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Timeline for the parishes of Kilrea & Tamlaght O'Crilly, 1840 – 1844.

Please refer to Note and References at bottom of page.
Return to Kilrea & Tamlaght O'Crilly timeline front page.


Year
Events
Sources; Comments; Links
1840–1876
(1) The Mercers' Company operated a loan fund for tenants.
(2) The following amounts were lent out:
- 1831 to 1840, £200;
- 1841 to 1850, £1,785;
- 1851 to 1860, £576 4s 10d;
&c.
(1) PRONI ref. D974, per index entry in the online catalogue, www.proni.gov.uk (accessed 2015-01-20).
(2) Link to table of the Mercers' accounting of expenditures made on the Kilrea estate, between 1831-1889.

Note:
In 1882, when Robert Stuart made a presentation to the Deputation from Companies' Irish Estates, on behalf of the tenants of the Kilrea estate, he described the borrowing process as follows: "When a tenant wants a loan he travels sometimes five miles to lodge his application. In a week after he comes again to know if he has been successful. If so, he brings with him two solvent securities. He gets the money, 6d. in the pound being deducted from it. He pays it back in five monthly payments, each time walking perhaps 10 miles. The two other banks charge a higher rate of interest--one of them 1s. in the pound; the other, I think, charges 9d., but they all do a good business. They are sources of great evil and much misery to the farmers."
Link to statement by Robert Stuart.
1840–1880
Miss S.J. Ferrier was the principal of Kilrea Girls' School.
The Fairy Thorn (1984), pg. 48.
1840
  "The first National School in the district was Drumagarner … situated on church land beside Drumargarner chapel. ... The school was a two-storied building, each floor measuring 28' by 17'."
  The Reastown school "came under the National Board and the first teacher was Theophillus O'Neill."
The Fairy Thorn (1984), pp. 52, 55.
1840
James Kilpatrick (or McIlfatrick), a member of the Reformed Presbyterian Church at Drimbolg, emigrated to Sydney, Australia.
The Covenanter (1853), pg. 187: article describes James Kilpatrick's efforts to commence in farming in Australia, and how he raised a little church on his farm.
Link to transcription.
1840-01-18
A legal notice was published in the Northern Whig, of an impending election of Guardians of the Poor for the several Electoral Divisions in Ballymoney Poor Law Union.
Northern Whig, 21 January 1840.
Link to transcription.

See also entry under 1840-01-25, "(1) The Ballymoney Poor Law Union..."
1840-01-21
Meeting of the inhabitants of the united parishes of Kilrea and Desertoghill, in Drumagarner, the Rev. Samuel Auterson in the Chair, and Mr. Peter M'Alister, Secretary. The objects of the meeting were: "to take into consideration the propriety of transmitting an address to her Majesty, Queen Victoria;" to petition Parliament for an extension of the elective franchise," and reform of the Irish municipal corporations; and, to express their "utter detestation of the base and atrocious calumnies heaped on the Catholic people and priesthood of Ireland by the Tory party and press in England." This petition, along with others from many other parishes, were presented by Mr. O'Connell to Parliament.
Vindicator, 22 January 1840.
Link to transcription.
Dublin Weekly Register, 15 Feb. 1840 (editorial).
Link to transcription.
1840-01-25
(1) The Ballymoney Poor Law Union (PLU) came into operation.
(2) The first election of Poor Law Guardians was held for Ballymoney PLU. Local guardians included: John Kennedy, Tamlaght; Creighton Hutchinson, Moneygran; James Johnson, Drumard; Alex Gilmore, Boveday; Washington Smith, Moyagney; Joseph Henderson, Lislea; Arthur Church, Dullaghy; and Michael Mulloy, Claragh.

(1) Poor Law Commissioners' Report (1844),
pp. 518ff.
(2) The Fairy Thorn Revisited (1996), pg. 59.

Note: The Ballymoney PLU included all of the townlands in the parish of Kilrea, viz.: Claragh, Erganagh, Fallahogy, Kilrea, town of Kilrea, Lislea, Movanagher, Moyagoney, Moynock, and Mullan.

See also entry under 1840-01-18, "A legal notice was published..."
1840-02-04
A sermon was preached by the Rev. Francis Wilson, of Killemure, in Kilrea Presbyterian Secession Church; after which, the Rev. Joseph Dickey, youngest son of the Rev. William Dickey, of Carnone, was unanimously chosen to be the future Pastor of that congregation.
Belfast News-Letter, 14 February 1840.
Link to transcription.
1840-03-31
(1) The Rev. Joseph Dickey was ordained the new minister of 2nd Kilrea Presbyterian.
(2) Mr. Dickey cleared the remaining £50 of the debt incurred in the construction of a building for the congregation.
(1) Kernohan (1912), pg. 43.
(2) The Fairy Thorn (1984), pg. 74.

Belfast News-Letter, 14 April 1840, for an account of the proceedings.
Link to transcription.
1840-04-15
The parish of Kilrea presented a petition in favour of alteration of the law governing church patronage, to the House of Commons.
Caledonian Mercury, 20 April 1840.
Link to transcription.
1840-04-26
Meeting of the inhabitants of the united parishes of Kilrea and Desertoghill (Roman Catholic), at Drumagarner, the Rev. Samuel Auterson in the Chair, Mr. John O'Regan, Secretary. The object of the meeting was to obtain a petition against Lord Stanley's registration bill, for presentation to Parliament.
Freeman's Journal, 1 May 1840.
Link to transcription.
1840-08-07
Day of public thanksgiving, observed by the Presbyterians of Kilrea, on the occasion of the union of the Synod of Ulster and the  Secession Synod.
Derry Journal, 14 August 1840.
Link to transcription.
Enniskillen Chronicle, 20 August 1840.
Link to transcription.
1840-11-17
The new Presbyterian church at Churchtown, in the parish of Tamlaght O'Crilly, was opened for public worship by the Rev. Dr. Cooke, of Belfast.
Belfast News-Letter, 27 November 1840.
Link to transcription.

See also entries under 1835-09-21, "The Presbytery of Magherafelt attended...," and 1836-01-23, "Churchtown Presbyterian was built, ..."
1841
The population of the town of Kilrea was 1,191, occupying 195 houses (up from 1215 and 191 in 1831, and 973 and 110 in 1821); eighteen houses were not occupied, and one was in progress of building. 1841 census statistics for the townlands of the parish of Kilrea, situated within the barony of Loughinsholin, follow:
Format: Area; Population; Number of houses inhabited, unoccupied, building, total.
- Claragh: 673A. 3R. 36P.; 365; 67, 1, 0, 68.
- Erganagh: 317A. 3R. 25P.; 174; 26, 0, 0, 26.
- Fallahogy: 388A. 3R. 21P.; 141; 30, 1, 0, 31.
- Kilrea: 743A. 1R. 16P.; 227; 35, 1, 0, 36.
- Lislea: 917A. 3R. 38P.; 467; 81, 4, 0, 85.
- Moneygran: 748A. 0R. 20P.; 374; 57, 1, 0, 58.
- Moyagoney: 740A. 1R. 20P.; 319; 60, 3, 0, 63.
- Moyknock: 611A. 2R. 29P.; 347; 57, 0, 0, 57.
- Sub-totals, including the town of Kilrea: 5,142A. 0R. 36P.; 3,605; 608, 29, 1, 638.
Note: The remainder of the parish is in the barony of Coleraine; the entire parish contains 3,437 persons. 1841 census statistics for the townlands situated within the barony of Coleraine:
- Movanagher: 606A. 3R. 8P.; 418; 78, 0, 0, 78.
- Mullan: 425A. 0R. 6P.; 204; 35, 0, 0, 35.
- Subtotals: 1,033A. 3R. 14P.; 622; 113, 0, 0, 113.
The Fairy Thorn (1984), pg. 20 (re: population figures for the town of Kilrea).
Kernohan (1912), pg. 45 (re: number of tenements in the town of Kilrea).
Census of Ireland, 1851, pp. 232, 241 (details for townlands).
1841
The population of the parish of Tamlaght O'Crilly was 8,301. 1841 census statistics for the townlands and villages of the parish, situated within the barony of Loughinsholin, follow:
Format: Area; Population; Number of houses inhabited, unoccupied, building, total.
- Ballymacpeake, Lower: 662A. 3R. 25P.; 399; 76, 8, 0, 84.
- Ballynian: 537A. 2R. 11P.; 313; 55, 2, 0, 57.
- Drumagarner: 596A. 0R. 19P.; 366; 70, 3, 0, 73.
- Drumane: 508A. 1R. 26P.; 254; 42, 0, 0, 42.
- Drumard: 655A. 2R. 14P.; 304; 58, 0, 0, 58.
- Drumlane: 658A. 2R. 27P.; 328; 59, 1, 0, 60.
- Drumnacanon: 747A. 0R. 19P.; 387; 68, 3, 0, 71.
- Drumoolish: 487A. 0R. 20P.; 338; 61, 7, 0, 68.
- Eden: 755A. 0R. 18P.; 388; 64, 4, 0, 68.
- Glenone: 825A. 0R. 27P.; 557; 97, 3, 0, 100.
- Gortmacrane: 768A. 0R. 10P.; 646; 119, 0, 0, 119.
- Inishrush: 692A. 2R. 23P.; 360; 59, 5, 1, 65.
- Killygullib Glebe: 966A. 2R. 39P.; 807; 140, 5, 0, 145.
- Killymuck Glebe: 572A. 2R. 0P.; 383; 70, 1, 0, 71.
- Lisgorgan Glebe: 179A. 1R. 16P.; 140; 26, 1, 0, 27.
- Lismoyle: 925A. 2R. 1P.; 323; 63, 1, 0, 64.
- Lisnagroat: 906A. 3R. 15P.; 392; 70, 1, 0, 71.
- Moneysallin: 702A. 0R. 22P.; 322; 54, 2, 0, 56.
- Moneystaghan, Ellis: 496A. 2R. 18P.; 404; 78, 3, 0, 81.
- Moneystaghan, Macpeake: 410A. 0R. 27P.; 189; 36, 2, 0, 38.
- Mullaghnamoyagh: 89A. 3R. 0P.; 62; 11, 0, 0, 11.
- Timaconway: 494A. 1R. 21P.; 277; 50, 2, 0, 52.
- Tyanee: 1,719A. 1R. 11P.; 1,036; 189, 6, 0, 195.
- Inishrush village: ———; 182; 38, 6, 0, 44.
- Portglenone town (part of): ———; 247; 42, 3, 0, 45.
- Tamlaght village: ———; 211; 40, 4, 0, 44.
- Subtotals: 15,457A. 3R. 9P.; 9,615; 1735, 73, 1, 1809.
Note: The remainder of the town of Portglenone is in the parish of Ahoghill, barony of Toome, Lower, county Antrim.

1841 census statistics for the townlands situated within the barony of Coleraine:
- Bovedy: 908A. 2R. 0P.; 640; 120, 4, 0, 124.
- Drumsaragh: 426A. 0R. 14P.; 205; 33, 1, 0, 34.
- Subtotals: 1,334A. 2R. 14P.; 845; 153, 5, 0, 158.
Census of Ireland, 1851, pp. 243-4.
1841
The Church at Greenlough was rebuilt, under the parish priest, Father M'Laughlin.
Parish of Greenlough (2006).
1841
The Boys' School at Drumagarner was opened on the lower floor.
The Fairy Thorn (1984), pg. 52.
1841-01-15
The house of Francis Cassidy, in Killygullib Glebe, parish of Tamlaght O'Crilly, burnt down, killing himself, who had been confined to bed with illness, and three of his infant children.
Belfast News-Letter, 22 January 1841.
Link to transcription.
1841-03-09
Death of John Henderson, Esq., of Kilrea, Seneschal of the Manor of the Mercers' Company, from 1803-41.
Belfast News-Letter, 2 April 1841.
Link to transcription.
1841-05-23
The parish of Tamlaght O'Crilly (Roman Catholic) met, the Rev. John M'Laughlin, in the chair, and "adopted a series of resolutions in accordance with those of the general [anti-Tory] movement, and an address to the Queen."
Vindicator, 2 June 1841.
Link to transcription.
1841-06-10
Anti-Tory meetings were held in Kilrea and Desertoghill, and other places in Ulster.
Dublin Monitor, 10 June 1841.
1841-06-12
Petitions were submitted by the Presbyterians of Ireland, totalling 33,192 signatures--including 161 from 1st Kilrea, and 133 from Boveedy--for the abolition of patronage in the Church of Scotland.
Belfast News-Letter, 2 July 1841.
(Names of the signatories were not listed.)
1841-09-22
H.J. Heyland, Esq. published a legal notice of intent to sell the townland of Gortmacrane, parish of Tamlaght O'Crilly.
Northern Whig, 17 August 1841.
Link to transcription.
1841-10
At Kilrea, the Rev. Mr. Mooney was working towards the establishment of a news-room for teetotallers.
Dublin Monitor, 26 October 1841.
Link to transcription.
1841-11-30
The Rev. William Denham was ordained "as assistant and successor to the Rev. A. Boyle, in the pastoral charge of the Presbyterian congregation of Boveedy."
Kernohan (1912), pg. 64.
Freeman's Journal, 10 December 1841.
Link to transcription.
1841-12-21
W.H. Holmes, Esq., agent to the Mercers' Company in Kilrea, advertised a house in Swatragh, with ten acres, to set for lease--"on condition of being employed as an Inn for the accommodation of Travellers."
Belfast News-Letter, 21 December 1841.
Link to transcription.
1841–1848
Patrick Mulholland was the principal of Drumagarner National School.
The Fairy Thorn (1984), pg. 52.
1842
(1) The Roman Catholic church at Drumagarner, St. Mary's, was rebuilt.
(2)
Under Father Samuel Oterson [Auterson], the church at Drumagarner was rebuilt at a site just west of the old church. "The Mercers' Company contributed £200 to the erection of the church. ... When the new church was completed, the graveyard was extended and the stones of the old church used to build the surrounding wall."
(1) The Fairy Thorn Revisited (1996), pg. 110.
(2)
Research by Mrs. Kathleen Gillen; cited in The Fairy Thorn (1984), pg. 83.
1842-01-20
The Magherafelt Poor Law Union (PLU) struck its first poor rate, totalling £3,766 18s. 7d, of which £22 1s. 8d. was deemed uncollectible in early 1844.
Poor Law Commissioners' Report (1844),
pp. 518ff.
1842-03-10
The Magherafelt Union Workhouse was declared fit for the reception of paupers, and admitted its first inmates the following day. The workhouse was built to accommodate 900 inmates, at a cost of £6,600. The 6 acre site was demised to the Magherafelt PLU by the Salters' Company, at a nominal rent.
The Workhouse, online at workhouses.org.uk (accessed 2015-01-22).
Poor Law Commissioners' Report (1844),
pp. 518ff.

Note: The Magherafelt PLU included the following townlands in the parish of Tamlaght O'Crilly: Ballymacpeake Lower, Eden, Glenone, Inishrush, Inishrush (town), Moneystaghan Ellis, Moneystaghan Macpeake, Mullaghnamoyagh, Portglenone (county Derry side of the river Bann), Tamlaght O'Crilly (town), and Tyanee.
1842-06-11
Two children and Miss Shaw, of Kilrea, were rescued from drowning in one of the lakes adjoining the town. Miss Shaw was rescuscitated by Drs. Hunter and Church.
Belfast News-Letter, 21 June 1842.
Link to transcription.
1842-07-12
Orange processions took place at Kilrea, the "plains," Agivey, and Boveedy, with "the firing of shots, the ringing of the church and meeting-house bells, and the hoisting of garlands on the tops of houses, &c."
Dublin Monitor, 22 July 1842.
Link to transcription.
1842-08-05
A public meeting was held in Coleraine, for the purpose of organizing a branch of the Society for the Promotion and Improvement of the Growth of Flax in Ireland, to embrace in its circuit Newtownlimavady, Garvagh, Kilrea, Ballymoney, Bushmills, Dervock, Portstewart, &c.
Northern Whig, 11 August 1842.
1842-08-24
Murder of a boy named George Marlin, in Kilrea. The Lords Justices offered a reward of £100 for the apprehension and conviction of the murderers. On the 2d September, John Paul was charged, on the oath of James M'Auley, as being the person who struck the fatal blow. At the Londonderry Assizes, held 23rd March 1843, John Paul was found guilty, and sentenced to twelve months' imprisonment.
Dublin Monitor, 2 September 1842. (murder)
Kerry Examiner, 13 September 1842. (reward)
Northern Whig, 13 September 1842. (charges)
Northern Whig, 28 March 1843. (trial)
1842-09
Meetings were held, sermons preached, and collections made in behalf of the London Hibernian School Society, at Dungannon, Antrim, Kilrea, Tamlaght O'Crilly, Banbridge, and Grenshaw.
Belfast News-Letter, 20 September 1842.
Link to transcription.
1842-11-15
The Ballymoney Union Workhouse was deemed fit for the reception of paupers. The workhouse was built to accommodate 700 inmates, at a cost of £6,785, plus £1,240 for fixtures and fittings, &c. The Ballymoney Poor Law Union struck its first poor rate, in the amount of £3,042 8s. 3-1/2d.
The Workhouse, online at workhouses.org.uk (accessed 2015-01-22).
Poor Law Commissioners' Report (1844),
pp. 518ff.

1843
The Girls' School at Drumagarner was opened on the upper floor.
The Fairy Thorn (1984), pg. 52.
1843
"Movanagher Schools [for boys and girls] were  built by the Mercers' Co. in 1843 at a cost of over £600. The first teachers were William and Mrs. Frances Hosford."
The Fairy Thorn (1984), pg. 53.
1843
Kilrea became an auxiliary of the Ulster Society for Promoting the Education of the Deaf and Dumb, and the Blind. "The Mercers' Company gave a donation of £100 when it was instituted, and they are still life members."
Article written by Miss Jane Clarke, July 1912, for the Northern Constitution, and cited in The Fairy Thorn (1984), pg. 45.
1843-01-19
The Magherafelt Poor Law Union struck its second poor rate, totalling £2,315 9s. 1d.
Poor Law Commissioners' Report (1844),
pp. 518ff.
1843-03-06
(1) The Ballymoney Union Workhouse admitted its first inmates.
(2) The Ballymoney Union Workhouse opened for the reception of paupers. The Poor Law Union incurred a debt of £8,500, advanced by the Lords of the Treasury, for the building of the workhouse.
(3) "It was divided into three blocks--the admission building, the workhouse and the infirmary. The rules of admission were very strict and the treatment of the inmates left a lot to be desired. Hence the great reluctance of the majority of the population in Ireland to use the services of any workhouse."
(1) The Workhouse, online at workhouses.org.uk (accessed 2015-01-22).
(2) Coleraine Chronicle, 18 May 1844.
(3) The Fairy Thorn Revisited (1996), pg. 59.

Poor Law Commissioners' Report (1844),
pp. 518ff.

Note: In the county of Londonderry, the Ballymoney Poor Law Union included the parish of Kilrea, the northern portion of the parish of Tamlaght O'Crilly, and portions of the parishes of Aghadowey, Ballymoney, and Desertoghill.
1843-03-17
Murder of John Richey, of Gortmacrane, parish of Tamlaght O'Crilly.
Freeman's Journal, 11 July 1843. (man charged)
Link to transcription.

See also entry under 1843-07-04, "Capture of John M'Loughlin, ..."
1843-04-22
The daughter of a Mr. O'Briens, of Tyanee, parish of Tamlaght O'Crilly, died of an accidental gunshot wound.
Northern Whig, 22 April 1843.
Link to transcription.
1843-04-28
Presentation and address to William Henry Holmes, Esq., agent to the Mercers' Company of the Kilrea estate, by the tenantry, proposed availing themselves of the restoration of Mr. Holmes from an alarming illness, and to express their attachment and respect for him.
Belfast News-Letter, 28 April 1843.
Link to transcription.
1843-07-04
Capture of John M'Loughlin, who had been charged with the murder of John Richey, of Gortmacrane, on 17th March, by the police sergeant's wife, at the barrack in Kilrea.
Freeman's Journal, 11 July 1843.
Link to transcription.
1843-08-21
A deputation of the Ulster Society for Promoting the Education of the Deaf and Dumb, and the Blind, attended Kilrea. A meeting was held, the Rev. Thomas Lindsay, rector of Kilrea, in the chair. Also in attendance were the Revds. Augustus Minchin, curate of Kilrea, Joseph Dickie, junior, H.W. Rodgers, James Denham, Andrew Todd, and Smylie Robinson; Doctor Clarke, and — Lane, Esq. An auxiliary was established, with the following office-bearers: Patrons, William Holmes, Esq., and the Worshipful the Mercers' Company; President, the Rev. Thomas Lindesay; Treasurer, Park Holmes, Esq.; Secretaries, the Revds. M.C. Motherwell, curate of Tamlaght O'Crilly, H.W. Rodgers, and Andrew Todd; Committee: the Revds. William Napper, rector of Tamlaght O'Crilly, Joseph Dickie, James Denham, and Mr. Wallace. A collection was taken, and pupils were examined.
Northern Whig, 26 August 1843.
Link to transcription.
1843
Extensive failures of the potato crop in England, caused by over ripened seed raised in the season of 1842.
Coleraine Chronicle, 1844-05-18, citing the Quarterly Journal of Agriculture.
1843-09-05
Meeting at Kilrea, for the improvement of the growth of flax in the district; Alexander Clarke, Esq., Upperlands, in the Chair. The Chairman and Mr. Skinner addressed the meeting. A resolution was passed to form an auxiliary branch of the Belfast Flax Improvement Society for this district. A second resolution was passed, appointing managers of the auxiliary: William H. Holmes, Esq., President; Alexander Clarke, Esq., Vice-President. Committee: Parke Holmes, Esq., George Dunbar, Esq., Mayor of Belfast, Andrew Orr, Esq., John Church, Esq., Rev. Thomas Lindsay, Rev. Hugh W. Rodgers, Joseph Clarke, Esq., M.D., Marshall Mackay, Esq., Mr. Henry O'Neill, Mr. William Alcock, Mr. John Henderson, Mr. R. M'Aghon, Mr. John Kennedy, jun., Mr. R. M'Cherry [sic], Secretary, with power to add to their numbers.
Northern Whig, 21 September 1843.
Link to transcription.
Northern Whig, 5 December 1843 (donation of £100 by the Mercers' Company.)
Link to transcription.
1843-11-13
The Ballymoney PLU struck its second rate, totalling £1,180 19s. 8d.
Poor Law Commissioners' Report (1844),
pp. 518ff.
1843-01-01 to
1843-12-31
  The Magherafelt Union Workhouse commenced the year with 219 inmates, admitted 366 paupers during the year, discharged 397, with 268 inmates remaining at the end of the year.
  The Ballymoney Union Workhouse, which admitted its first paupers on the 6th March 1843, admitted 348 during the remainder of the year (including any that were born in the house), discharged 164 (including any deaths that occurred in the house), with 184 paupers remaining at the end of the year.
Poor Law Commissioners' Report (1844),
pp. 518ff.
1843-11-20 to
1845-02-14
A Commission was directed by her Majesty's Government, to "inquire into the state of the law and practice in respect to the occupation of land in Ireland, and in respect also to the burdens of county cess and other charges which fall respectively on the landlord and occupying tenant," &c. Creighton Hutchinson, who lived near Kilrea, was one of the many land occupiers who gave evidence.
Inquiry into the Law and Practice re Occupation of Land in Ireland (1845).
Link to transcriptions of evidence given by: Mr. Creighton Hutchinson, a farmer who lived near Kilrea; the Rev. John Brown, D.D., of Aughadowey, who expressed his candid opinions about the London Companies as landlords--also stating that, "A gentleman coming from London does not understand the patois of our northern people, who speak a kind of Scotch; and, on the other hand, they understand as little of his cockney English;" and, Rowley Miller, Esq., whose testimony addressed the Drapers' Company, but who was a prominent proponent of the Lower Bann Navigation project.
1844-01-10 to
1844-04-09
  At the end of the first quarter of 1844, on 9th April, 243 inmates were lodged in the Ballymoney Union Workhouse. During those three months, 118 persons had been admitted in varying states of bad health, primarily in the category of "bodily infirm." The population consisted of 147 people over the age of fifteen years, and 96 under; 100 males, and 143 females. Of the 96 children, 24 were identified as illegitimate, two of whom had been deserted by their mother. Of the other 72 children, 26 had been deserted by their mother or father, or both parents. Of the adults, more than 43% had been mendicants, the largest proportion being females, while many of the inmates with previous occupations had been male labourers or female servants.
  At the end of the first quarter of 1844, on 9th April, 309 inmates were lodged in the Magherafelt Union Workhouse. During those three months, 122 people had been admitted in varying states of bad health, primarily in the categories of "sickly or delicate," "idiot or imbecile," and "bodily infirm." The population consisted of 154 persons over the age of fifteen years, 155 under; 133 males, and 176 females. Of the 155 children, 29 had been identified as illegitimate, seven of whom had been deserted by their mother. Of the other 126 children, 39 had been deserted by their mother or father, or both parents. Of the adults, about one-third had been mendicants, primarily females,
while many of the inmates with previous occupations had been male labourers or female servants.
Poor Law Commissioners' Report (1844),
pp. 518ff. Link to extracts.

Note: The link, provided above, includes a selection of several cases from the returns of paupers from the Ballymoney and the Magherafelt PLUs, giving details of name, age, religious denomination, previous occupation, condition upon admission, and current condition. A detailed schedule of Appendixes from the Commissioner's Report is also provided, detailing the state of progress in the opening of the workhouses; collection of poor rates; accounts of expenditure upon the relief of the poor; statistics of admission, births, deaths, and discharge; summary of audited accounts and establishment charges; particulars of the paupers, including gender, religious persuasion, by what authority admitted, marital status of men and women, legitimacy of children, state of health at time of admission, and previous occupations.
1844
The Rev. William Denham resigned his charge at Boveedy.
Kernohan (1912), pg. 64.
1844
The Fair Trader day coach ran from Belfast to Londonderry daily, stopping at several towns en route, including Ballymoney (but not at Kilrea).
Coleraine Chronicle, 13 April 1844.
1844-01-01
Meeting of the inhabitants of the town and neighbourhood of Coleraine, relative to making the Lower Bann navigable. Mr. M'Cleery read a paper, describing the proposed Lower Bann Navigation, from Lough Neagh to Coleraine. The project would entail: dredging between Lough Neagh and Lough Beg; making a canal from above the fall at Portna to below the fall of Carnroe; making a cut and lock at Loughan Island; and, making another cut and canal to overcome the fall at Salmon Leap.
Northern Whig, 4 January 1844.
Link to transcription.
1844-01-04
Coleraine Quarter Sessions, in which applicants applied for licenses to keep arms.
Coleraine Chronicle, 24 August 1844.

See also entry under
1844-08-11, "A legal notice was published..."
1844-02-10
The parishioners of the United Parishes of Desertoghill and Kilrea presented an address and purse to the Rev. Daniel Mooney, C.C., on the occasion of his removal from Kilrea. The address was signed by John M'Kinney and Daniel Mooney, M.D., on behalf of the parishioners.
Vindicator, 10 February 1844.
Link to transcription.
The article includes Rev. Mr. Mooney's reply.
1844-04
Meetings were held in a number of towns, including Kilrea, "to consider the law relative to Presbyterian marriages. At most of these places[,] petitions to Parliament in favour of the right of the Presbyterian ministers to celebrate mixed marriages were adopted."
Dublin Weekly Register, 6 April 1844.
Link to transcription.
Belfast News-Letter, 4 June 1844 (petitions presented to Parliament). Link to transcription.
1844-04-20
The new parish church (Church of Ireland) at Kilrea was consecrated by his Grace the Lord Bishop of Derry and Raphoe. "This handsome building is situated at the end of Kilrea, near the Meeting-House, it is built with freestone, from a quarry in the vicinity of Buncranna, the style and workmanship is elegant; the large eastern window is of coloured plated glass, the smaller windows are neat, it adds much to the beauty of Kilrea." The building was "erected by the Mercers' Company, at a cost of about nine thousand pounds."
Coleraine Chronicle, 20 April 1844.
Statesman, 23 April 1844. Link to transcription.
1844-04-20
In consequence of ill health, W.H. Holmes, Esq., agent to the Mercers’ Company, would be giving up the situation, with a successor to be appointed in June.
Coleraine Chronicle, 20 April 1844.

See also entry under 1844-06-28, "Departure of William Henry Holmes, Esq...."
1844-04-25
Petitions were heard in Parliament from a large number of dissenting congregations in Ireland, praying for "the adoption of a measure to legalise marriages solemnised by a Presbyterian or dissenting minister, between members of the Established Church and Presbyterian Dissenters."
Coleraine Chronicle, 4 May 1844.
1844-05 to 1844-08
An engineer was engaged by the Board of Works to survey the river Bann from Lough Neagh to Coleraine, with a view to opening up that part of the river. The survey and the valuation were expected to be completed by August.
Coleraine Chronicle, 14 May 1844.
Coleraine Chronicle, 22 June 1844.
1844-05 to 1844-07-01
James Magee forced the slide off the letter-box at the post office in Kilrea, after the office had closed. He was prosecuted at the Petty Sessions in Kilrea on the 1st July. Mr. Becknell, the new agent for the Mercers' Company, intervened; and, an ample apology having been offered by Mr. Magee, the prosecution was withdrawn.
Coleraine Chronicle, 6 July 1844.
1844-05-06
The Ballymoney Poor Law Union submitted a memorial to Parliament, praying for the relief of the sum of £8,500, advanced by the Lords of the Treasury to the Union, to build the workhouse. While great numbers of people were relieved within the workhouse, "the travelling Mendicants still continue to demand charity as heretofore from the Rate Payers." The memorial was signed by Charles O'Hara, Chairman, on behalf of the Guardians.
Coleraine Chronicle, 18 May 1844.
1844-06
A larger number of trout was taken this season at Portna, than in any season during the previous twenty years.
Coleraine Chronicle, 22 June 1844.
1844-06-24
Arrival of George Becknell, the new agent of the Mercers' Company.
Coleraine Chronicle, 6 July 1844.
1844-06-25 & 26
Presentation of a large scale entertainment, called Hughes's "Grand Modern Roman Amphitheatre of Arts" at Ballymoney. The show featured a Music Carriage and orchestra, an elephant, twenty horses and Lilliputian ponies, and Mr. Brown, the Hibernian Clown--the show to be conducted within an immense Pavilion.
Coleraine Chronicle, 22 June 1844.
1844-06-28
Departure of William Henry Holmes, Esq., former agent of the Mercers' Company.
Coleraine Chronicle, 6 July 1844.
1844-07-20
A deputation of the Ulster Society for Promoting the Education of the Deaf and Dumb, and the Blind, attended at Kilrea, G. Bicknell, Esq., in the chair. "The Rev. Thomas Lindesay, the Rector of the parish, the Rev. Augustus Minchin, the Rev. H. Walker Rogers [sic], the Rev. M. Motherwell, the Rev. J. Dickey, &c., amongst others, were present. Collection, £4 02 4-1/2d."
Northern Whig, 27 July 1844.
Link to transcription.
1844-07-22
At the county of Londonderry Assizes, Samuel Pinkerton submitted to the charge of "rescuing at Kilrea, a horse, the property of William Doherty, which had been distrained for poor rate." Mr. Pinkerton was fined 1d. and discharged.
Belfast News-Letter, 30 July 1844.
Link to transcription.
1844-07-23
A man named Robert M'Callion, of Kilrea, and a boy named Matthew Kennedy, scaled the walls of the Ballymoney workhouse, bringing with them their workhouse clothes and part of the bedding. The men were apprehended, charged by Mr. R. Boyle, master of the Workhouse, with theft, &c., and brought before the magistrates on the 5th August. They confessed their guilt, and were ordered to find bail and to stand their trial at the Quarter Sessions.
Coleraine Chronicle, 27 July 1844, 10 Aug. 1844

The 10th August 1844 edition of The Belfast Protestant Journal said: "They were then committed to stand their trial at the next Quarter Sessions, otherwise to find bail, themselves £40 and two sureties in the sum of £20 each."
1844-08
Reports of "misses" in the potato crop in north Tyrone. Potatoes looking well in county Derry.
Coleraine Chronicle, 17 August 1844.
1844-08-09
(1) Act 7 & 8 Vic., cap. 81, Marriages (Ireland) Act, or an Act for Marriages in Ireland; and for registering such Marriages, was enacted by Parliament.
(2) Under this act, the Rev. H.W. Rodgers, of First Kilrea Presbyterian was appointed Licenser by the Magherafelt Presbytery.
(1) Cotton (1892), pg. 49.
(2) Coleraine Chronicle, 1844-09-14.
1844-08-11
A legal notice was published, requiring "all Persons residing in the Half-Barony of Coleraine, and connected with the Petty Sessions District of Kilrea," and who had been licensed to keep arms in the Coleraine Quarter Sessions of the 4th January 1844, to bring their Arms to the Constabulary Barracks at Garvagh, in order for those Arms to be marked.
Coleraine Chronicle, 24 August 1844.
1844-08-13
Meeting in the Court-room of Kilrea, to aid and support the Church Education Society, with the Rev. T. Lindsay in the chair. Collection, £9 4s. 7d.
Coleraine Chronicle, 17 August 1844.
1844-08
No less than 10,000 Irish shipped to Scotland to work in the harvest.
Coleraine Chronicle, 24 August 1844.
1844-09-12
The triennial visitation of the diocese of Derry (Church of Ireland) was held in the Cathedral, by his Grace the Lord Primate. "When the ordinary interrogatories respecting the parish of Tamlaghtocrilly had been answered by the Rev. Mr. Napper, the rector, his Grace the Lord Primate said he had received a memorial from the Rev. Mr. Bloxham, chaplain of a chapel of ease in that parish, in which it was stated that the writer was removed from the chaplaincy, because for twelve Sundays he was absent from his charge, although the duty was regularly performed. That, added his grace, addressing Mr. Bloxham, is a mistake; you have been suspended, but not removed. You are still the chaplain."
Statesman, 17 September 1844.
Link to transcription.
1844-09-20
Accident, at Kilrea: A lad, William Osborne, who had been residing with his grandfather, Mr. Walter M'Lucas, was thrown from a cart, the wheel of which passed over his head, causing instant death.
Coleraine Chronicle, 28 September 1844.
1844-09
The Mark Lane Express reported results of experiments by Messrs. Berry and Herring, in which the nutritive value of one hundred pounds of potatoes were found to be equal to that provided by 25lbs. of meat, or 28lbs. beans, or 35lbs. wheaten bread, or 190lbs. parsnips and carrots, or 300lbs. turnips, or 400lbs. cabbage. This result established "the fact that 3lbs. of potatoes are equal to twelve ounces of bread and five ounces of meat."
Coleraine Chronicle, 28 September 1844.
1844-10-01
It was reported that "the shares of the Belfast and Ballymena Railway were all taken with avidity according as they had been allocated." The editor of the Belfast Mercantile Register suggested "that the Committee of this undertaking may take measures in their present application to Parliament, to empower them to extend the Railway from Ballymena to Coleraine."
Belfast Mercantile Register, 1 October 1844.
Link to transcription.
1844-10-02
Visit to Ballymoney by Mr. Turner, Dentist, at Miss M'Ilronan's, Main-street. Mr. Turner supplied artificial mineral Teeth, stopped decayed and tender Teeth with fine gold, and cleaned Teeth.
Coleraine Chronicle, 28 September 1844.
1844-10-15
A sermon was preached by the Rev. Dr. Henry Cooke, to a crowded congregation, at 2nd Kilrea Presbyterian, for the purpose of liquidating the debt incurred by the congregation in erecting the meeting-house. The editor of the Coleraine Chronicle urged the Mercers' Company to "amend their past omission of duty to this congregation," and come forward with assistance for the congregation. The collection amounted to nearly £50.
Coleraine Chronicle, 5 Oct. 1844, 12 Oct. 1844, 26 Oct. 1844.
1844-10
"[T]he Worshipful Company of Mercers have, on recommendation of their excellent agent, G. Beckneil, Esq., remitted to the Archdeacon of Derry the munificent donation of fifty pounds, in aid of the funds now being raised in the diocese of Derry towards the endowment of the Church Education Society."
Coleraine Chronicle, 12 October 1844.
1844-10
The new Flax Market, built by the Mercers' Company, was opened.
Coleraine Chronicle, 19 October 1844.
1844-10-11
An editorial article in the Derry Standard criticized the Mercers' Company as "a wealthy and something Puseyitish corporation." For, while the Company had given £450 towards the decoration of a Roman Catholic chapel, they had not yet contributed anything towards the Second Presbyterian Church of Kilrea.
Statesman, 11 October 1844 (editorial).
Link to transcription.

Note: A public feud ensued between the editors of the Derry Standard and the Coleraine Chronicle, over language used by the former in reference to the new agent of the Mercers' Company, George Bicknell, Esq.
1844-10-17
Confirmation of children in the parish church (Church of Ireland) of Kilrea by the Lord Bishop of Derry.
Coleraine Chronicle, 19 October 1844.
1844-10-22
Meeting to inaugurate the new Kilrea Farming and Flax Improvement Society. Members were required to pay an annual subscription of 3s. 6p., and membership was required in order to compete for premiums (prizes) at any competitions hosted by the Society. The office holders were: George Bicknell, Esq., President; Alexander Clarke, Esq., and the Rev. Thomas Lindesay, Vice Presidents; Mr. R. M'Chlery, Secretary; Mr. John Henderson, Treasurer; and a committee of twenty-four men, including: the Revds. H.W. Rodgers, Robert Torrens, and Samuel Auterson; Dr. Clarke, M. M'Kay, William Adcock, Alexander Moore, Neal Collance, James Smith, W. Henderson, J. Kennedy, jun., Thomas Atkinson, James Dripps, John Bear, Thomas Gardner, C. Foy, H. O'Neill, Robert M'Kay, Arthur Church, C. Hutchinson, Alexander Gilmore, Robert M'Cahon, Adam Paul, and Patrick Heggarty.
Coleraine Chronicle, 2 November 1844.

Note: The annual subscription fee probably precluded small or poorer farmers from membership in the Society, and therefore, participating in competitions which awarded premiums.
1844-11
A new line of railway was under contemplation. As proposed, it would run from Portadown to Coleraine, passing through or as near as possible to many towns, including Maghera, Kilrea, Garvagh, &c. In petitions to Parliament, and in legal notices, the line would be called the Armagh, Coleraine, and Portrush Railway.
Coleraine Chronicle, 2 Nov. 1844, 21 Dec. 1844 (legal notice of provisional registration of the railway), and 28 Dec. 1844 (editorial).
1844-11
Clergymen of the diocese of Derry (Church of Ireland), including the Revds. Thomas Lindesay and Augustus Minchin of Kilrea, presented an address, declarative of their support of scriptural education in public schools.
Statesman, 26 November 1844.
Link to transcription.
1844-12-03
A new railway project was brought before the public, for a line "from Armagh to Portrush, via Charlemont, Stewartstown, Cookstown, Moneymore, Magherafelt, Maghera, Kilrea, Ballymoney, and Coleraine," provisionally registered as the Armagh, Coleraine and Portrush Railway. A meeting was held on the 14th December, "at which deputations representing two competing Lines hence to Armagh attended." The contending company was the Portadown, Armagh, Coleraine, and Portrush Railway. The meeting resolved that, though the meeting considered it "most important to the interests of the Counties of Antrim and Derry, that a line of Railway communication should be made from Armagh or Portadown, to the Seaport of Portrush; but they, at the same time, abstain from expressing any approbation or disapprobation, of any particular line." A subsequent meeting was scheduled for the 17th December 1844, in the Court-House, Ballymoney.
Dublin Monitor, 13 December 1844.
Link to transcription.
Coleraine Chronicle, 7 Dec. 1844, 14 Dec. 1844.
1844
In the year 1844, 10 ships carrying 2,107 emigrants left the port of Derry; 6 ships to Canada, carrying 905; and, 5 ships to St John, New Brunswick, carrying 815, for a total of 3,827 emigrants (an increase of 1,332 from 2,495 in 1843). In addition, 2,000 emigrants left Derry to proceed for the same destinations from Liverpool.
Coleraine Chronicle, 11 January 1845.

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References:
  • Cotton, James Sutherland, ed. The Practical Statutes of the Session 1892 (55 & 56 Victoria). London: Horace Cox, 1892.
  • Great Britain, House of Commons. Appendix, No. 31. "Paper handed in by Mr. Watney, 7 July 1890." Report from the Select Committee on Irish Society and London Companies (Irish Estates). London: Henry Hansard and Son, 1890.
  • Great Britain, House of Commons. Report from Her Majesty's Commissioners of Inquiry into the State of the Law and Practice in respect to the Occupation of Land in Ireland. Dublin: Alexander Thom, 1845.
  • Great Britain, House of Lords and House of Commons. The Census of Ireland for the year 1851. Part I. Vol. III. Province of Ulster. Dublin: Alexander Thom, 1852.
  • Great Britain, Poor Law Commission. Tenth Annual Report of the Poor Law Commissioners, with Appendices. London: W. Clowes and Sons, 1844.
  • Higginbotham, Peter. The Workhouse: The Story of an Institution. Online at www.workhouses.org.uk.
  • Kernohan, J.W. The Parishes of Kilrea and Tamlaght O'Crilly: A Sketch of Their History, With an Account of Boveedy Congregation. Coleraine: Chronicle Office, 1912. Transcribed by Barbara Braswell and Richard Torrens; posted to Richard Torrens' Bann Valley Genealogy web site, www.torrens.org.uk/Genealogy/Bann Valley/
  • Kilrea Local History Group. The Fairy Thorn: Gleanings and Glimpses of Old Kilrea; published by The Kilrea Local History Group. Coleraine: Impact Printing, 1984.
  • Kilrea Local History Group. The Fairy Thorn Revisited: More Gleanings and Glimpses of Old Kilrea, published by The Kilrea Local History Group. Coleraine, and Ballycastle, 1996.
  • Robinson, George V., ed. The Coleraine Chronicle. Coleraine, Ireland: 13th April 1844ff.
  • Sagart, Art. P. O'Raghallaigh. The Parish of Greenlough/Tamlaght O'Crilly: A Brief History (pub. 2006). Online at www.69thpa.co.uk/tamlaghtpdf.pdf (accessed 2015-01-17).
  • Tamlaght O'Crilly: Greenlough. "Our Parish History." http://www.greenlough.com/our-parish/our-parish-history/ (accessed 2015-01-25ff)
  • Wilson, James, ed. The Covenanter, Vol. IX (1853).
© Alison Kilpatrick 2015