Doctor Andrew Ledlie of Easton, Pennsylvania

… son of William Ledlie, sen., of Carnan, and Mary Hamilton ...

☛ Please note that text written [within square brackets] contains editorial or explanatory remarks by the compiler/transcriber.

In his book, Physics and Its Practisers in Old Northampton (1900), Charles McIntyre drafted a biographical sketch of Andrew Ledlie, with genealogical notes. Dr. McIntyre admitted that the surviving records were scant and hoped that his outline might serve as basis for developing a fuller biography of Doctor Andrew Ledlie. While many of the entries provided below were extracted from Dr. McIntyre’s book, the Timeline also includes information from many other sources. Whether these, taken in total, are yet sufficient to know the man is debatable.

Timeline:

  • 1763–1768: Andrew Ledlie was the first resident physician of Easton, Pennsylvania. [1]
  • 1770: The 2nd August 1779 edition of the Pennsylvania Gazette recorded the name of Andrew Ledlie in, “A List of Letters, remaining in the Post Office, Philadelphia, July 5, 1770.” [2]
  • 1763: Andrew Ledlie was assessed for tax in Easton as a “single man.” [1]
  • 1767: Andrew Latley was assessed for a house and lot in Easton. [1]
  • 1769–1770: Andrew Ledlie was assessed again as a single man, and the name of William Ledlie also appears in the assessment book for Easton. [1]
  • 1773–1774: Andrew Ledlie, single man, and Joshua Ledlie, merchant, listed in the assessment book for Easton. [1]
  • 1775: Andrew Ledlie, single man, on the assessment list for Easton. [1]
  • 1776-06-28: Dr. Andrew Ledlie occupied Lot no. 79 in what is now 62–67 Center Square in downtown Easton. [3] He went on to acquire the adjacent Lot nos. 78 and 77. In time, Lot nos. 78 and 79 formed the foundation of the Old Post Office Building. [4]
  • 1777-01-18 to 1779-06-30: Doctor Andrew Ledlie was appointed Surgeon to the Twelfth Pennsylvania Regiment, commanded by Col. Wm. Cook. [5]
    ☛ In spite of his service to the cause of Independence, Dr. Ledlie was suspected of being a British sympathizer. He seems to have managed to get through the Revolutionary war period without taking the oath of allegiance.
    [6]
  • 1777-07-18: As the Revolutionary War proceeded, varous committees—of correspondence, inspection (or observation), and safety—were set up which, in effect, wrested control from the colonial authorities. By governing all aspects of the economy, politics, militia, and morality, Committees of safety held considerable sway. As arbiters of good and bad, right and wrong, the committees had the power to overstep their bounds. [7]
       It was in this context, then, that a complaint was made about one Nell Marr, as "a common scold and a common disturber of the Peace of the Town of Easton; and … is aided and abetted in her orderly proceedings by Doctor Andrew Ledlie who has kept her for a housekeeper and Whore for many Years.” [8] The local Committee was not inclined to act, but Dr. Ledlie’s fury drove him to petition the Constitutional Convention, to complain of "great ill-usage by some of the inhabitants of that town (Easton) on account … of his attachment to the cause of liberty.” The Convention elected to defend the Patriots in their midst, and ordered the local magistrate to "afford the petitioner all the redress and security which the nature of this case requires.” [9] ☛ See related entry under date, 1789–1790.
  • 1778-09-17: Andrew Ledlie published an advert in the Philadelphia Packet, seeking the return of Edward M’Kaehill, his Irish servant boy, who had absconded from his service. [10] The lad was mentioned as speaking “bad English,” which suggests that he had the gaeilge. This advert ran, in various forms, as late as September, 1784!
  • 1779: Doctor Ledlie was listed in the assessment book for Easton. [1]
  • 1779-06-28: General Sullivan led an expedition of 2,500 Continentals from Easton to engage with the British Indian allies. [11]
       Of the events of the 28th June 1779, The Wyoming Herald, in a retrospective account of the expedition, wrote:

      Monday, June 28. P.M. news arrived of a family near Carn’s tavern, between this [Wyoming] and Easton, being part of them killed and part of them taken prisoners by the savages.

      Tuesday, June 29—–Early this morning the account we had yesterday was confirmed by the arrival of Mr. Steel, D.C.G. of issues, who says that of the family three women were carried off, and that a son of Dr. Ledlie’s was scalped and tomahawked. The few scattered inhabitants were in great distress, moving for safety to Sullivan’s stores, leaving the principal part of their property behind them. [12]

  • 1779–1782: The United States Board of War appointed Dr. Andrew Ledlie to the post of District Commissioner of Prisoners. This position required him to look after the prisoners of war on parole in Northampton County and also for Sussex County in New Jersey.
       In late 1779 Dr. Ledlie learned of a Hessian stone-mason named Isaac Klinkerfuss, who had moved into Easton about a year earlier, finding work in Valentine Biedleman’s mill. In due course, Mr Klinkerfuss petitioned Robert Levers for a marriage licence. In turn, Mr. Levers notified the Doctor in order to seek his consent, in his capacity as Commissioner, to issue the licence.
       The marriage concluded, Dr. Ledlie brought Mr. Klinkerfuss to Easton, and lodged him in jail, pending confirmation from the Board of War as to the accuracy of his status as a parolee. Dr. Ledlie informed his prisoner that, without papers, he was required to post security or go to jail. In late 1781, security was posted by three men, in the amount of £3,000 Continental money, and Isaac Klinkerfuss was permitted his freedom. However, Klinkerfuss' freedom was  subject to the condition that he apply his stone masonry skills to Dr Ledlie’s house, receiving only board for his pay and continuing to lodge in the jail at night. His wife and friends were not permitted to visit. “The thrifty Doctor rendered an expense account to the Government for over a years’ board and lodging, thereby getting the mason work on his new house without any personal expense.” (Heller, pg 146.)
       Finally, in March 1782, Mr Klinkerfuss and Valentine Beidleman, the friend who had supported him during this difficult episode, attended the office of Justice Robert Levers. In reply to the complaints lodged against him, Dr Ledlie asserted that Mr Klinkerfuss stood indebted to him for £6 for medical treatment; and that he had not promised Klinkerfuss “an exemption from exchange for an American prisoner,” but rather he had written the War Office to advise that several Hessians were living in the district, had married, and wished to remain in Easton, and was awaiting the instructions of the Secretary. Justice Levers prepared a letter to General Lincoln, requesting his permission to release Klinkerfuss from the Easton jail. Dr Ledlie wrote his own letter to the Board of War, alleging injury had been done by Levers to his character.
       Two versions exist for the end of this story. In the first, while Levers proceeded to elevate his correspondence with none less than President William Moore, Dr Ledlie preempted any direction that might have ensued by quietly opening the prison door for Mr Klinkerfuss to join his wife and move on to Philadelphia. (Fox, 2000) In the second, Messrs. Beidleman and Levers are credited with securing the release of Mr. Klinkerfuss through an act of the Committee of Safety and Congress. (Heller, 1911) [13]
    ☛ Indeed, part of Dr. Ledlie’s Hessian-built stone house is thought to survive in the “north rear” portion of the Old Post Office Building at no. 62–67 Centre Square in downtown Easton. In 1790, Dr. Ledlie’s house was thought to have been the best house in the town.
    [14] But at what cost? for as Hellier wrote, “Dr. Ledley lost the respect of the entire community.” [6]
  • 1780: Andrew Ledlie assessed for £468 (Easton). [1]
  • 1781: Doctor Ledlie in the assement book (Easton). [1]
  • 1782: on the list of those who paid a state tax. [1]
  • 1783: Andrew Ledlie, occupation: physician; assessed £40, £120 for his house and lot, and £82 for an office and post of profit; owned two horses and two horned cattle; total valuation, £228 with tax of £2 7s. 6d. [1]
  • 1784-09: On the 7th September the President and The Supreme Executive Council of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania issued a precept to Adam Hay, one of the Constables of the District of the Townships of Easton and Forks in the County of Northampton, and Andrew Ledlie and Jacob Hay, assistants to Mr. Hay, citing that an election held on the 4th September had been declared void, now to hold an election on the 27th September, in order to supply the vacancy occasioned by the expirations of the commissions of John Arndt and Thomas Sillyman, Esqrs. On the day set aside for the election, Andrew Ledlie arrived at the Court House, but refused to attend the Election which, by that action, could not be held.
       In a letter written next day to President Dickson, Robert Levers reported that, on the day of the new election, there had been questions about the reasons for Council having determined the earlier election void; the former inspector, Peter Seip, declined to serve; and when the freeholders set about to choose another inspector, Mr. Ledlie declared that he would not act as assistant. Mr. Ledlie was convinced to await Col. Stephen Balliet, their Representative in Council, who, after he arrived at the Court House, clarified that the former election had been cancelled owing to the poll having closed, then being reopened. In order to allay any misunderstandings which might arise amongst the inhabitants, Council considered it proper to order a new election. Further, Mr. Ledlie considered that the letter authorizing the new election had been in the nature of a private correspondence addressed to Mr. Levers. Thus, he left the Court House “to the great dissatisfaction and disappointment of the most of the Freeholders present who could not forbear, many of them, to declare their indignation against a man who would thus insult his countrymen, affront the Supreme Executive Power of the State, and despise and trample on the Laws of his Country.” [15]
  • 1786: listed in the assessment book for Easton as Phiscioner, and a single man. [1]
  • 1786-12-30: Andrew Ledlie was the administrator for the estate of his brother, Joshua Ledlie, late merchant of Easton. [16]
  • 1787: assessed for a silver butter bowl: one of only four people in Easton who owned any plate. [1]
  • 1787-05-07: Andrew Ledlie chaired a meeting of inhabitants of the town and township of Easton. The subject of the meeting was "the late act of assembly, confirming to the people called Connecticut Claimants, their possessions in the county of Luzerne—together with a copy of the remonstrance agreed to be presented to the honorable the supreme executive council, and of the circular letter of the committee chosen at said meeting. Several townships of this county have adopted the resolutions entered into at Easton; and as a part of the duty of the committee is to notify their fellow-citizens of the danger of so alarming a measure, they have thought it necessary to publish the inclosures, that the circulation of their opinions might be the more extensive.” [17]
     Remonstrance: an earnest presentation of reasons for opposition or grievance, esp. a document formally stating such points. (Merriam-Webster, online at merriam-webster.com, 2019-01-09)
    ☛ Reference to Henry M. Hoyt’s book,
    Brief of a Title in The Seventeen Townships in the County of Luzerne (1879), places this meeting and its object in context, viz.: The Connecticut Claims were “those assertions of title by which the State of Connecticut professed herself to be the owner of a large portion of what…constitute[d] the State of Pennsylvania.” The controversy raged “with great fierceness, evoked strong partisanship, and was urged, on both sides, by the highest skill of statesmen and lawyers. In its origin, it was a controversy over the political jurisdiction and right of soil in a tract of country containing more than five millions of acres of land, claimed by Pennsylvania and Connecticut, as embraced, respectively, in their charter grants. It inolved the lives of hundreds, was the ruin of thousands, and cost the State millions. It wore out one entire generation. It was righteously settled in the end.” [18]
       Ultimately, The Pennsylvania Compromise Law was enacted, resulting in the creation of a board of Commissioners for the examination of Connecticut claims, determination of their veracity, and generation of awards of title. [19]
  • 1789–1790: Andrew Ledlie shot and wounded the Northampton sheriff. Though an explanation for this assault has not survived in the records, the sheriff’s son was one of the accusers in the complaint lodged against the Doctor in 1777. Dr. Ledlie was fined for an assault and battery, which ruling he appealed in December, 1790. [20]
    See related entry under date, 1777-08-18.
  • 1793: Andrew Ladley, doctor, assessment £739. [1]
  • Admitted to the military order of the Cincinnati. [1] [21]
  • In later life, Andrew Ledlie became financially involved, and had to give up his stone house in the centre of town, to a small frame building a short distance away. [6]
  • 1795-01: Death of Doctor Andrew Ledlie. [22]
  • 1796-04-12: Extract of the last will and testament of Andrew Ledlie of Easton, Pennsylvania, written 1st August 1791, proved 12th April 1796:

    411 LEDLIE, Andrew   Easton  "Practitioner of Physic”
    8-1-1791 - 12-4-1796
    - mentions "personal estate in Ireland and elsewhere in Europe”
    - natural son John LEDLIE, alias John BUTLER "least anyone should quible about names" son of Bridget BUTLER
    - ex. and trustees for "old friend and houusekeeper Elinore HUNT" are David CLYMER and Robert TRAILL
    - wit  John TOWNES and Abraham JONES
    - codicil: 31-10-1793
    - sister  Isabella  wife of Rev. George SIMPSON living near Armagh, N. Ireland
    - wit  John MULHOLLAND and J. WALTON
    - Affidavits of James HOLLINSHEAD and Thomas McKEEN Esqrs.
    - "Wm. Craig a fraudulent bankrupt of which proof in abundance are in my desk.”
    - Caveat filed 26-1-1795 by Samuel BOWMAN of Luzerne, Esq. who states that his wife Eleanor the only dau. of Wm. LEDLIE deceased eldest brother of said Dr. Andrew.
    - various signatures to docmts.
    - Thomsas B. DICK of Easton; Hon. John RUK; John MULHOLLEN; John ARNDT; John CURRIE; George IHRIE; James CHESTNOR; John ROSS; Abraham HORN; Samuel SITGREAVES; James RALSTON; Daniel STROUD; Jeff. K. HECKMAN and Peter HOLLINGSHEAD [23]


    ☛ Thus, Andrew Ledlie named as his heirs, his housekeeper, Eleanor (Nell) Hunt, and his natural son, John Ledlie alias Butler. He further directed that the remainder of his estate—after the deaths of either or both Miss Hunt and his son without legal issue—should go to his sister, Isabella Simpson née Ledlie and her husband, the Rev. George Simpson. This latter direction led, after other legal wranglings, to the trial of “Simpson and others against Coon” in the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, conducted on the 4th April 1818. In fine, the Court decided that, on the death of Elinore Hunt without issue, “the moiety of the estate devised to her went immediately to the children of J.S. [Isabella Simpson], to be divided equally among them, in fee simple.” [22]

    ☛ The summary of the case reveals the following additional items:
    ... Towards the end of Andrew Ledlie’s life, his “old friend, companion and house-keeper,” Eleanor Hunt had fallen into a habit of “an unfortunate toxication,” becoming, in the Doctor’s own words, “for the most part insane.” The poor old woman died within days of the Doctor’s passing.
    ... Andrew Ledlie’s natural son was born of Bridget Butler. At the time of the trial (1818), John Ledlie, alias Butler, was living, married, and had issue.

    ☛ The will and codicils reflect the mind and the nature of the man, and make for interesting reading,—for which, see the transcript.

  • Caveat filed by Samuel Bowman, husband of Eleanor, sole daughter of William Ledlie, eldest brother of Andrew. [1]
  • 1796-08-08 to 1797-05-06: Dr. Ledlie's properties were sold in order to settle accounts with his creditors:
    • Lot no. 79, on which stood a frame house and a stone house, sold to John Cooper;
    • Lot no. 78, on the northern part of which stood the Stone House (built largely by Isaac Klinkerfuss), sold to Samuel Sitgreaves; and
    • Lot no. 78, the remainder thereof, and Lot no. 77, on which stood two frame messuages, sold to John Ross. [24]
  • 1807: Owing to Dr. Ledlie’s debts, the estate was still not settled. [25]
    … and which settlement was still a matter of contention as late as 1825:
  • 1825-04-16: The case of Eakin and other against Raub and others was heard by the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. The plaintiffs were James Eakin and James and Ann Simpson, from beyond the sea, who claimed to recover an equal undivided moiety of the premises in dispute, consisting of Lot nos. 77, 78, 79, and 80. Doctor Ledlie claimed possession of no. 79 under a ground rent from the proprietaries, nos. 78 and 77 by improvement, and no. 80 by possession only. Lot nos. 77, 78, and 79 were diposed of, as described under the entry dated, 1796-08-08 to 1797-05-06, above.
       The case had been tried as an action of ejectment in the Court of Common Pleas of Northampton County. In the charge delivered to the jury, it was asserted that,


      It appears that Andrew Ledlie once was a respectable physician in this borough; but towards his latter days, he was much addicted to intoxication, in consequence of which his business declined very much towards the last; that when he got out into taverns and got to drinking, in the language of one of the witnesses, he made his money fly; that he became very much embarrassed in his circumstances. His personal property was quite inconsiderable. Dr. Cooper estimates his household furniture worth one hundred and fifty dollars. There were not many debts due to him. Several of the creditors proceeded to recover their debts, according to a course of law. (pg 331.)
     
    The lower court held that the, while the original statute of limitations gave relief to persons beyond the sea, this provision was repealed by the legislature on the 11th March 1815. Thus, the plaintiffs were placed on the same footing as others, and barred from pursuing a claim that the defendants were in adverse possession. The Supreme Court assigned an error to this point, tried the case, and after citing lengthy arguments, ruled that, “If an act of assembly be a manifest breach of the constitution of the state, it is not only the right, but the duty of the court, to pronounce such act be void.” Consequently, the original judgement was reversed, and a venire facias de novo awarded. (pp 330, 387.) [26]

    ‡ A judicial writ directing that a new jury be impanelled and that a new trial be held, due to some irregularity. (Wiktionary, en.wiktionary.org; accessed 2019-01-09).

    ☛ The names of the plaintiffs—James Eakin, and James and Ann Simpson—elicit some genealogical interest:
         (1) Did James Eakin issue from the first marriage (1776) of Andrew Ledlie’s sister, Isabella, to the Rev. James Aiken of Ballycastle? [27]
         (2) Ann Simpson is known as the eldest daughter of the Rev. George Simpson and Isabella Ledlie. Was James a brother to Ann?

Links:

Sources and notes:

1.

McIntire, Charles. “Andrew Ledlie.” (pp 50–53.) Physic and Its Practisers in Old Northampton. Easton, Penn.: The Chemical Publishing Company, 1900.

2.

The Pennsylvania Gazette, 2 August 1770 (pg 4). “A List of Letters, remaining in the Post-Office, Philadelphia, July 5, 1770. … Andrew Ledlie, Easton.” Digital image online at newspapers.com (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick by subscription, 2019-01-06).

3.

(1) Hope. Richard F. “Address Centre Square 62.” Easton History. Online at www.eastonhistory.com/word/Address-CentreSq062.doc (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2019-01-08). Citing re: 1776: Deed, Thomas Miller to Andrew Ledlie, D4 397 (28 June 1776)(Original Town Lot No. 79; property “in his [Ledlie’s] actual possession being”); accord A.D. Chidsey, Jr., A Frontier Village: Pre-Revolutionary Easton, 234, 255 (Vol. III of Publications of The Northampton County Historical & Genealogical Society 1940). Chidsey indicates he was already occupying the Lot when he bought it. Andrew Ledlie’s name appears on the list of “single men” living in Easton in 1763. McIntire, Physic and Its Practitioners in Old Northampton, supra at 17. See generally Charles de Krafft, Map of Easton Original Town Lots (from the collection of Luigi “Lou” Ferone (“Mr. Easton”) auctioned 27 Feb. 2010, said to have been used by the Penn clerks for notations to keep track of the town lots c.1779-1801)(“ Occupied by Dr. Ledlie  Arrears due”).

4.

(2) Hope. Richard F. “Address Centre Square 62.” Easton History. Online at www.eastonhistory.com/word/Address-CentreSq062.doc (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2019-01-08). Citing re: acquisiton of Lot nos. 78 and 77, and sale of Lot nos. 77–79 to satisfy debts after the death of Andrew Ledlie: Deed Poll, John Craig, Sheriff, to John Cooper, F4 328 (8 Aug. 1796) (writ seizing Original Town Lot No. 79 from the Estate of Andrew Ledlie (deceased) to pay £100 owed to Michael Hart for “nonperformance of a certain promise and assumption by the said Andrew in his lifetime”);  Deed Poll, John Craig, Sheriff, to Samuel Sitgreaves, D2 87 (4 Oct. 1796) (writ seizing Original Town Lot No. 77 and southern part of Lot 78 from Estate of Andrew Ledlie to satisfy debts); Deed Poll, John Craig, Sheriff, to Samuel Sitgreaves, D2 86 (11 Apr. 1797) (writ issued 13 Aug. 1796 to seize “Stone House” and northern part of Original Town Lot 78 to pay damages of £30 14s. against Estate of Andrew Ledlie for “nonperformance of a certain promise and assumption by the said Andrew in his life time to the said George Washington Scott”).

5.

(i) Harvey, Oscar Jewel. A History of Wilkes-Barre, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. Vol. 3. Extract: “Dr. Andrew Ledlie, of Easton, Pennsylvania, whose name is several times mentioned in these pages, was Surgeon of this regiment from January 1, 1777 to June 30, 1779.” Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania: Reader Press, 1927.
(ii) Egle, William Henry, ed.
Journals and Diaries of the War of the Revolution with Lists of Officers and Soldiers. 1775–1783. Citing Andrew Ledlie, Surgeon, Twelth Pennsylvania Regiment, from the 18th January, 1777 (pg 531.) Harrisburg, Pennsylvania: E.K. Meyers, 1893.

6.

Heller, William J. Historic Easton From the Window of a Trolley-Car. Easton, Pennsylvania: Reprinted from a series of articles published in The Pennsylvania-German magazine, 1911. (re: British sympathizer, and also re: Klinkerfusser episode.)

7.

Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. “Committees of safety (American Revolution.” Online at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Committees_of_safety_(American_Revolution) (accessed 2019-01-09).

8.

Riordan, Liam (University of Pennsylvania). Identitiy and Revolution: Everyday Life and Crisis in Three Delaware River Towns. Citing, “Deposition of John Batt, August 18, 1777, NoCC, Misc. Mss. (1767–1778), 193. Digital copy hosted online by Penn State University Libraries, Open Publishing; openpublishing.psu.edu (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2019-01-06).

9.

Fox, Francis S. “Isaac Klinkerfuss.” (pp 137ff.) Sweet Land of Liberty: The Ordeal of the American Revolution in Northampton County, Pennsylvania. University Park, Penn.: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2000.

10.

The Pennsylvania Packet (Philadelphia), 17 September 1778 (pg 1). “Twelve Dollars Reward,” for the return of Edward M’Kaehill, Irish servant boy to Andrew Ledlie of Easton, Pennsylvania. Digital image online at newspapers.com (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick by subscription, 2019-01-06).

11.

Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. “Easton Pennsylvania.” Online at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easton,_Pennsylvania (accessed 2019-01-09).

12.

The Wyoming Herald (Wyoming, Pennsylvania), 3 October 1823 (pg 4). “Extracts from the Journal of a Brigade Chaplain, written in the Campaign of 1779, under Gen. Sullivan. (Continued.)” Citing the attack on a family and the son of Dr. Ledlie at Carn’s tavern, 28th June 1779. Digital image online at ancestry.ca (accessed by subscription, and transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2019-01-07).

13.

(i) Fox, Francis S. “Isaac Klinkerfuss.” (pp 137ff.) Sweet Land of Liberty: The Ordeal of the American Revolution in Northampton County, Pennsylvania. University Park, Penn.: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2000.
(ii) Heller, William J. Historic Easton From the Window of a Trolley-Car. Easton, Pennsylvania: Reprinted from a series of articles published in The Pennsylvania-German magazine, 1911.

14.

Hope. Richard F. “Address Centre Square 62.” Easton History. Online at www.eastonhistory.com/word/Address-CentreSq062.doc (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2019-01-08).

15.

Hazard, Samuel, ed. Pennsylvania Archives. Vol. 10. “In obedience to the within Precept…,” re: election in Easton, September, 1784 (pp. 340–43.) Philadelphia: Joseph Severns & Co., 1854.

16.

The Pennsylvania Gazette (Philadelphia), 1 January 1787 (pg 3). Notice to creditors of the late Joshua Ledlie, published by Andrew Ledlie, administrator. Digital image online at newspapers.com (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick by subscription, 2019-01-06).

17.

The Pennsylvania Packet, 9 June 1787 (pg 3). “Easton, Northampton County, 1787.” Citing Andrew Ledlie, chair of meeting of inhabitants of the town and township of Easton, 7th May 1787; submission of circular of remonstrance, to protest the Connecticut Claimants. Digital image online at www.newspapers.com (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick by subscription, 2019-01-09).

18.

Hoyt, Henry M. Brief of a Title in The Seventeen Townships in the County of Luzerne: A Syllabus of the Controversy Between Connecticut and Pennsylvania. Harrisburgh: Lane S. Hart, 1870.

19.

Munger, Donna Bingham. “Following Connecticut Ancestors to Pennsylvania: Susquehanna Company Settlers.” New England Historical and Genealogical Register. Vol. 139 (April, 1985).

20.

Fox, Francis S. Re: Doctor Andrew Ledlie, Nell Marr, and the Sheriff (pp 50, 184.) Sweet Land of Liberty: The Ordeal of the American Revolution in Northampton County, Pennsylvania. University Park, Penn.: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2000.

21.

Society of the Cincinnati. Organization of the State Society of Pennsylvania, &c. Extract: “Society of the Cincinnati of Pennsylvania. … Surgeons. Andrew Ledlie.” (pg 73.) Philadelphia: C. Sherman, Son & Co., Printers, 1863.

22.

Pennsylvania. Supreme Court. “Simpson and others against Coon.” (4th April 1818.)  Reports of Cases Adjudged in the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. Vol. IV. Philadelphia: Robert Small, 1841 (pp 367–388.)

23.

Eyerman, John. Will Abstracts of Northampton County, PA, 1752–1802. Abstract for “411 LEDLIE, Andrew  Easton  Practitioner of Physic.” Posted to USGenWeb, files.usgwarchives.net/pa/northampton/wills/eyerabst02.txt (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2019-01-07).

24.

(i) Hope. Richard F. “Address Centre Square 62.” Easton History. Online at www.eastonhistory.com/word/Address-CentreSq062.doc (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2019-01-08). Citing re: acquisiton of Lot nos. 78 and 77, and sale of Lot nos. 77–79 to satisfy debts after the death of Andrew Ledlie: Deed Poll, John Craig, Sheriff, to John Cooper, F4 328 (8 Aug. 1796) (writ seizing Original Town Lot No. 79 from the Estate of Andrew Ledlie (deceased) to pay £100 owed to Michael Hart for “nonperformance of a certain promise and assumption by the said Andrew in his lifetime”);  Deed Poll, John Craig, Sheriff, to Samuel Sitgreaves, D2 87 (4 Oct. 1796) (writ seizing Original Town Lot No. 77 and southern part of Lot 78 from Estate of Andrew Ledlie to satisfy debts); Deed Poll, John Craig, Sheriff, to Samuel Sitgreaves, D2 86 (11 Apr. 1797) (writ issued 13 Aug. 1796 to seize “Stone House” and northern part of Original Town Lot 78 to pay damages of £30 14s. against Estate of Andrew Ledlie for “nonperformance of a certain promise and assumption by the said Andrew in his life time to the said George Washington Scott”).
(ii) Hope. Richard F. “Address Centre Square 62.” 
Easton History. Online at www.eastonhistory.com/word/Address-CentreSq062.doc (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2019-01-08). Citing: (i) Deed, John Craig, Sheriff, to John Cooper, F4 328 (8 Aug. 1796) described Lot No. 79 as “being the same lot of ground whereon there are erected, besides other improvements, one frame House, and one Stone House, between the mansion or Dwelling House in which the said Andrew Ledlie died, and ground now occupied or lately occupied by the Widow Everhard.” The “Widow Everhard” at this time did (or had) operated the hotel on Lot No.81 (see Heller, Historic Easton, supra), and Lot No.80 contained stables that presumably serviced her hotel. See Deed, Samuel (Mary) Sitgreaves to John Ross, G2 460 (24 Nov. 1802) (western part of Lot No. 80, containing a “Brick Stable and partly Stone and partly Frame Stable”). (ii) Ledlie’s “Mansion” was evidently the “Stone House” located on the northern part of Lot No. 78. See Deed Poll, John Craig, Sheriff, to Samuel Sitgreavesohn Craig, Sheriff, to Samuel Sitgreaves, D2 86 (11 Apr. 1797). The remainder of the Ledlie property (the southern part of Lot No. 78, and Lot No. 77) contained “Two Frame Messuages” and “a Stone Kitchen”. Deed Poll, J, D2 87 (4 Oct. 1796); see also Deed, Samuel (Mary) Sitgreaves to John RossA Frontier Village: Pre-Revolutionary Easton, D2 88 (6 May 1797) (the whole of Lots Nos. 77 and 78 contained a “Stone dwelling House and Kitchen two frame Messuages and two Lots of Ground”). Since the Easton Sweet Shop Building on Lot No. 77 is today made of brick (not stone, except the basement), it seems likely that this building replaced the two “Frame Messuages”, while the stone “Mansion” on Lot 78, and the additional “Stone House” on Lot No. 79, became the basis of the stone Old Post Office Building that now stands on those lots. (iii) The map in A.D. Chidsey, Jr., , 234–35 (Vol. III of Publications of The Northampton County Historical & Genealogical Society 1940) shows two unjoined buildings on Dr. Ledlie’s property in 1776. However, historian Chidsey shows the doctor’s “Mansion” entirely on Lot No. 79, with nothing on Lot No. 78, contrary to the statements made in the deeds cited above. Historian Chidsey also shows two buildings (presumably the “Frame Messuages”) on Lot No. 77 (the Easton Sweet Shop property).  Chidsey also shows a small shed behind the pair of buildings on Lot No. 77, which may represent the “Stone Kitchen” – although it likely that the kitchen would have served Ledlie’s “Mansion”, which Chidsey appears to omit from his map. 

25.

Hope. Richard F. “Address Centre Square 62.” Easton History. Online at www.eastonhistory.com/word/Address-CentreSq062.doc (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2019-01-08). Citing: Henry F. Marx (ed.), VII Abstracts of Wills of Northampton County 1752 – 1840 73 (Easton Public Library 1935).

26.

Pennsylvania. Supreme Court. “Eakin and others against Raub and others.” (Philadelphia, 16th April 1825.) Reports of Cases Adjudged in the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. Vol. XII. Philadelphia: Thomas Davis, 1846 (pp 330–382.)

27.

Groves, Tenison (c.1863–1938). Groves Mss. Abstract of Armagh Marriage Licence Bond; signed by Rev James Aiken of Ballycastle, county Antrim, clerk, with George Ledlie of Ballygonny, co. Londonderry, linen draper, for the marriage of Rev. Mr. Aiken and Isabella Ledlie of Ballygonny, spinster. Typescript copy held by the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (Belfast), renounced in favour of her son, George Ledlie, also of Ballygonney (29 December 1774). Archival ref. PRONI T808/9159 (transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2017-09-13).

❖          ❖          ❖

© Alison Kilpatrick, 2019. All rights reserved.
Copyright notice

"The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there."—Lesley Poles Hartley (1895–1972), The Go-Between (1953).

Contact   |  Copyright notice  |   Privacy statement   |   Site map

© Alison Kilpatrick 2014–2019. All rights reserved.