Flavell, Gilmore, & Jones, of the parish of Drumcree

This page contains items of local history, as well as family history, interest. The project of collecting and transcribing articles  is a work in progress.

Notes:

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To the Rev. Stewart Blacker,
Rector of the Parish of Drumcree,
in the county of Armagh.
   Sir——We, the Undersigned, being the Principal Land-occupiers of the Parish of Drumcree, having seen the Address of the late Grand Jury of this County, to our Representatives in Parliament, complaining of the severe manner in which Tithes are collected in certain Parishes in this County——an Address which, not having pointed any particular Parish, must leave an impression to the disadvantage of the whole Body of the Beneficed Clergy of the County, on the minds of all who do not know them——We, therefore, feel ourselves called on, th[-] publicly to declare, that, in this Parish, no reason whatever for such an Address exists; that your conduct, at all times to us has been friendly, kind, and humane; and we sincerely wish you every happiness in the enjoyment of the moderate Tithes you receive from us.

[Signatories; surnames sorted alphabetically:]

  • Robert Abraham
  • Edward, Miles, Robert, Stevenson, and William Atkinson
  • John Branken
  • John and William Brownlee
  • James Byers
  • Draper Chapman
  • John Conn
  • Thomas Cooke
  • John Corry
  • Arthur Creggan
  • John Coulter
  • Henry Courtney
  • John Crocket
  • Patrick Cromie
  • Philex Crommey
  • Joseph Delap
  • Roger and William Devlin
  • George and Thomas Dickson
  • Hugh Dougan
  • Patrick Ferin
  • James, George, Thomas, and William Flavil
  • William Gibson
  • Robert Gilmor
  • John and Dan. Gribban
  • Charles, Foster, and Henry Jackson
  • John, Thomas, and Robert Jones
  • James and John Joyce
  • Joseph, Joseph, jun., and John Lappin
  • Thomas Leckey
  • John Lutton
  • William M'Alister
  • Edward, Giles, and John M’Cann
  • Dennis M’Cormick
  • John M'Creery
  • Thomas M’Gowan
  • William M’Grandle
  • John M'Kittrick
  • Robert M’Leland
  • John M’Manus
  • John M'Quilon
  • John M’Veagh
  • William Magee
  • Benjamin Mallagh
  • William Matchet
  • Andrew, Patrick, and Roger Marley
  • William Mawhinney
  • William May
  • Jo. Midkiff
  • Hyrick Moneypenny
  • John Morrison
  • George and William Morrow
  • Richard Mullan
  • Patrick Murphy
  • John Orr
  • Moses Paul
  • John Posnet
  • John Proctor
  • William Robb
  • David and James Robinson
  • Henry R[-]pley
  • Thomas Shillington
  • Benjamin Sinnamon
  • George Somerville
  • Henry Thormon
  • Henry Walker
  • John Watson (X2)
  • James, John, and William Weir
  • Michael Weldon
  • Stewart Wetherall
  • Curran and George Woodhouse
  • Benjamin and John Woolsey
  • James, John, Wm., and William Wright
  • Robert Yeomans

SourceBelfast Commercial Chronicle, 18 June 1808 (pg. 2). “To the Rev. Stewart Blacker,” petitioners of the parish of Drumcree. Digital image online at The British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2017-07-08, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Portadown Petty Sessions——Monday.
(Before Wm. Moore Miller, Esq., R.M.,
and Thos. A. Shillington, Esq., J.P.)
   Charge of Assault and Highway Robbery.
Edward Jones, Derrymacfall, summoned Patrick Cummerton, of Derryanvil, for assaulting him and robbing him of the sum of £8 on the public road at Derryanvill, on the morning of Sunday, the 26th of November last.
   Mr. Dickson, of Portadown, with Mr. Rea, of Belfast, appeared for the prosecution, and Mr. Carleton, of Portadown, for the defendant.
   This case was before the Court on the 27th of November last, when the magistrate dismissed it “without prejudice.”
   From the evidence of the complainant, which was nearly the same as that given by him on the previous court-day, it appeared that he left Portadown on the night of Saturday, the 25th of November, about twelve o’clock, having in his possession the sum of £8 in bank-notes; that when he got about a mile out of town he was overtaken by the defendant, whom he knew quite well, and after they had walked together for some time, the defendant began to jostle him, and some short time after that he, the said defendant, drew his fist and knocked down complainant, and then put his hand into his (complainant’s) pocket and took from him a purse containing the sum in question; that, after doing so, he (the defendant) whistled, when four men came up, who beat him (complainant) with sticks until he was nearly killed; that afterwards he got on as well as he could until he arrived at the house of one
Wm. Jones, where he got in at about two o’clock on Sunday morning, and had to remain there until Sunday evening before he was able to go home, from the effects of the injuries he had received; that on Monday morning, the 27th November, he found his purse, with the whole of his money, inside of his own door, just as a man named John Power, who had called to inquire how he (complainant) then was, passed out.
   Head-Constable Robert Bailey proved that he arrested the defendant in his own house on Sunday evening, on the 26th November, and found him with the sum of £8 2s, in notes and silver, which he retained until after the court on next day, and had same in his possession at the time the complainant alleged he found his own money.
   John Power, on being sworn, stated that the money was not found while he was in the house of complainant, but that, after he had left the house some time, the complainant’s son followed him, and told him to come back, for that they had found the money; and on going back he got complainant sitting in the same chair at the fire where he had left him when he went out, and who informed him that the money had been found just inside of the door.
   Their Worships, after consulting for some time, stated that they did not think the evidence was such as would warrant them in sending the case before a jury.
   Mr. Rea contended that if any doubt existed as to the robbery there could be no doubt as to the violent assault which, he said, had been committed on his client.
   It was then, by consent of the plaintiff and defendant, through their respective attorneys, agreed that the case of assault should be disposed of in a summary manner by the Bench; and, after some further consultation, the Bench declared that they could not think of convicting the defendant upon the evidence given, and dismissed the case.
   Mr. Rea then submitted that same should be dismissed without prejudice, but their worships refused to do so.
   Upon the Bench announcing their decision, there was a general uproar and cheer, whereupon Mr. Miller directed the police to take into custody any person who in any way further disturbed the Court.——Correspondent.
SourceBelfast News-Letter, 14 December 1865 (pg. 4). “Portadown Petty Sessions,” re: Jones of Derrymacfall, Cummerton and Jones of Derryanville. Digital image online at The British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2017-07-08, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Lurgan Quarter Sessions.
(From our own reporter.)
Lurgan, Monday.
   This morning at ten o’clock, Hans Hamilton, Esq., Q.C., Chairman of the County Armagh, took his seat in the Court House, Lurgan, and commenced the business of the Quarter Sessions of the Peace for this division of the county. The magistrates present were——Lord Lurgan, John W. Greer, Esq.; Francis Watson, Esq.; J.J. O’Brien, Esq.; and Wm. M. Miller, Esq., R.M. …
   Alleged Forcible Possession.
Wm. Matchett was indicted for having, on the 1st of April last, forcibly expelled John Devlin and Patrick Connor from the possessio of a piece of bog in the townland of Derryanvil. He was also charged with assaulting a young man named Thos. Finnegan.
   Mr. M’Kinstry, Sessional Crown Solicitor, appeared, with Mr. Morris, for the prosecution, and Mr. Carleton appeared on behalf of the traverser.
   The jury, after hearing the evidence in the case, acquitted the accused. … 
SourceBelfast News-Letter, 26 June 1866 (pg. 3). “Lurgan Quarter Sessions,” re: Matchett, Devlin, Connor, and Finnegan, in Derryanvil. Digital image online at The British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2017-07-08, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Portadown Petty Session——Monday.
(Before Thos. A. Shillington, Esq., J.P.,
and Thos. Armstrong, Esq., J.P.)
… Selling Spirits Without Licence.
   Sub-Constable Ferguson summoned Anne M’Managill, of Derryanvill, for selling spirits on the 6th, 15th, and 23rd of July last, without being duly licensed to sell same.
   Mr. Carleton appeared for the prosecution, and Mr. Dickson for the defendant.
   Several witnesses were examined, who proved the sale of spirits on the 6th and 15th July.
   The defendant was convicted of having sold spirits on said days without a licence, and fined 10s and 7s costs for each offence. The charge of selling on the 23rd was dismissed.——
Correspondent.
SourceBelfast Weekly News, 17 August 1867 (pg. 5). “Portadown Petty Sessions,” re: Anne M’Managill of Derryanvill. Digital image online at The British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2017-07-08, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

   Primitive Methodist Sunday Schools.——The annual festival of the Primitive Wesleyan Methodist Sabbath schools in the Portadown circuit came off on Thursday, the 17th instant. The Ballinary, Derryall, Scotch Street, and Derryanville schools, headed by their superintendents and teachers, and accompanied by some of their friends, assembled at Derryall, from whence they marched to Derryanville, where refreshments were abundantly provided, principally under the supervision of Mr. R. Robinson, who, with his excellent family, took a prominent part in all the arrangements. The processionists numbered about 700, and they sang with much spirit some appropriate hymns; while banners bearing encouraging and instructive mottoes added considerably to their appearance. After refreshments, the company retired to an adjoining field, kindly placed at their disposal by John Sinnamon, Esq., where they enjoyed themselves for nearly two hours in a variety of ways, after which they returned to the meeting-house, where a meeting was held, presided over by the Rev. James Derby. Addresses were delivered by Messrs. Henry Kingsborough, Robert Robinson, Joseph Smith, Moses Wilson [or Wilton], superintendents; Robert Montgomery, Wesleyan; and by William M’Cabe, who took occasion to return thanks to all deserving parties, not forgetting Messrs. Thomas and Charles Montgomery, who contributed very much to the day’s enjoyment.——Correspondent.
SourceBelfast News-Letter, 19 August 1876 (pg. 3). “Primitive Methodist Sunday Schools,” assembly at Derryanville. Digital image online at The British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2017-07-08, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

   Portadown Petty Sessions.——These sessions were held yesterday before Captain Whelan, R.M.; Major Blacker, D.L., J.P.; and Thos. Shillington, Esq., J.P. … William Holland appeared on his own recognizance to answer the charge of John Montgomery for stealing 10s out of a drawer in the shop of complainant, at Derryanvill, on the 10th inst. The defendant, being a young lad, their Worships dealth with him as juvenile offender, and fined him 10s, with 6s 6d costs, or fourteen days’ imprisonment. …
SourceBelfast News-Letter, 25 December 1877 (pg. 3). “Portadown Petty Sessions,” re: Holland and Montgomery at Derryanvill. Digital image online at The British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2017-07-08, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

   Methodist Society.——The annual tea-meeting in connection with the above society was held in Derryanville Methodist Chapel, on Thursday, the 26th December last. The attendance was large and respectable, notwithstanding the inclemency of the evening. The chair was occupied by the Rev. R. Johnston, Portadown. Addresses were delivered by the Rev. H. M’Gahis[?], Portadown, and Rev. George Robinson, Lurgan. The addresses were most interesting, and well calculated to instruct and improve the minds of those present. On the whole the meeting was successful, and spoke well for the present and future of Methodism in that locality. The tables (twelve in number) were supplied gratis by the friends in Derryanville and vicinity. Votes of thanks having been accorded to the ladies who presided at the tea tables, the speakers, and the stewards, singing and prayer brought the proceedings to a close.——Cor. SourceUlster Gazette, 4 January 1879 (pg. 3). “Methodist Society,” annual tea-meeting at Derryanville. Digital image online at The British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2017-07-08, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

   Portadown Presentment Sessions.——The half-yearly Presentment Sessions were held yesterday in the Court-house, before J. Atkinson, Esq., J.P. (in the chair); Capt. O’Brien, J.P.; T.H. White, Esq., J.P.; and the following [—]ated cesspayers:——Messrs. W.J. Paul, James Best, John Hall, David M’Clelland, James Dunlop, George Hayes, James Davidson, John G. Winder, Esq., J.P., secretary to the Grand Jury, and Henry Davidson, Esq., county Surveyor, were also present. … Mr. Robert M’Clatchy (clerk in Town Commissioners) … applied for … cutting down bog road from Derryanvil to Kilmagamish, at a cost of £50, granted. …
SourceBelfast Morning News, 16 May 1879 (pg. 3). “Portadown Presentment Sessions,” bog road from Derryanvil to Kilmagamish. Digital image online at The British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2017-07-08, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

An Orangeman murdered in Ireland.
   The dead body of a man named William Boyd, a prominent Orangeman, was found in a bog-hole yesterday morning on the townland of Derryanville, near Portadown. The body bore several marks of violence. The deceased is said to have been obnoxious to the Roman Catholics of the neighbourhood.
SourceSt. James’s Gazette, 1 January 1884 (pg. 13). “An Orangeman murdered in Ireland,” (William Boyd, at Derryanville). Digital image online at The British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2017-07-08, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

County of Armagh.
Public Works.
   Proposals for the execution of the following will be received at the Office of the Secretary of the Grand Jury Courthouse, Armagh, until 4 o’clock, p.m., on Saturday, 5th day of March, 1892.
   Plans and Specifications may be seen at and Forms of Tender procured from my Office, Courthouse, Armagh.
   The Contractors and their Sureties must attend the Grand Jury, Armagh, on Monday, 7th March, 1892, at 11.30 o’clock, a.m.
   Barony of O’Neiland West.
… No. 88.——To build 336 perches of fences, road from Portadown to Stewartstown, between John Devlin’s land in Ballymagone, and John Sinnamon’s in Derryanville. Not to exceed 3s per perch for the work. …
Joseph Atkinson, jun., Secretary.
Secretary’s Office, Courthouse,
Armagh, 17th Feb., 1892.
SourceUlster Gazette, 27 February 1892. “County Armagh. Public Works,” re: Derryanville. Digital image online at The British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2017-07-08, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Parliament.
(By special wire and ordinary telegraph.)
House of Commons—— Yesterday.
… Postal Facilities in Portadown, &c.
   Mr. Barton asked the Postmaster-General whether a petition has been received by him from the merchants of Portadown and inhabitants of the townlands of Ballinagore, Derryanville, Derrycorey, Derrycarn, and Derrymacfal, near Portadown, asking for a rural post delivery to these townlands; whether the prayer of the petition has been inquired into, and reported on, by the inspector; whether the result of such inquiry and report is favourable to the prayer of the petitioners; and whether, in view of the present serious inconvenience to persons residing in his locality, a rural postal delivery will granted for the district.
   Sir James Fergusson——Such a memorial has been received. The arrangement desired by the memorialists appears to be convenient, and I hope that it may be found practicable to adopt it.
SourceFreeman’s Journal, 13 April 1892. “Postal Facilities in Portadown, &c.,” including the rural townlands. Digital image online at The British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2017-07-08, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Statutory Notice to Creditors.
   In the Goods of Benjamin Jones, late of Derryanville, in the County of Armagh, Farmer, Deceased.
   Notice is hereby given, pursuant to the Statute 22nd and 23rd Vic. Cap. 35, that all Persons claiming to be Creditors, or otherwise to have any Claims or Demands against the Assets of the above-named Deceased, who died on the 10th of February, 1898, are hereby required on or before the 30th day of June, 1898, to furnish (in writing) the particulars of such Claims or Demands to the undersigned Solicitor for William John Locke, J.P., of Portadown, in the County of Armagh, and William Stedmond, of Derryanville, in the County of Armagh, the Executors named in the Will of the said Deceased, to whom Probate was granted on the 21st day of March, 1898, forth of the Armagh District Registry of the Queen’s Bench Division (Probate), of the High Court of Justice in Ireland. And notice is hereby also given that after that date the said Executors will proceed to distribute the Assets of the said Deceased amongst the parties entitled thereto, having regard only to the Claims of which the said Executors shall then have had notice.
Dated this 5th day of May, 1898.
William H. Wright, Solicitor
for said Executors, Portadown.

Notice of Charitable Bequest.
   In the Goods of Benjamin Jones, late of Derryanville, in the County of Armagh, Farmer, Deceased.
   Notice is hereby given, pursuant to the Statute 30 and 31 Victoria, Chapter 54, section 19, that the above Deceased, by his will dated the 9th day of February, 1898, bequeathed unto his Executors his Farm, Chattels, Furniture, and everything of which he was possessed, to be sold by them, and after payment of his debts and certain pecuniary Legacies therein mentioned, the balance to be given to the Select Vestry of the Drumcree Parish (for the time being), to be used for Church purposes. And Probate of said Will was, on the 21st day of March, 1898, granted to William John Locke, J.P., of Portadown, and William Stedmond, of Derryanville, the two Executors named in said Will, forth of the District Registry, at Armagh, of the Queen’s Bench Division (Probate), of the High Court of Justice in Ireland.
Dated this 5th day of May, 1898.
William H. Wright, Solicitor, for said Executors,
17 D’Olier Street, Dublin; and Portadown.
To the Commissioners of Charitable
Donations and Bequests, and all
others concerned.
SourceBelfast News-Letter, 11 May 1898. “Statutory Notice to Creditors,” and “Notice of Charitable Bequest,” re: Benjamin Jones of Derryanville, co. Armagh, deceased. Digital image online at The British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2017-07-08, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Fatal Revolver Accident Near Portadown.
   Mr. Coroner Atkinson held an inquest at Derryanville, near Portadown, on the 18th inst., on the body of Samuel George Johnston, who died from the effects of injuries inflicted by a revolver shot. Mary Jane Johnston deposed that the deceased was her husband, and was about 43. He was a labourer and weaver. About 11.30 o’clock on the previous day she heard a revolver shot, and on going into the room where her husband was[,] found him leaning against the bed with his head towards the pillow. She did not know whether the revolver was loaded or not, as he kept it in his possession. Deceased told her to hold his head, and then called for a drink. She asked him what he did it for, but he made no answer. She had noticed the deceased strange lately. A few days previously he was going to Portadown to tell the police about the parties that were gathering. There were no persons gathering; he only imagined it. Dr. Dougan, J.P., said he found deceased lying on the bed suffering from a punctured wound at the lower end of his breast bone. He was suffering considerable pain, but was able to speak, and seemed sensible. Witness asked him how it occurred, and he said he was trying to take the cartridge out of the revolver when it went off. Witness dressed the wound, and bandaged him, and he believed he died a few hours afterwards. He made a post-mortem examination, and found that the punctured wound was caused by a revolver bullet, which he produced. The revolver was lying beside deceased in the bed, and was loaded in all the chambers but one. The jury found that death was due to shock, the result of the injuries sustained by a revolver shot wound, but how the wound was inflicted there was not sufficient evidence to show.
SourceNorthern Whig, 23 February 1905 (pg. 12). “Fatal revolver accident near Portadown,” re: Samuel George Johnston of Derryanville. Digital image online at The British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2017-07-08, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

1915-01-16-larne-times-private-w-hanvey


Private W. Hanvey, 1st Royal Irish Fusiliers, son of Mr. W.J. Hanvey, Derryanvill, Portadown, killed in action on November 8.

Source: Larne Times, 16 January 1915 (pg. 3). Death of Private W. Hanvey of Derryanville. Digital image online at The British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2017-07-08, by subscription).


Grave Registration Document (pg. 33):
   HANVEY, Pte. William, 11158. 1st Bn. Royal Irish Fusiliers. 8th Nov., 1914. Age 21. Son of William John and Sarah Hanvey, or Derryanville, Portadown. II. I. 32.
Source: Commonwealth War Graves Commission, online at cwgc.org (accessed 2017-07-08).

   Temperance Work in Portadown.——A well attended meeting in furtherance of local option was held in Thomas Street Methodist Hall, Portadown, on Wednesday last, Rev. Herbert Deale presiding. An interesting programme of recitations, solos, &c., was rendered by Rev. H. and Mrs. Deale, the Misses M’Farland, A. Turkington, and Hughes and Mr. Lisk. The special speaker was Mr. E.A. Atkinson, of the Irish Temperance League, who had already addressed meetings on the previous days in Mahon and Derryanville. The chairman, in concluding the meeting, referred appreciatively to the work of the Irish Temperance League.
SourceBelfast News-Letter, 4 March 1922 (pg. 8). “Temperance Work in Portadown." Digital image online at The British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2017-07-08, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Bann Drainage Plan.
Government Representatives Inspect Flooded Areas.
   The Rt. Hon. H.M. Pollock, Minister of Finance; Mr. J.C. Davison, K.C., M.P.; Major D.G. Shillington, D.L., M.P.; Colonel Spender, and Mr. J. Trueman (Ministry of Finance Office), along with Messrs. David Rock, M.B.E., J.P. (chairman of Portadown Urban Council); J. Kerr, U.D.C.; P.J. Sheil, J.P.; W. Hewitt, J.P.; Rev. F.J. Halahan, M.A., M.C., rector of Drumcree, and Mr. H. Sewell, Town Clerk, visited the flooded area near Portadown, which includes the townlands of Derryneskin, Derryanville, Derrymacfall, Derrycarne, and Derryall.
   At Derryall a meeting of the local residents was held in the Church Hall, and addresses were given by Mr. Pollock and Major Shillington, both of whom expressed sympathy with the people in their plight and assured them that the Government intended to proceed with a scheme to drain the River Bann, consideration of which had reached an advanced stage. But the Government wished to be certain that the work they would carry out would achieve all that was claimed for it, and would not fail like the M’Mahon scheme carried out by the Imperial Government.
   The meeting expressed satisfaction with the assurance given by the Minister, and with the attitude of the Government, and on the motion of Rev. F.J. Halahan, seconded by Mr. Rock, a vote of thanks was unanimously accorded to Mr. Pollock, Mr. Davidson, and Major Shillington.
   The townland of Muckery, which juts out into Lough Neagh near Maghery, and is on a higher level that the surrounding lands[,] is completely isolated.
SourceBelfast News-Letter, 16 February 1928 (pg. 13). “Bann Drainage Plan,” re: flooding of rural townlands in the parish of Drumcree. Digital image online at The British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2017-07-06, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Portadown Harrier Club.
   This club had a very exciting paper chase on Saturday evening. As the recent inclement weather made the choice of a route rather difficult, N. Brady and A. Grimason, who laid the trail, were given a good few minutes’ start before the pack started out. J. Redmond set the pace, and owing to the chilly breeze a little more speed than usual was displayed, especially in the first part of the race. The course led cross-country to Derryanville, Derrycarne, Kilmagamish, and Drumcree. The race proved very enjoyable. The members are showing much better form than a few weeks ago.
SourceNorthern Whig, 20 November 1928. “Portadown Harrier Club.” Digital image online at The British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2017-07-06, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Orange Funeral at Portadown.
   About 100 Orangemen, headed by Brs. F. Forsythe, W.M. and T. Carrick, D.M., of Kilmagamish L.O.L. No. 20, and accompanied by Br. David Rock, M.B.E., J.P., D.G.M.I., attended the funeral to Drumcree yesterday of Br. Robert John Ruddell, who succumbed to injuries received when a horse which he attempted to catch kicked him.
   The Rev. F.J. Halahan, M.A., rector of Drumcree officiated.
   The chief mourners were——Messrs. Ralph and Moses Ruddell (brothers), William and Thomas Jones (uncles), Thomas, William, Robert and Benjamin Jones (cousins).
Source: Belfast News-Letter, 23 November 1934. “Orange Funeral at Portadown.” Digital image online at The British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2017-07-06, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

Methodism in Portadown.
Derryanville Church Reopened.
   Derryanville Methodist Church, Portadown, one of the oldest Methodist churches in Ireland——it was built in 1784——was re-opened yesterday for divine service after extensive renovations.
   In 1769 John Wesley paid one of his six visits to the district, the last being on 15th June, 1785, when he was in his 83rd year.
   The portion of the building now used for worship formed the original church, and the original entrance door, still in use, is in a[n] excellent state of preservation.
   At the morning service yesterday the preacher was the Rev. J.B. Jameson, Portadown, who took as his subject “The past, present, and future.” He said that while times at present were difficult they should not tremble with the fear of Mussolini or Hitler, who were only as grasshoppers in the sight of Almighty God.
   Miss E. Sullivan was at the organ, and the soloist was Mr. N.A. Lyttle, Portadown.
   At the evening service the preacher was Rev. G.A. M’Ilwrath, superintendent of the Portadown circuit. Mr. S. M’Kinley, Portadown, sang. Offerings were in aid of renovation funds.
   A pulpit hymn book, presented by Mrs. Nicholson and family, in memory of her husband (Mr. Thomas Nicholson) and family was dedicated at the morning service, when the new Methodist hymnal was introduced to the congregation for the first time.
SourceBelfast News-Letter, 5 September 1938 (pg. 11). “Methodism in Portadown." Digital image online at The British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2017-07-08, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

   Derdyanvil [sic] Church (Portadown circuit) celebrated its one hundred and sixty-first anniversary last week-end. Mr. Norman Robb presided over the thanksgiving meeting which followed the Sunday services. Mr. Robb’s family were foundation members of the church. John Wesley’s journals refer to the Derryanvil society.
SourceBelfast News-Letter, 29 June 1945 (pg. 3). 161st anniversary of Derryanvil Methodist church. Digital image online at The British Newspaper Archive, britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2017-07-08, by subscription). Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick.

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"The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there."—Lesley Poles Hartley (1895–1972), The Go-Between (1953).

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© Alison Kilpatrick 2014–2017. All rights reserved.