Norton township, Summit County (1864-1897)

  We are indebted to the courtesy of Mr. Charles E. Wilson, Deputy Provost Marshal, for the following statement of the quota of each town and ward in this District, with the number credited to each of those places, which, being deducted, shows the number subject to the draft:

[Transcriber's note, that only the following was extracted from the article:]

Norton, Summit County...Quota--43. Credit—32. Def'cy—11.

Source: The Cleveland Daily Leader, "The Draft," 29 April 1864, pg. 4; online at www.newspapers.com (accessed 2015-04-23, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Please cite your sources.

  Official orders from the State Provost Marshal, Col. Potter, have been received by the Provost Marshal of this District, and it will begin on Saturday next, at nine o'clock. The place at which the grave ceremony will be conducted is the office of the Provost Marshal, F.A. Nash, No. 97 Bank Street. The township of Franklin, Summit County, will be drafted from first, and the draft will then proceed in regular order, beginning with Summit county then taking Lake, then taking the townships of Cuyahoga, and ending with the city of Cleveland. ...

Source: The Cleveland Daily Leader, "The Draft," 5 May 1864, pg. 4; online at www.newspapers.com (accessed 2015-04-23, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

  Morning Session.--—The Union Convention of the 18th Congressional District, held for the purpose of nominating two delegates to the National Union Convention which meets at Baltimore on the 7th of June, met at Brainard's Hall yesterday morning. The Summit county delegation were not present, owing to the non-arrival of the Pittsburgh train. ...Afternoon session.——At two p.m., the Convention was again called to order. The following delegates were present: [extracted only for:] Norton.——William Heustis, Charles Miller. ...

Source: The Cleveland Daily Leader, "Union Congressional Convention," 19 May 1864, pg. 4; online at www.newspapers.com (accessed 2015-04-23, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

  List of Drafted Men––Incidents of the Draft.
  The first supplementary draft, for the purpose of filling up the deficiency caused by exemptions, took place yesterday at the Provost Marshal's office, No. 97 Bank street. We say the first, for a second supplementary draft will be ordered to fill up the deficiencies which will occur by reason of exemptions among those drafted in the first. The total number to be drafted from this district was 404. The whole draft was completed yesterday, operations being greatly accelerated by dispensing with the formality of counting out the tickets from each township after it had been drafted. In other respects the process was the same as that so fully described at the time of the former draft. Beside the Board of Enrollment, the clerks, and the reporters of the city press, no one was present. No guard was deemed necessary and no excitement manifested. Only a small crowd collected outside the window of the Provost Marshal.
  The following is the complete list of persons drafted: [extracted only for:] Norton.——Eeficiency [sic]...4. JG Jones, Isaac Tristman [sic], Joseph Stuffer, Jacob H Baner. ...

Source: The Cleveland Daily Leader, "Supplementary Draft," 9 June 1864, pg. 4; online at www.newspapers.com (accessed 2015-04-23, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Proceedings in Saturday——The Draft Completed.
  The draft in this district was completed on last Saturday. Below is given the list of those elected in the lacking townships. The total force of drafted men in the district is 860. [Extracted only for:]
  Norton Township, Summit County.
  Quota, 13——To be drawn, 26.
Peter Hunsicker, John Lahr, Jr, David J Waltz, Charles P Snider, Gideon Krouse, Robert H Richards, George Rinner, Jr, Lanson L Merriam, Frederick Gafky, Edward Lanback, Edward Whitehead, David Miller, Martin J Whitesill, Nicholas Helsneck, Willoughby Fritz, Robert L Ferguson, Frederick Swain, David R Nassen, Phillip Miller, Jacob Waltz, William Beltz, Theodore Whitesell, William A George, A Lewis Mosler, Thomas Krum, Charles Young. ...

Source: The Cleveland Daily Leader, "The Draft," 26 September 1864, pg. 4; online at www.newspapers.com (accessed 2015-04-23, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

  A construction train on the A. & G.W.R.R., ran over a cow, in Norton township last Monday morning. A portion of the train was thrown down an embankment, killing Mr. J.B. Jones, of Norton, and an Irishman, and severely injuring four or five other workmen on the road.

Source: The Cleveland Daily Leader, "Neighborhood News--Summit County," 15 November 1864, pg. 4; online at www.newspapers.com (accessed 2015-04-22, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

A New Apportionment of Quotas.
  The apportionment of the quotas of the sub-districts of the 18th Congressional District, it is stated by the Provost Marshal officials, has been found full of errors and a new apportionment has been made accordingly, on the basis of the enrolment as it stood December 31st.
  The following, it is announced, is the correct and final appointment [sic], on the basis of which the coming draft will be made whenever it shal be ordered.
  We give below the respective quotas and credits of the various townships and city wards in this Districts [sic]"

[Transcriber's note, that only the following was extracted from the article:]

Norton...Quota, 13. Credit, --.

Source: The Cleveland Daily Leader, "The Coming Draft," 17 February 1865, pg. 4; online at www.newspapers.com (accessed 2015-04-23, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

  Matters at the Provost Marshal's Office.——Recruiting in this District is very dull now, indeed it is ominously dull, for all sub-districts which are far behind in making up their quotas, and especially those which are doing nothing at all to escape, are threatened by the authorities with the visitation, any day, of the impending draft. Yesterday there were but seventeen men, all told, reported examined by the Examining Surgeon. ... The following sub-districts did not muster a man: In Summit county, Norton, Richfield, and Stow; ...

Source: The Cleveland Daily Leader, "The Impending Draft," 3 March 1865, pg. 4; online at www.newspapers.com (accessed 2015-04-23, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

  Yesterday was a lively day at the Provost Marshal's office, and the result is calculated to inspire the hope that the District will clear itself from the draft if a few more days of grace are allowed, as well as the belief that the sub-districts will now rush the work of recruiting right through to a conclusion.
  The Surgeon yesterday examined thirty-four men, of whom twenty-seven passed.——Of this number twenty-three were mustered, and stand credited as follows: [extracted only for:] Norton, Summit county, 8. ...

Source: The Cleveland Daily Leader, "Recruiting" 29 March 1865, pg. 4; online at www.newspapers.com (accessed 2015-04-23, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

  A new post-office, called Dennison, has been established at the Great Western Coal Bank, in the township of Norton, upon the line of the A. G. W. Railway, half way between New Portage and Wadsworth.

Source: The Cleveland Daily Leader, "The new post-office at Dennison" 24 March 1866, pg. 2; online at www.newspapers.com (accessed 2015-04-23, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

From the Akron Beacon:
  The storm of Sunday and Monday caused the death of a number of newly shorn sheep. In the township of Copley, we learn that Mr. John Wylie lost twelve or fifteen head, a Mr. Bower 30 or 40 head, Mr. Parker 10, Mr. Bell 23, Mrs. Starr 18, Mr. Arnold 11, Mr, Bosworth 7——Mr.Solomon Koplin, of Wadsworth, 63, John Bennabe, of Bath, 80, Elias Miller 40. In fact, almost every sheep grower in this region of the country has suffered more or less, the number lost in this county alone, reaching, undoubtedly, many thousands.

Source: The Cleveland Daily Leader, "Storm caused death of sheep," 23 June 1866, pg. 2; online at www.newspapers.com (accessed 2015-04-23, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Wadsworth, Ohio.
  Akron, March 1.——A. Myers, a respected farmer of Norton township, Summit County, was run over and instantly killed this morning. He was starting west from Wadsworth Station, and hearing the conductor cry, "All aboard," crossed the track to get to the westward-bound train, which was run into by the eastward-bound train, which was just arriving. The engine and two cars passed over and terribly mangled him, cutting open his bowels, and his head off, which was under the cars and his legs hanging over the rail. The body was taken to his residence.

Source: The Cincinnati Enquirer, "A. Myers killed by a train," 2 March 1878, pg. 1; online at www.newspapers.com (accessed 2015-04-23, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Disastrous Visitation.––Summit County Swept by a Cyclone, Entailing Heavy Loss ...
  Special Dispatch to the Enquirer.
  Akron, Ohio, August 1.——A terrific cyclone swept through Norton Township, six miles west of this city, last night. Many acres of corn and oats and much fruit were uprooted and hundreds of forest trees were felled to the ground, being torn up by the roots. The storm came from a northerly direction and passed entirely through the township to the extreme southwest corner, taking in a strip fully a half mile wide.
  On the farms owned by Daniel Rigel, George Reimer, Daniel Miller, Usias Miller, Samuel Reimer, Daniel Harrier, Mrs. Martin Hinsicker, Jacob Boerstler, Daniel Weaver, Joseph Hartzel, Simon Hoch and Philip Shellhart much damage was done to the crops and trees. Miles of fences were carried away by the storm and scattered over the fields. Oats in shocks were torn open and carried like loose straw before the wind. In many places an unprecedented hail-storm accompanied the cyclone, doing great damage. Corn-fields were entirely stripped, nothing but the bare stalks remaining. In the village of Loyal Oak several trees were blown down upon houses, and numerous chimneys crashed upon the house-tops. The scene was a terrific one. People wildly sought shelter, and cattle bellowed loudly as the hail-stones beat upon them. The scene to-day is a discouraging one, but the natives of the storm-beaten district are thankful that their lives were spared them, as many feared last night such would not be the case. The damage can not now be estimated, but will be many thousands of dollars.

Source: The Cincinnati Enquirer, "Township swept by cyclone," 2 August 1884, pg. 1; online at www.newspapers.com (accessed 2015-04-23, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

  Thirteen cattle have died from pleuro-pneumonia on a farm in Norton township, Summit county, Ohio.

Source: The Ohio Democrat, "Cattle die of pneumonia," 25 September 1886, pg. 4; online at www.newspapers.com (accessed 2015-04-23, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Lightning's Freaks
Played in and About Akron During a Storm. ...
Special Dispatch to the Enquirer.
  Akron, Ohio. June 18.——Reports from the surrounding country show that last night's storm was one of the most severe ever experienced in this section. [Description done to persons and property, including:]
  At Hametown the barn of Mrs. John Baker was struck and burned with its contents. Loss about $1,300; partially insured.
  At Sherman the barn of Nicholas Baker was destroyed by lightning and fire. Loss $300.
  At Wadsworth the residence of George Libert was struck and several persons were shocked. The roof was shattered and the ceilings damaged.
  At Johnson's Crossings the large bank barn of Frederick Wunderlick was burned, together with an adjoining cider mill. ...

Source: The Cincinnati Enquirer, "Lightning's freaks," 19 June 1890, pg. 1; online at www.newspapers.com (accessed 2015-04-24, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

  The post office at Norton, Summit County, has been discontinued.

Source: The News-Herald, (Hillsboro, Ohio), "Post office discontinued," 19 November 1896, pg. 3; online at www.newspapers.com (accessed 2015-04-23, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

  Akron, Aug. 17.——A gentleman living near Barberton states that there are many families in Norton township, absolutely suffering for food. He says that things have reached such a pass that some farmers have difficulty in protecting their crops. Several cases are reported where men out of work entered potato fields to fill sacks with potatoes. When ordered out they refused to go, saying they had no work and must get food of some kind if they were obliged to steal it.

Source: The Democratic Standard (Coshocton, Ohio), "Terrible destitution," 25 August 1893, pg. 4; online at www.newspapers.com (accessed 2015-04-23, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

  Massillon, O., Aug. 1.——The inquest held to determine the cause of Edward Borden's death near Hametown, developed the fact that Borden boasted on his ability to fire a shot in the mines with a shorter fuse than any of his fellow-workmen. He was continually endeavoring to lower his record. The last one he used extended only two inches from the hole containing the charge, and the explosion resulted in his death.

Source: The Hamilton Daily Republican (Hamilton, Ohio), "Foolhardy act of a miner," 1 August 1894, pg. 1; online at www.newspapers.com (accessed 2015-04-23, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

  An Akron faith cure "doctor" has sued a farmer in Norton township, Summit county, for a $25 fee for attending his wife. The "doctor" alleges that a cure would have resulted from his professional attentions had the woman's faith been strong. Should this "doctor" win the case the court's decision will be interesting.

Source: The Salem Daily News (Salem, Ohio), "Faith cure doctor sues farmer," 16 June 1896, pg. 4; online at www.newspapers.com (accessed 2015-04-23, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

The Long-Eared Chaps Destroying Orchards in Summit County.
  Akron, March 4.——In the southern part of Summit county rabbits are doing much damage to fruit trees and shrubbery. Samuel Kepler of Norton says that two young orchards he owns have been injured to the extent of several hundred dollars, many trees being completely girdled.

Source: The Salem Daily News (Salem, Ohio), "Rabbits damaged fruit trees," 4 March 1897, pg. 2; online at www.newspapers.com (accessed 2015-04-23, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Please cite your sources.

"The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there."—Lesley Poles Hartley (1895–1972), The Go-Between (1953).

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