Guernsey frocks, (600 of the full men's size, and 400 of a smaller size,) and 250 woollen gowns. (Emigration, pg. 486)

1842-02-11: The volunteer corporals from the line are to have the rank of sergeant in the St. Helena Regiment.
(BNA: Dublin Morning Register, 11 Feb. 1842)

1842-02-13: Capture of Diligencia, 97 tons, with 413 slaves on board; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena. (Lords 1849, pg. 362)

1842-02-14:
Winchester.
Saturday, February 12.
The volunteers from the different regiments are daily arriving in this city, to form the new St. Helena Regiment, now being raised.
(BNA: Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 14 Feb. 1842)

1842-02-15:
The Army.
(Specially reported for the Evening Packet.)
  37th——Color Sergeant Joseph Brownell is ordered to march from head-quarters, Templemore, on route to Winchester, there to join the Royal St. Helena regiment, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Symonds [sic].
(BNA: Dublin Evening Packet, 15 Feb. 1842)

1842-02-15: Capture of Eugenia, 130 tons, with 531 slaves on board; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena. (Lords 1849, pg. 362)

1842-02-17: Capture of boat, unknown, — tons; vessel restored by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 362)

1842-02-18: Capture of Boa Harmonia, 80 tons, with 274 slaves on board; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena.
(Lords 1849, pg. 362)

1842-02-22:
The Army.
(Specially reported for the Evening Packet.)
  Lieutenant Macbean, on promotion, has left to join the St. Helena regiment at Winchester. This young gentleman was much and deservedly respected as Aide-de-Camp to his uncle, Lieutenant-General Sir Wm. Macbean, K.C.B., at Limerick.
(BNA: Dublin Evening Packet, 22 Feb. 1842)

1842-02-26: T.F. Elliot, Esq., and the Hon. E.E. Villiers wrote a despatch to J. Stephen, Esq., suggesting that the scale of diet recently established for ships sailing from England should be the one adopted for any ships dispatched under the Governor's authority. That diet should consist of the following daily allowances, children in proportion: 1 quart or 2 lbs. rice, or 1 lb. biscuit; 1/2 lb. salt beef, salt pork, or salt fish (the fish not to be issued oftener than on alternate days); 1/2 oz. coffee or cocoa; 1-1/4 oz. sugar; 1 oz. lime juice; 3/4 oz. sugar, for mixing with the above; 1/3 gill of palm oil; 1/4 gill or 1 oz. salt; 3 quarts of water; and a weekly allowance of 1/2 pint of vinegar.
    Messrs. Elliot and Villiers also observed that "in the case of the Africans already gone, the shippers paid for their clothing, but we believe that it is more consistent with the general views of Government not to follow this precedent, and not leave upon the importing colonies any other than the charges of transport." (Emigration, pg. 481)

1842-03-07: Parliament approved an increase in the new St. Helena regiment to 430 men. (BNA: Morning Post, 8 March 1842)

1842-03-11:
The Army.
(From the Limerick Chronicle of Wednesday.)
  The St. Helena Regiment has got buff facings.
(BNA: Dublin Evening Mail, 11 March 1842)

1842-03-11:
From the London Gazette, March 11.——War Office.
  St. Helena Regiment——Ensign David Douglas Wemyss, from 78th foot, to be Lieutenant, without purchase; Lieutenant William Frederick Macbean, to be Adjutant.
(BNA: Morning Post, 12 March 1842)

1842-03-11: Capture of boat, unknown, — tons; vessel restored by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 362)

1842-03-12: We understand the St. Helena Regiment, now stationed in our Barracks [at Winchester], will shortly be removed to the Albany Barracks, Isle of Wight.
(BNA: Hampshire Advertiser, 12 March 1842)

1842-03-12: Winchester. Saturday, March 12.
  The 16th Regiment, under the command of Col. Campbell, and the St. Helena Regiment, under Col. Simmonds, now in our Barracks, were on Wednesday last inspected by Gen. Sir Hercules Pakenham. It is rumoured that both Regiments will leave us shortly.
(BNA: Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 14 March 1842)

1842-03-18: Orders have been sent to re-occupy Albany barrack in the Isle of Wight. The St. Helena Regiment, now raising at Winchester, will, it is said, be quartered there. The hospital has for some time been occupied as a juvenile prison; the Commandant's house will be in consequence occupied as an hospital.
(BNA: Freeman's Journal, 18 March 1842)

1842-03-26: Newport, March 19.——The Albany Barracks exhibit a scene of great activity and bustle, a number of workmen being employed in repairing and otherwise getting every thing ready for the reception of the St. Helena regiment, about 600 of whom are expected in a day or two.
(BNA: Hampshire Advertiser, 26 March 1842)

1842-03-28: Winchester, March 28.——The St. Helena Regiment, commanded by Colonel Simmonds, will leave this garrison early on Monday morning, via railroad, for Southampton, from whence they will embark for Cowes, and afterwards proceed to Albany Barracks, near Newport. (BNA: Oxford Journal, 2 April 1842)

1842-03-30: The newly-raised St. Helena regiment will arrive at Portsmouth from Winchester on Monday, and be conveyed to Cowes, Isle of White [sic], in the Volcano, steam-vessel, whence they will march to, and be quartered in, Parkhurst barracks.
(BNA: Freeman’s Journal, 30 March 1842)

1842-04-01:
From Last Night's Gazette.——St. Helena Regiment.
  J. Stamforth,* Gent. to be  Ensign, without purchase, vice Thompson, whose appointment has been cancelled.
(BNA: West Kent Guardian, 2 April 1942)

* The Morning Post, 2 April 1842, printed this surname as Stainforth.

1842-04-01:
Portsmouth. Friday, April 1.
  About 400 of the St. Helena regiment arrived in Forton Barracks, Gosport, on Monday and Tuesday. ...
  The St. Helena regiment will be moved into Parkhurst Barracks, Isle of Wight, so that the men may be drilled before they sail.
(BNA: Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 4 April 1842)

1842-04-02:
The Army.
(Specially reported for the Evening Packet.)
  Royal St. Helena Regiment——Lieutenant D. Douglas Wemyss has arrived in Dublin from Winchester on leave.
(BNA: Dublin Evening Packet, 2 April 1842)

1842-04-02:
The Winchester Chronicle. Winchester, April 2.
  The entire of the St. Helena regiment left this week for Albany Barracks, Newport, Isle of Wight.
(BNA: Hampshire Advertiser, 2 April 1842)

1842-04-06: Capture of brigantine, unknown, 101 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured.
(Lords 1849, pg. 362)

1842-04-07:
The Army.
(Specially reported for the Evening Packet.)
  Royal St. Helena Regiment——Lieutenant D. Douglas Wemiss [sic] will embark for England April 8, to join the head-quarters in the Isle of Wight. (BNA: Dublin Evening Packet, 7 April 1842)

1842-04-08: Portsmouth, April 8.——The St. Helena regiment has been moved by steam to Cowes, and from thence marched to Parkhurst Barracks, where they will remain until tonnage is taken up to convey them to St. Helena.
(BNA: Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 11 April 1842)

1842-04-09: Portsmouth, April 9.——The Echo took part of the St. Helena Regiment from the Royal Clarence Yard, to Cowes, Isle of Wight. (BNA: Hampshire Advertiser, 9 April 1842)

1842-04-09:
The Army.
(Specially reported for the Evening Packet.)
  Royal St. Helena Regiment——Ensign J. Stainforth is on leave from the Isle of Wight. (BNA: Dublin Evening Packet, 9 April 1842)

1842-04-09:
The Army.
... The barracks at Parkhurst, Isle of Wight, being reported ready for the reception of troops, the St. Helena regiment will be removed from Gosport to Cowes as soon as the Volcano returns.
(BNA: Windsor and Eton Express, 9 April 1842)

1842-04-09: Capture of Africano, 88 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 362)

1842-04-12: Capture of schooner, unknown, 75 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 362)

1842-04-12: Capture of brigantine, unknown, 97 tons, with 413 slaves on board; seized by the Fantome; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena, 20 Dec. 1842; proceeds of sale in the registry of the High Court of Admiralty. (Lords 1849, pg. 362; Slave 1847, pg. 81)

1842-04-16: The St. Helena Regiment is being daily increased by recruits. The men appear to be very orderly and well-disciplined. (BNA: Hampshire Advertiser, 16 April 1842)

1842-04-22:
From the London Gazette, April 22.
War Office.
  St. Helena Regiment.——Surgeon Michael Fogarty, from the 64th Foot, to be Surgeon, vice Smith, who exchanges.
(BNA: Morning Post, 23 April 1842)

1842-04-22: The Resistance troop-ship, Commander Patey, is expected at this port to-morrow from Plymouth, to embark the St. Helena regiment [at Cowes], and to proceed to India with troops from the Cape of Good Hope. (BNA: London Standard, 22 April 1842)

1842-04-23:
The Royal Navy.
(From our Portsmouth Correspondent.)
  The Resistance, troop-ship, is expected in the course of the day from Plymouth, which port she left on Tuesday last. She will either embark the St. Helena Regiment, now lying in Parkhurst Barracks, in the Isle of Wight, or some of the troops ordered to the East Indies. (BNA: Morning Post, 23 April 1842)

1842-04-24:
Portsmouth, April 24.
(From our private correspondent.)
  The Resistance troop-ship, Commander Patey, which vessel arrived on Saturday from Plymouth, remains at Spithead waiting orders; her destination is certainly India, embarking the St. Helena Regiment at Cowes.  (BNA: London Standard, 25 April 1842)

1842-04-24: Capture of Jenaviva, 24 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 362)

1842-04-28: Capture of Minerva, 15 tons, with 126 slaves on board; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena. (Lords 1849, pg. 362)

1842-04-29:
Naval Intelligence.
(From our Correspondent.)
  The Resistance troop-ship, Commander G.E. Patey, will proceed to sea in a day or two. There is now very little doubt that it is the St. Helena Regiment that will embark in her. This Regiment, which is now complete, and lying at Parkhurst barracks, Isle of Wight, was inspected on Tuesday by the commander-in-chief of the District, Major-General Sir Hercules Pakenham, and is quite ready for embarkation. The General expressed much gratification at witnessing the efficient state of the regiment, which, from its being a newly-raised one, was highly creditable to the officers and men. (BNA: Morning Post, 29 April 1842)

1842-04-30: The Navy.——The Resistance is fully victualled, and has provisions for 800 men, exclusive of her own crew. It is understood that she will take out the St. Helena regiment, now lying in the Isle of Wight, to its destination, and then remove the regiment now lying at St. Helena to the Cape, and take the regiment stationed there to the East Indies.
(BNA: West Kent Guardian, 30 April 1842)

1842-05-05: Court Circular.——The Queen held a Levee yesterday afternoon at St. James's Palace. ... [After the introduction of the foreign diplomatic circle:] The general company were afterwards introduced, when the following had the honour of being presented to her Majesty:— ... Lieutenant Wemyss, St. Helena Regiment, by Colonel Wemyss. ...
(BNA: London Standard, 5 May 1842)

1842-05-06: The Slave Trade.——The following startling account of the extent to which the slave trade is still prosecuted, is from the New Bedford Mercury.
  Captain Borden, of the whale ship Sally Ann, who arrived at this port on Saturday last, from St. Helena, has furnished us with a list, carefully compiled by a friend at that place, of the slave vessels and number of slaves captured by H.R.M. vessels of war on the west coast of Africa, and taken to the island of St. Helena for adjudication, and condemned at that place during the period from July 3, 1840 to May 6, 1842. It cannot but excite surprise and indignation among our readers in learning of the great extent to which this nefarious practice is still carried on. The list before us includes thirty-two vessels, having on board at the time of their capture no less than five thousand one hundred and thirty-nine slaves. Of these, 1,736 have died; 1,332 have been conveyed to the Cape of Good Hope, 542 to Demarara, 120 to Jamaica, 201 to Trinidad, 198 have been apprenticed at St. Helena, and 1,010 remain to be sent, in accordance with their own choice to the British colonies. Of the thirty-four slavers, 28 were captured under Portuguese colors, 2 Brazilian, 1 Monte Video, and 3 English. Among the latter, is the brig Cypher, formerly of Salem, Mass. Source: Niles' National Register, Jeremiah Hughes, editor, Vol. LXI, 23 July 1842, pg. 324.

1842-05-06:
Portsmouth.
Friday, May 6.
  The St. Helena regiment are not quite ready for removal from the Isle of Wight; but it is expected that they will be so in the course of the ensuing week. The regiment consists of only five companies, commanded by a Lieut.-Colonel, and mustering about 500 officers and men. They will be stationed at the island whose name they bear. The companies of the 91st are to be removed to the Cape of Good Hope. (BNA: Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 9 May 1842)

1842-05-07:
Naval Intelligence.
(From our Correspondent.)
  The Resistance troop-ship, Commander G.E. Patey, is expected to embark the St. Helena Regiment the beginning of next week. It is stated that she will afterwards proceed to Cork, and embark some other troops under orders for the Cape of Good Hope.
(BNA: Morning Post, 7 May 1842)

1842-05-07:
Isle of Wight and General Yacht Club Gazette.
  Newport, May 7.——A Miss Neville, a child only eight years old, was introduced at a concert here on Monday last, and played the overtures to Zempa and Anaeron with wonderful effect on the piano. She likewise sang two songs and was encored. Several officers of the St. Helena regiment were there.
(BNA: Hampshire Advertiser, 7 May 1842)

1842-05-14:
The Portsmouth, Portsea, and Gosport Herald.
  The Resistance, troop ship, Com. Patey, is under orders to proceed to Quebec with the 23rd Fusiliers, and afterwards with the St. Helena Regiment from Albany Barracks.
(BNA: Hampshire Advertiser, 14 May 1842)

1842-05-14: The ship Chieftain, Captain Pattison, arrived at St. Helena. Because removals of liberated Africans were undertaken by private parties, Lieutenant Lean requested that one of the ship's surgeons, Mr. Rawlins, write "a very full account of his experience" during the sail to Trinidad. His Excellency Colonel Hamblin [sic] Trelawney, the Governor, Captain Pattison, and Mr. Rawlins proceeded first to "Rupert's Valley, the station allotted to men and boys," where the superintendent, Mr. Gunnel, mustered the Africans. "Having obtained our number of men, we next proceeded to Lemon Valley, the station allotted to the females and married couples. The women were reluctant and only after thirteen days' labour was a full complement of emigrants obtained."
(Immigration: Letter from Mr. Rawlins, late Surgeon of the Chieftain, to Lieutenant Lean, R.N., pp. 51-3)
    Note: Mr. Rawlins' observations are detailed and interesting. The report concludes with an outline of the dietary scale for the liberated Africans' passage to Trinidad.

1842-05-20:
Portsmouth. Friday, May 20.
  The St. Helena regiment, at Newport, I.W., are to be reviewed before they quit England, and will be presented with colours. (BNA: Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 23 May 1842)

1842-05-21:
Portsmouth.
Saturday, May 21, 1842.
  The Crocodile troop-ship, T. Elson, Esq., Commander, arrived on Thursday from Plymouth, to embark part of the St. Helena Regiment.
(BNA: Hampshire Telegraph, 23 May 1842)

1842-05-22:
Naval Intelligence.
Portsmouth, May 22.
  The Crocodile troop-ship, Master-Commander F. Elsom, arrived on Thursday from Plymouth. It is understood that the St. Helena regiment will be conveyed to their destination in her.
(BNA: Caledonian Mercury, 26 May 1842)

1842-05-26: Portsmouth.—The transport Abercrombie Robinson is hourly expected to touch at Spithead, from Cork. She takes out detachments of the 27th Regiment for the Cape of Good Hope, and also a portion of the St. Helena Regiment.
(BNA: Brighton Gazette, 26 May 1842)

1842-06: Four ships sailed in the spring of 1842, for the removal of 483 liberated Africans from St. Helena to the West Indies. These removals were undertaken "by private parties, under the sanction and with the general control of the Government." The Salsette was about to embark a party of emigrants to Jamaica. (Immigration, pg. 32)

1842-06-11: Two privates of the St. Helena Regiment named Richard Ellyott and Daniel Hyde, were last week fully committed to take their trials at the Sessions, for feloniously obtaining a quantity of groceries from Mr. W.W. Way, in the names of two of their officers. (BNA: Hampshire Advertiser, 11 June 1842)

1842-06-11:
The Portsmouth, Portsea, and Gosport Herald.
  Portsmouth, June 11.——The St. Helena Regiment will embark in about a month in the George the Fourth freight ship, now fitting out in the river. (BNA: Hampshire Advertiser, 11 June 1842)

1842-06-15:
The Army.
St. Helena Regiment.
  The George the Fourth freight ship, a very noble and commodious vessel, of 1,438 tons burthen, has been taken up for the conveyance of this corps to St. Helena. The period of her departure from this country is not as yet determined on.——United Service Gazette. (BNA: Dublin Evening Mail, 15 June 1842)

1842-06-17:
Portsmouth. Friday, June 17.
  The St. Helena Regiment, now drilling at Albany Barracks, in the Isle of Wight, have received their sailing orders, and are to embark in a ship called the "George the Fourth" of about 1300 tons. This Regiment, with women and children, will muster about 700. Each man that crosses the line is allowed two tons by the army regulations, so that the ship before-named will afford ample space. (BNA: Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 20 June 1842)

1842-06-18:
The Navy.
Portsmouth, Sunday.
... George the Fourth, which has been taken up by the Government, is expected here in a few days from the river and will embark the St. Helena regiment. (BNA: West Kent Guardian, 18 June 1842)

1842-06-24:
Portsmouth.
Friday, June 24.
  The St. Helena regiment have got their orders to proceed to their destination, and the "George the Fourth" freight-ship is daily expected to take them on board.
(BNA: Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 27 June 1842)

1842-06-27: Capture of Marianna, 87 tons; seized by the Acorn; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena, 5 Sept. 1842; proceeds applied towards payment of captors' expenses; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 362; Slave 1847, pg. 81)

1842-07-03: Capture of San Jozé, 94 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 362)

1842-07-06:
Isle of Wight Midsummer Quarter Sessions. ...
  Two privates in H.M. St. Helena regiment, named Richard Elliott and Daniel Hyde (both 21), pleaded guilty to indictments for obtaining various articles of grocery, from W.W. Way, under false pretences, and were sentenced to three months' hard labor.
(BNA: Hampshire Advertiser, 9 July 1842)

1842-07-07: Capture of Oito Decembre, 106 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 362)

1842-07-08: The Army.——The officers of the St. Helena Regiment to embark in the George the Fourth next week for that island are Lieut.-Colonel Simmonds, Major Thereau [sic], Brevet-Major; Capts. Wollard [sic] and Skinner; Lieutenants Imlah [sic], Jones, O'Dell, Stack, and Wemyss; Ensigns Hughes, Stephens, Butler, Cannon, and Stainforth; Quartermaster Miller, Lieut. and Adjutant Macbean; Surgeon Fogarty, and Assistant Surgeon Julian. The effective strength of the Corps at Albany Barracks consists of 26 sergeants, 10 drummers, 21 corporals, and 356 rank and file.
(BNA: Dublin Morning Register, 8 July 1842)

1842-07-18: The George the Fourth is to proceed on Friday or Saturday next, from the river to Portsmouth, to convey the St. Helena Regiment to its destination.——United Service Gazette.
(BNA: London Standard, 18 July 1842)

1842-07-22:
From the London Gazette, July 22.
War Office.
  St. Helena Regiment.——Capt. Hector Straith, from half pay Unattached, to be Captain, vice William Carruthers, who exchanges; Lieut. William Frances Hoey, from the 61st Foot, to be Captain, by purchase, vice Straith, who retires.
(BNA: Morning Post, 23 July 1842)

1842-07-22:
Friday, July 22.
War Office, July 22. ...
 To be Majors in the Army——Capt. H. Straith, of the St Helena Regiment; ... (BNA: The Examiner, 23 July 1842)

1842-07-22: Capture of Triumfo, 50 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 362)

1842-07-23:
Portsmouth.
Saturday, July 23, 1842.
  The ship George the Fourth is daily expected here from the river to carry the St. Helena regiment to its destination.
(BNA: Hampshire Telegraph, 25 July 1842)

1842-07-28:
The Army.
(Specially reported for the Evening Packet.)
  Royal St. Helena Regiment——The following officers have embarked at the Isle of Wight for St. Helena, in the George the Fourth——Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Simmonds, (commanding,) Major John Thoreau, Brevet Major Henry Edward O'Dell, Captains Gilbert Wollard and F. Napean Skinner, Lieutenants Alexander Imlach, (Acting Paymaster,) Ths. [sic] Jones, Frederick Rice Stack, and David Douglas Wemyss; Ensigns Robert John Hughes, Thomas Picton Stephens, C. Richard Butler, John Smith Cannon, and John Stainforth; Quartermaster Wm. Miller, Lieutenant and Adjutant Macbean, Surgeon Fogarty, and Assistant-Surgeon Henry Julian. Effective strength——Ten sergeants, ten drummers, and 600 rank and file. (BNA: Dublin Evening Packet, 28 July 1842)

1842-07-29:
Portsmouth, July 29.
(From our private correspondent.)
  The freight ship George the Fourth is at present lying at Spithead, receiving government biscuit for China, which she will deposit at Hong Kong, after landing at St. Helena the newly raised regiment, named the "St. Helena Regiment," at present quartered at Newport barracks, which is under orders for embarkation next week.
(BNA: London Standard, 30 July 1842)

1842-07-30:
Newport, July 30.
Petty Sessions. (Saturday).
  Before the Rev. R.W. White, and a full bench of Magistrates.——Two countrymen, named George Young and William Dyer, were charged with persuading and inducing a man, named Jas. Chamberlayne, to desert from Her Majesty's St. Helena Regiment. It appeared that about three months ago, on a Sunday, the soldier, (a private) fell in company with the two prisoners at a public-house, and in the course of conversation they advised him not to go away with the regiment, and offered to supply him with clothes if he would take his own off and desert. After being about for many hours, they went to Rowborough Farm about three o'clock on Monday morning, and there the soldier was rigged out in a sleeve waistcoat, an old pair of trowsers, and an old straw hat. Thus attired, he left the Island, and has since been tramping all over the country, being taken only a few days ago, when he made the statements which caused Dyer and Young to be apprehended. Prisoners said, in defence, they had never seen the man. They were committed to take their trial at the Quarter Sessions; but bail was ultimately allowed for their appearance. (BNA: Hampshire Advertiser, 30 July 1842)

    See also "Apprehension of a Daring Character," in the 12th May 1843 edition of the Lincolnshire Chronicle, pg. 4.

1842-08-01: Capture of Isabel, — tons; seized by the Frolic; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena, 8 Nov. 1842; vessel wrecked, no proceeds of sale; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 362; Slave 1847, pg. 81)

1842-08-04:
The Portsmouth, Portsea, and Gosport Herald.
  Portsmouth, August 6.——The Echo, steam tug, embarked the St. Helena Regiment at Cowes on Thursday, at two trips, and put them on board the George the Fourth, freight ship, at Spithead,——their baggage having been previously brought by the Falmouth lighter.
(BNA: Hampshire Advertiser, 7 Aug. 1842)

1842-08-05:
Naval Intelligence.
(From our Correspondent.)
  Portsmouth, Friday.——The George the Fourth, having taken in the whole of the bread intended for the use of the naval and military forces in China, the St. Helena Regiment embarked on board of her yesterday afternoon. The troops were conveyed from the Isle of Wight to Spithead by the Echo steamer. The George the Fourth will sail this evening, or early to-morrow morning.
(BNA: Morning Post, 6 Aug. 1842)

1842-08-07:
Portsmouth, Aug. 7.
(From our private correspondent.)
  Sailed this morning, the George the Fourth, of 1400 tons, freight-ship, having on board the St. Helena regiment for the island. The George the Fourth, having landed the newly raised regiment at St. Helena, will proceed to China with biscuit for the use of the men of war and troops.
(BNA: London Standard, 8 Aug. 1842)

1842-08-07: Capture of Bella Indianna, 39 tons; seized by the Waterwitch; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena, 22 Sept. 1842; proceeds applied towards captors' expenses; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 362, Slave 1847, pg. 81)

1842-08-11: Capture of Nossa Senhora da Juda, — tons, with 63 slaves on board; seized by the Waterwitch; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena, 22 Sept. 1842; vessel destroyed, no proceeds. (Lords 1849, pg. 362; Slave 1847, pg. 81)

1842-08-13: Capture of schooner, unknown, 40 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 362).

1842-08-20: Capture of Eugenia, — tons; seized by the Pantaloon; vessel restored by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena, 26 Oct. 1812; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 362; Slave 1847, pg. 81)

1842-08-28: Capture of Gentil Africano, 144 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 362)

1842-09: Death of S. Jones, formerly Anglican chaplain at St. Helena, aged 69. Source: The Church of England Magazine, Vol. XIII, Sept. 1842, pg. 216.

1842-09-21: Capture of Duqueza de Mindello, 85-1/2 tons; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 362)

1842-10-04: The George the Fourth arrived at St. Helena with the St. Helena regiment on the 4th ult. all well.
(BNA: Hampshire Advertiser, 3 Dec. 1842)


    Note: The use of the abbreviated latin, ult., in this article implies that the 4th November was the date of arrival. In fact, it was the 4th October, after a voyage of 58 days. (SHII: The St. Helena Regiment)

1842: The garrison consisted of a battery of Artillery in addition to the St. Helena Regiment. (Mellis, pg. 32)

1842-10-14: Capture of Amizade Feliz, 73 tons; seized by the Grecian; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena, 16 Jan. 1843; vessel destroyed, no proceeds of sale; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 362; Slave 1847, pg. 81)

1842-10-18: Capture of Princeza Dona Francisca alias Maria Caroina, 392 tons; seized by the Grecian; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena, 27 Feb. 1843; proceeds of sale applied towards payment of captors' expenses; — slaves captured.
(Lords 1849, pg. 362; Slave 1847, pg. 81)

1842-11-07: Capture of three boats, 20 tons aggregate, with 15 slaves on board; seized by the Acorn; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena, 7 Sept. 1843; boats destroyed, no proceeds of sale. (Lords 1849, pg. 363; Slave 1847, pg. 81)

1842-11-12: Capture of Josefina, 62 tons, with 314 slaves on board; seized by the Waterwitch; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena, 24 Dec. 1842; proceeds applied towards payment of captors' expenses. (Lords 1849, pg. 363; Slave 1847, pg. 81)

1842-11-16: After a voyage to China, Thomas Worthington King arrived at the island of St. Helena. Mr. King described the landing and the approach to the James Town as follows:

    We landed at a jetty queer enough—the boat is backed & you swing yourself ashore by a rope suspended from an iron crane—there is no beach. A street, or road leads to the gate, where has been a portcullis, but the drawbridge only remains. This is hoisted every night, even now in time of peace.
    The town gate is several hundred yards further on—along the right side of the road are ranged long 32 pounders, with shot & shells—together with two or three mortars—these command the entire roadstead. The town gate is immensely large, swung on a stone arch of twelve feet in thickness. Entering, the village lays before you——and a beautiful little spot it is——the long street rising gradually, is clean as a floor, on either side are the houses of the residents—quarters for the guards & buildings for govt. & stores.

    Captain Holmes and the Misses Mary Anne and Eleanor Legg accompanied Mr. King on a tour of Napoleon's tomb and to Longwood. Of the St. Helena Regiment, he wrote:

  There is a regiment of the Queens [sic] troops here numbering eight hundred—fine looking men & amply sufficient I should imagine to guard the entire Island from any hostile attack.

Source: Journal of a Voyage around the World: A Year on the Ship Helena, by Thomas Worthington King, edited by Steven E. Kagle (The Ohio State University, 2003) pg. 211.

1842-11-17: Birth: On the 17th instant, at Newtown Lodge, the residence of his uncle, John Edward Redmond, Esq., the lady of Captain Hoey, of the St. Helena Regiment, of a son.
(BNA: Wexford Independent, 19 Nov. 1842)

1842-11-23: Capture of Somariva, 116 tons; seized by the Waterwitch; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena, 5 Jan. 1843; proceeds of sale applied towards payment of captors' expenses; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 363; Slave 1847, pg. 81)

1842-11-23: Capture of Flor de Verāo, 46 tons; seized by the Waterwitch; vessel condemned by the Vice-Admiralty Court of St. Helena, 5 Jan. 1843; proceeds of sale paid to captors; — slaves captured. (Lords 1849, pg. 363; Slave 1847, pg. 81)

1842: "Officers and men soon became integrated into Island society. There were practical reasons for this. They were not ‘birds of passage’ like other regiments of the line, but men who had volunteered to serve at least five years in the Regiment, with inducements to remain longer, some indeed staying for over twenty years. Officers became involved in local government and many men of all ranks married into local families.
    "Unfortunately there was a downside to garrison service on St. Helena on at least two counts. One related to the shortage of fresh food for the garrison at prices the Army could afford. To meet this problem the Commander-in-Chief, Lord Hill, ordered that the Regiment be allotted 'garden ground' for the men to grow their own vegetables, but this was resented by local tradesmen, who were backed by the Governor. Consequently the land was withdrawn, creating bad feeling between the Regiment and the Castle, and misunderstandings in Whitehall between the War Office and the Colonial Office, to the detriment of the Regiment’s good name.
    "The other disadvantage to St. Helena service affected the men more seriously. The Island suffered from a shortage of reliable labour and skilled craftsmen, making it difficult for the Royal Engineers, for example, to maintain the defences and Island infrastructure, such as roads. Enough labour could not even be hired at times to load or unload men-of-war and military transports, including naval colliers. No doubt the recently emancipated slaves, rejoicing in their freedom, had little relish to work for military taskmasters, and so the Army had only one source of ‘forced labour’ to call upon: the rank and file of the St. Helena Regiment. The need for them to be tall and fit soon became apparent as the men had to endure heavy manual work as well as their regimental and guard duties, making it a demoralising experience of military service. ...
    "The St Helena Regiment soldiers lived in barracks in Jamestown.
     "It was due to the high proportion of Irish soldiers of the SHR, that Jamestown has a Catholic Church: the church was actually built by the Irishmen of the SHR." (SHII: The Old Saints)
    Note: There was not a Roman Catholic church on the island of St. Helena until at least 1884, when Father Hayes was struggling to get one built. A subscription was in progress in that year for the purpose.
Source: The United States Army and Navy Journal and Gazette of the Regular and Volunteer Forces, Vol. XXI (19 July 1884), pg. 1046.

1842: Vital statistics for the island of St. Helena included 157 births, 19 marriages, and 119 deaths. "The Deaths in 1842 included 11 soldiers in the Garrison, 4 soldiers, strangers, 1 seaman, R.N., and 15 Merchant seamen."
    There were eight schools, attended and instructed, as follows:

  • Format: Locality; description of school; no. schools; method of instruction; mode and amount of support: by government, by voluntary contributions.
  • James Town; Colonial Grammar school; 50 males, 0 females, total 50; in classes; £230, £0.
  • James Town; Lower School; 59 males, 73 females, total 132; Bell's System; £130, £0.
  • James Town; Infant school; 17 males, 65 females, total 82; Wilderspin's System; £0, £38.
  • James Town; Evening school; 49 males, 19 females, total 67; Usual method of instruction; £0, £37.
  • James Town; Free school; 63 males, 31 females, total 94; Usual; £0, £0.
  • Near Plantation Church; Central Free school; 50 males, 33 females, total 83; National; £130, £0.
  • Sandy Bay; Free school; 20 males, 19 females, total 39; Usual method of instruction; £0, £23.
  • Hut's Gate; Free school; 18 males, 17 females, total 35; Usual; £0, £40.

    Imports for the year totalled £77,815. The top items, in terms of pounds sterling, were: Sugar, £14,564; Wine, £8,509; Elephants' teeth, £8,000; Rice, £4,881; Live stock, £3,501; Musk, £3,500; Salt provisions, £2,988; Flour, £2,488; Beer, £2,098; Cottons and linens, £2,047; and, Slops, £1,974.
    The island of St. Helena was a net importer, as its exports totalled £43,851. The highest value exports included: Sugar, £11,826; Ivory, £8,011; Musk, £3,500; Vegetables, £2,101; Salt provisions, £1,931; and, Coffee, £1,375.

    During 1842, St. Helena received 814 incoming ships; outbound ships numbered 752. Of the ships touching at St. Helena during the year, 28 were vessels of war, 756 were merchant vessels, and 70 were whalers.

    Land under cultivation or available for pasturage amounted to about 7,500 acres. The remaining 24,500 acres consisted of barren land and rock, "available in part only for pasturage of sheep and goats." The island's inventory of live stock comprised 155 horses, 813 horned cattle, 2,779 sheep, and 292 goats. "Goats formerly were numerous, but in 1812 they were all destroyed by law, with the view of allowing the indigenous trees to spring up; very few of these, however, have grown in the barren parts of the Island, and goats are again encouraged."

Source: Great Britain. Houses of Parliament. Tables of the Revenue, Population, Commerce, &c. of the United Kingdom, and its Dependencies. Part XII. (London: W. Clowes and Sons, 1844), pp. 404-7.

Please cite your sources.

Previous: Timeline for the year 1841.
Next: Timeline for the year 1843.

This page was first published on the 7th July 2015; subsequently edited, 13th July 2015.

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© Alison Kilpatrick, 2015. All rights reserved.
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"The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there."—Lesley Poles Hartley (1895–1972), The Go-Between (1953).

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