Deed Poll

Deed Poll. A deed may by one party only is not indented, but polled or shaved quite even, and therfore called a deed-poll, or a single deed.  ...

  A deed-poll is said to be a deed testifying that only one of the parties to the agreement hath put his seal to the same, where such party is the principal or only person, whose consent or act is necessary to the deed: and it is therefore a plain deed, without indenting, and is used when the vendor, for example, only seals, and there is no need of the vendee's sealing a counterpart, because the nature of the contract is such as to require no covenant from the vendee, &c. ...

  All the parts of a deed indented, in judgment of law, make but one entire deed; but every part is of as great force as all the parts together, and they are esteemed the mutual acts of either party, who may be bound by either part of the same, and the words of the indenture are the words of either party, &c. But a deed-poll is the sole deed of him that makes it, and the words thereof shall be said to be his words, and bind him only. ...

Source: Tomlins, Thomas Edlyne. The Law-Dictionary: explaining the Rise, Progress, and Present State, of the English Law, &c. Vol. III. New York and Philadelphia: I. Riley, 1811 (pg. ccix).

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"The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there."—Lesley Poles Hartley (1895–1972), The Go-Between (1953).

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