James Huggins (c.1776–1860) of Glenarb

Please note that many of the links in the biographical sketch open in new windows. The footnote references are hyperlinked to the Sources section at the bottom of this page.

James Huggins (sometimes Esq., otherwise Mr.) was the second of four sons, and second of ten children of John Huggins (c.1740–1795) and Jean Thompson (d.1826), of Glenarb townland in the parish of Aghaloo, county Tyrone. [1][2] Only a few traces of James Huggins' life survive, but these provide an interesting sketch of an Irish country gentleman of modest means.

When his father died in 1795, James inherited £600. According to a very interesting historical currency converter hosted online by The National Archives (UK), this was a sufficient sum to purchase one of the following: 57 horses, 120 cows, 666 stones of wool, 105 quarters of wheat, or the wages of a skilled tradesman for 4,000 days. [1] In addition, he received rental income from the townlands of Drumacanver and Lisglynn (part) in the parish of Derrynoose, county Armagh. [3] By 1829 (his widowed mother having died in 1826), James held the family acreage in Glenarb townland. [4] He was a gentleman farmer and breeder of horses, [5] probably engaging local day labourers to assist with managing the livestock and raising the crops. In the early nineteenth century, this bundle of capital and income were sufficient for James Huggins to live comfortably and to keep the farm at Glenarb in good working order.

James' wife was Eliza Anne (maiden name unknown and home townland and parish unknown). [6] James and Eliza had one son, James, jun. (d.1849) [7] (and perhaps another; yet to be determined), and a daughter, Anne Jane (1812–1893). [8] James had a natural son, John Joseph, born in 1816 to a Roman Catholic woman whose name and origin are shrouded in mystery.

Of his immediate family, James's eldest brother, John, lived in Dungannon, where he seems to have operated a mercantile concern. His sister, Letitia, had married her second cousin, Huggins Marshall, an attorney, and they were raising a family at Lakeview, near Dungannon. His sister, Mary, had married her first cousin, Samuel Carson Huggins, and they also lived at Dungannon, where they were raising a numerous brood. Eliza Ann and Matilda remained spinsters, and lived in the village of Moy. Jane had married a Mr. Reed, and they appear to have emigrated to the United States sometime before 1825. [9] James's brother, William, made a very successful career as an indigo planter in West Bengal. His youngest brother, Thompson, emigrated to Philadelphia in 1817, not long after John, the eldest brother, was confined as an insolvent debtor—after which episode no trace has been found that brother (John). Neither is anything known about Margaret, the natural daughter of James’s father.

Sometime during the mid to late 1820s, James's own natural child, John Joseph, was delivered to his doorstep in Glenarb, by the relatives of John Joseph's mother. The ensuing several years appear to have been fraught with discord, the young lad disobeying his father, [10] and culminating in the young man’s attestation to the 45th Regiment of Foot at Armagh in 1834. [11]

How much James saw of his son during the next six years is not known, but in October 1840, the 45th regiment was despatched to Belfast. [12] John Joseph was, by then, married: he would have arrived at Belfast with his young wife, Margaret Jane Burke, and their daughter, a toddler named Mary Ann. Though James and his son appear to have parted on disagreeable terms, it is tempting to imagine that they took this opportunity to become reacquainted during this period. James would have been pleased to learn that John Joseph had been promoted to Sergeant on the 1st July. [11]

This familial interval was interrupted in August 1841 when the 45th regiment removed to Dublin. [13] Just six months later, John Joseph was off to muster with the newly re-formed Royal Saint Helena Regiment. [14] Only a few weeks later, James' eldest grandson, his namesake, was born at Winchester. [15] Finally, the regiment embarked for Saint Helena in August. [16] James would not seen his son, and his growing family, for more than seven years.

At home in the parish of Aghaloo, James’s eldest son, James, jun., worked as a weaver and day labourer. [17] James, jun., had married three times and his wives had borne a total of seven children. Four of the five daughters were named Anne or Jane, and only the fourth, Anne Jane (1843–1912) appears to have survived. [18] The three remaining children either did not survive or left Ireland: William (b.1828),[17] Samuel (b.1833),[17] and Margaret (b.1834). [19] In 1849, James Huggins, jun. died in Glenkeen townland in the parish of Aghaloo, aged forty-six years. [20]

In addition to managing the farm at Glenarb and acting as agent for his holdings in Drumacanver and Lisglynn, James Huggins's other business dealings included obtaining a mortgage of £330 from Robert Killen in 1827[21] and, in 1835, a mortgage of £170 from George Jameson for a proportionate part of the yearly rental and fees accruing from the lands held in the parish of Derrynoose. [22]

In 1836, the Townland Valuation (which was a survey done for the purposes of tax assessment) was completed for Glenarb townland. Six land holdings were enumerated and described. Soils ranged from cold clay to sandy and loamy arable, convenient or inconvenient as to roads, arable to meadow, with some of the land liable to flooding from the river Blackwater. Only houses with an annual value of £3 or more were listed. James Huggins's dwelling house and offices (out-buildings) were valued at £6 5s. [23] Aside from parcel no. 1 (please refer to the description in the link “for Glenarb townland," above) which comprised about 30 acres, we do not know how the other five parcels were allocated to other (unnamed) tenants. However, the addition of the first three parcels approximates the 84 acres 3 roods 34 perches held by James Huggins’s mother in 1815. [24] According to the survey map drawn by William Armstrong for the landlord, Sir James Matthew Stronge, Bt., in 1815, the Huggins’s house was situated in the southeastern portion of the townland, very near the western bank of the river Blackwater. [25] 

1832-46-os-map-glenarb-ed2

Click on image to view larger image in the maps section of Arborealis.
Source
 [25].

By the early 1840s, James Huggins was in the latter half of his seventh decade. Nevertheless, he maintained his farming pursuits up to the end of his tenure at Glenarb, as attested by the following newspaper references: [5]

  • 25th August 1845: At the Caledon Farming Society's annual show of live stock, held in the fair green of Caledon, Mr. Huggins won first place premiums in the categories of brood mares, and year-old colts or fillies;
  • 15th November 1845: James Huggins, Esq. attended the annual dinner of the Caledon Estate Farming Society, which took place in Keenan's hotel, Caledon. 
  • 15th June 1846: At the annual show of clover and grasses of the Caledon Estates Farming Society, Mr. James Huggins, Glenarb, won third place in the best Acre category (First Class).
  • November 1846: At the November meeting of the same society, Mr. James Huggins was awarded first place for the best two year-old colt or filly bred by exhibitor, and third place for the best year-old colt or filly bred by exhibitor.

In 1849, both James’s wife, Jane Eliza,[2] and eldest son, James jun., died. [20] His elder sister, Letitia, had died eight years earlier in 1841, [26] and her husband (and James’s cousin), Huggins Marshall (the family’s attorney) of Lakeview near Dungannon, died not long afterwards. [27] His brother-in-law and first cousin, Samuel Carson Huggins (who was born in Maryland just after the American Revolutionary War), died at Dungannon in 1850. [28] His son, John Joseph, was promoted to Colour Sergeant of the St. Helena Regiment in 1848, and had returned to England where he was transferred to the 54th Regiment of Foot and shipped out, with his family, to Fort Henry (now Kingston) in Canada West. John Joseph Huggins was finally pensioned out of the Army in October, 1855, [11] when he and his wife, Margaret Jane, and several children were living in Barnet, Hertfordshire. [29] 

Precisely when James Huggins gave up the farm at Glenarb is not clear. However, he spent his latter years in the household of his daughter. In 1855, Anne Jane Huggins had married somewhat late in life, to John Rodgers who was employed as herd by the second Earl of Caledon. [30] John Rodgers maintained a household in one-half of an estate workers’ cottage, designed as an adjoined townhouse, in Derrykintone townland, near the western gatehouse of Caledon estate. [31] 

1860-derrykintone-gv-ed2-mini

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Source
 [31].

The dwelling house was a rural townhouse or adjoined duplex format, built in the early 1800s to house two estate workers and their families. Today, the two cottages are known as Beattie's Cottage and Robertson’s Cottage, self-catering accommodations let by the Caledon Estate. It isn’t clear which of these, Beattie’s or Robertson’s, was cottage no. 1(a) in 1860.

derrykintone-cottage-OSref1-2003-ed3

Caledon Estate workers’ cottages in Derrykintone, county Tyrone.
Photograph © Alison Kilpatrick 2003. All rights reserved.

… now known as Beattie’s Cottage and Robertson’s Cottage,
after restoration by the Caledon Estate.
One side of this cottage was the home of John Rodgers (1808–1913)
and Anne Jane Huggins (1812–1893), his wife.

James Huggins died in Derrykintone on the 28th August 1860, in his eighty-fifth year. [32] His body was buried in Caledon churchyard, the gravestone bearing the following inscription: [2]

Sacred to the memory of

JAMES and JANE ELIZA HUGGINS

who died in the years 1849 and 1869 [sic]

Who both lie in this graveyard

The memory of the just is blessed

James Huggins of Glenarb was survived by:

  • his daughter, Anne Jane Rodgers née Huggins (1812–1893) of Derrykintone; [33]
  • his son, John Joseph Huggins (1816–1876), then of Barnet, Hertfordshire;
  • his sisters, Eliza Anne (c.1781–1861) [34] and Matilda (c.1787–1876), both spinsters, living in the village of Moy; [35]
  • his sister, Mary Huggins (c.1779–1865) of Dungannon; [36] and
  • his brother, William H. Huggins (c.1790–1868), [37] a retired indigo planter residing in Belvidere cottage in Ballyaughlis townland, near Lisburn.

The last will and testament [38] was proved on 24 November 1860. In this document, which was written on the 26th September 1858, James Huggins stated that he was formerly of Glenarb, parish of Aghaloo and county of Tyrone, but then residing in Derricantane [sic] of the same parish. Letters of administration were granted to his brother, William Huggins, then of London, “one of the Joint Universal Devizees.” According to the Calendar of Wills, the personal effects were valued at less than £20 at the time of death. However, this did not include Mr. Huggins's freehold interest in parts of the townlands of Drumacanver and Lisglynn in the parish of Derrynoose, county Armagh.

Mr. Huggins directed that all his real and personal property should fall to his brother, William, and to Joseph Girvin of Caledon (a near relative) upon the following trusts, that is, to raise off his lands in Lisglynn townland in the parish of Derrynoose and county of Armagh, sufficient funds:

  • to pay all his debts, testamentary, and funeral expenses;
  • to erect an enclosure around the burying ground of his father, John Huggins;
  • to apply the interest or the annual proceeds from the townland of Lisglynn (in the parish of Derrynoose, county Armagh) amongst his sisters, Mary of Dungannon and Elizabeth Ann and Matilda of Moy, and Anne Jane Rodgers (his daughter), wife of John of Derrecantone, in equal shares during their lifetimes;
  • after the last death of his last surviving sisters, to apply their joint share of rental income to John [Joseph] Huggins then of Barnet, Hertfordshire, and the freehold interest in the lands held in Lisglynn, in trust for John’s son, James Edward Huggins; and
  • after the death of his daughter, Anne Jane Rodgers, to apply her share of the rental income also to John Joseph Huggins, in trust for his son, James Edward, so that Mr. Huggins’s portion of the lands in Lisglynn would descend to young James Edward forever.

The will was witnessed by Chas Todd Huston, M.D., of Tynan, and Charles Wilson of Caledon.

Postscript:—A visit to the churchyard in Caledon confirms that the enclosure was erected around the grave of James Huggins’s parents. Beyond that, it appears that his last wishes did not transpire as he’d hoped. In 1866, his share in the lands of Drumacanver and Lisglynn were sold through the Encumbered Estates Court to a Mr. Alexander M’Calley, for the rather tidy sum of £1,000. [39]

James’s sisters Eliza Anne and Mary died in 1861 and 1865, respectively; his brother, William, in 1868; and his last surviving sibling, Matilda, in 1876. Eliza Anne directed all of her estate to her brother; [40] William died a wealthy man and named as his beneficiaries his nieces and nephews, however omitting the name of James Edward Huggins. [41] Matilda made similar bequests to nieces and nephews, including Anne Jane Rodgers née Huggins. Again, notably absent from the list of beneficiaries were the names of those nieces and nephews who were the children of John Joseph Huggins. [42]

Either James Huggins had left a trail of considerable debt that needs must be satisfied, or concerted and collective efforts had been made in order to divert young James Edward Huggins’s proportion to other near relatives.

Other references:

  • November, 1786: Caledon Estate rent roll – Wm. Thompson in Creivelaught townland, parish of Aghaloo; rent charge: £15 15s 9-1/2d.; notes: 3 Lives [consisting of] 2 Royal family & J’s [James] Huggins 2’d Son to Jn’o Huggins; from November, 1786. [43]

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Links:

Sources and notes:

1.

(a) Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (Belfast). Copy will of John Huggins, Glenarb, county Tyrone (probate granted 8 July 1795). Archival ref. PRONI D889/1/41B (transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick at the PRONI, Nov. 2003).
(b) According to one historical currency converter, £600 in 1795 was equivalent to US$77,189 in 2019. Source: Eliasen, Alan. Historical Currency Conversions. Calculator online at futureboy.us/fsp/ (accessed 2019-06-04).
(c) The Currency Converter: 1270–2017, hosted online by The National Archives (UK), calculates the value of £600 in the year, 1800,‡ to equal about £26,444 in 2017. Further, the converter measures purchasing power: in 1800, £600 would have been sufficient to pay for one of the following: 57 horses, 120 cows, 666 stones of wool, 105 quarters of wheat, or the wages of a skilled tradesman for 4000 days. 
Online at www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/currency-converter/ (accessed 2019-06-04). ‡ The converter works in ten-year increments until the year, 1900.

2.

Wylie, Mona, and George Wylie, compilers. "Gravestone Inscriptions: Churchyard of St. John's Caledon.” Inscription: Sacred to the memory of / JOHN HUGGINS / of Glenarb / who died July 1795 / and of his wife / JANE HUGGINS / who died in 1826 / And their children / who lie buried here / Erected by their son James Huggins.” In, Dúiche Néill: Journal of the O Neill Country Historical Society. Vol. I, No. 3 (1988).

3.

Armagh Guardian, 22 April 1864. "Landed Estates Court, Ireland," re: William Huggins, executor for James Huggins, deceased, sale of lands in Drumacanver and Lisglin, co. Armagh. Online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.british-newspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed 2015-11-19).

4.

Strabane Morning Post, 29 March 1830. “A LIST of Notices which have been served on the Clerk of the Peace, by persons who intend applying to Register Freeholds, pursuant to the 10th Geo. 4th. Chap. 8, at the ensuing General Quarter Sessions of the Peace, to be held at Dungannon, on the 6th day of January next, 1830, and at Strabane, on the 15th day of January next, 1830;” citing the name of James Huggins of Clenarbe [Glenarb]; followed by a similar entry on 29th March 1830 for James Huggins of Glenarb in the Barony of Dungannon. Extract by Alison Kilpatrick from a microfilm copy (purchased from the British Library, 2004).

5.

(a) Newry Telegraph, 20 August 1830 (pg. 4). “Tynan Branch—N.E. Farming Society.” Citing the award of a premium to Mr. Huggins for the best rood in clover. Digital image online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed by subscription, and transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2019-06-03).
(b) Northern Whig, 30 August 1845. "Caledon Farming Society's Cattle Show." Citing premiums awarded to many farmers including a 1st place to Mr. Higgins [sic] in the brood mares category, and 1st for year-old colts and fillies. Digital image online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed by subscription, and transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2015-11-18).
(c)
Armagh Guardian, 18 November 1845 (pg. 3). “Caledon Estate Farming Society.” Citing the attendance of James Huggins, Esq., at  the annual dinner of the Caledon Estate Farming Society, at Keenan’s hotel in Caledon. Transcript from microfilm copy purchased by Alison Kilpatrick from The British Library (2004).
(d)
Armagh Guardian, 30 June 1846 (pg. 3). “Caledon Estates Farming Society.” Citing the award of 3rd prize to Mr. James Huggins of Glenarb in the category for best Acre. Transcript from microfilm copy purchased by Alison Kilpatrick from The British Library (2004).
(e)
Tyrone Constitution, 4 December 1846 (pg. 1). "Caledon Estates Farming Society." Citing premiums awarded to many farmers, including 1st place to Mr. James Huggins for best two-year-old colt or filly bred by the exhibitor, and 3rd place for best year-old colt or filly bred by the exhibitor. Digital image online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed by subscription, and transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2015-11-19).

6.

Wylie, Mona, and George Wylie, compilers. "Gravestone Inscriptions: Churchyard of St. John's Caledon.” Inscription: "Sacred to the memory of / JAMES and JANE ELIZA HUGGINS / who died in the years 1849 [sic] and 1869 [sic] / Who both lie in this graveyard / The memory of the just is blessed.” In, Dúiche Néill: Journal of the O Neill Country Historical Society. Vol. I, No. 3 (1988).

7.

A record has not been found which neatly ties James Huggins (d.1849) to James Huggins (d.1860) of Glenarb. However, in his family history notes, written in 1962, John Alfred Huggins (great grandson to James Huggins of this sketch) of Toronto (1896–1962) stated that his grandfather, John Joseph Huggins (1816–1876), was the youngest son of James. The younger James lived in Kedew (previously held by John Huggins d.1795), the Dyan, Caledon, and Glenkeen (held by Marshall cousins). On balance, it appears that this man was our subject’s elder son.

8.

Civil Registration of Marriage, Ireland. John Rodgers, full age, bachelor, herd, resident at Caledon House, son of John Rodgers, farmer. Anne Jane Huggins, full age, spinster, resident of Caledon, daughter of James Huggins, Gent. Marriage solemnised in the parish church of Caledon (Church of Ireland) William B. Armstrong, by licence, 12th November 1855; witnesses: Charles Wilson, Thomas W. Managh(?). Original record: General Register Office, Ireland (Dublin). Archival ref. GRO ref. vol. 1, pg. 224. Microfilm copy held by the Family History Library of Salt Lake City, Utah, USA (FHL film no. 101362); transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick 2003-04-02.

9.

State of Ohio (USA). Deaths and Burials, 1854–1997. Thomas J. Reid, born at Pittsburgh, died 17 March 1880, at Portsmouth, Scioto County, Ohio; son of — Reid and Jane Hugins. Original record: Death records, 1856-1908, Probate court (Scioto County). Digital image hosted online by the Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA, at www.familysearch.org (ref. indexing batch no. B07523-7, ref. no. v1 p164; FHL film no. 292722); (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2012-02-20).

10.

Family history notes prepared by John Alfred Huggins (1896-1962), for his niece, Mary E. Brandum née Huggins (1926–2007), March 1962; held privately, and shared with Alison Kilpatrick (2015-01-25). These notes mention a second wife, a Roman Catholic, who took her child (John Joseph Huggins) back to Denmark. From his memory of what his father (Samuel John Huggins, 1864–1922) had recounted, Mr. J.A. Huggins recalled the name of John Joseph Huggins’ mother as Sylvia? Ackerman? [sic].

11.

British Army. Service Record for John Huggins of Caledon (born c.1816). Regimental no. 2841. Photocopies of images obtained from The National Archives (Kew, England) through research commissioned by Alison Kilpatrick (2002) from Dr. Christopher Watts, British military research specialist. Archival ref. PRO ref. WO97/1555.

12.

London Standard, 29 August 1840; Vindicator, 28 October 1840; and, Manchester Courier, 31 October 1840. Digital images online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick, by subscription).

13.

Freeman’s Journal, 4 August 1841; and Dublin Morning Register, 4 August 1841. Digital images online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick, by subscription).

14.

Freeman’s Journal, 2 February 1842. Digital image online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick, by subscription).

15.

(a) General Register Office (UK). Index of Civil Registrations of Births, England. James Edward Huggins; 1st quarter ending 31 March 1842; Winchester RD, Hampshire; vol. 7, pg. 237. Original record held by the General Register Office. Digital images online at FreeBMD www.freebmd.org.uk (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2013-02-01). (b) Roman Catholic Church. Parish of Newport, Isle of Wight, Hampshire. Baptism of James Edward Huggins, son of John Huggins and Margaret Burke, 10th April 1842; International Genealogical Index, batch no. C061571, film no. 1037048. Digital image of record hosted online by the Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA, www.familysearch.org.

16.

London Standard, 8 August 1842; and Hampshire Advertiser, 3 December 1842. Digital images online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick, by subscription).

17.

(a) Church of Ireland. St. John’s parish church, Caledon, parish of Aghaloo, county Tyrone. Baptism: William Huggins, 26 July 1829, son of James and Isabella Huggins of Kedue [Kedew, parish of Aghaloo], occupation of father: Weaver. Copy on microfilm held by the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (Belfast), PRONI ref. MIC/1/326. Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, 4 September 2017.
(b) Church of Ireland. St. John’s parish church, Caledon, parish of Aghaloo, county Tyrone. Baptism: Samuel Huggins, 8 September 1833, daughter of James and Mary Ann [sic] Huggins of Dion [Dyan, parish of Aghaloo], occupation of father: Labourer. Copy on microfilm held by the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (Belfast), PRONI ref. MIC/1/326. Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, 4 September 2017.

18.

Church of Ireland. St. John’s parish church, Caledon, parish of Aghaloo, county Tyrone. Baptism: Anne Jane, daughter of James Huggins & Jane, of Glenkeen, Farmer, born 1 May 1843, baptised 7 May, 1843. Copy on microfilm held by the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (Belfast), PRONI ref. MIC/1/326. Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, 4 September 2017.

19.

Church of Ireland. St. John’s parish church, Caledon, parish of Aghaloo, county Tyrone. Baptism: Margaret Huggans, 7th December 1834, daughter of James and Mary Ann [sic] Huggans of Dion [Dyan, parish of Aghaloo], occupation of father: Labourer. Copy on microfilm held by the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (Belfast), PRONI ref. MIC/1/326. Transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, 4 September 2017.

20.

Church of Ireland. St. John’s parish church, Caledon, parish of Aghaloo, county Tyrone. Burial: James Huggins of Glenkeen, aged 46 years, 26th February 1849. Copy on microfilm held by the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (Belfast), PRONI ref. MIC/1/326; reviewed and transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, 4 September 2017.

21.

Registry of Deeds, Ireland. Memorial no. 826-143-555678: Huggins to Killen (dated 13 June 1827; registered 14 July 1827). Microfilm copy held by the Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA (FHL film no. 468423). Digital images online at www.familysearch.org (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2019-06-03).

22.

Registry of Deeds, Ireland. Memorial no. 1835-25-158: Huggins to Jameson (dated 26 September 1835; registered 27 September 1835). Microfilm copy held by the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (Belfast); archival ref. MIC/311/782 (accessed and extract by Alison Kilpatrick, 2019-06-03).

23.

Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (Belfast). Townland Valuation: Glenarb, Parish of Aghaloo, Barony of Dungannon Lower, 7th January 1836. Archival ref. PRONI ref. VAL/1/B/66B (transcribed by Alson Kilpatrick, Oct. 2003).

24.

Armstrong, William. A Survey of Glenarb, the Property of Sir James Matthew Stronge, Bar't, by William Armstrong. (1815) Held by the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (Belfast). Archival ref. PRONI D2433/A/13/9/1 (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2017-10-12).

25.

Map of Glenarb Townland (1836). Source: Ordnance Survey of Northern Ireland. OSNI Historical First Edition (1832–1846). Digital image online at https://appps2.spatialni.gov.uk; accessible via the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland’s "PRONI Historical Maps Viewer" (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2019-06-03). Adapted to enhance the clarity of the image, and to point out the river Blackwater on the eastern boundary of Glenarb townland, name the neighbouring townlands, and identify the location of the hosue occupied by James Huggins (c.1776–1860) in the southeastern portion of the townland. © Alison Kilpatrick 2019. All rights reserved.

26.

Belfast News-Letter, 28 December 1841. Death notice: “Died. On the 17th inst. at Lakeview, near Dungannon, in the 66th year of her age, after a lingering illness, Letitia, wife of Huggins Marshall, Esq. Attorney, who has left a large family and a numerous circles [sic] of relatives to mourn her loss.” Digital image online in the Gale News database (accessed by subscription, and transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2008-08-19).

27.

Armagh Guardian, 8 June 1847 (pg. 3, col. 2). Marriage notice: “May 24, in the Presbyterian Meeting-house, Carland, Letitia, youngest daughter of the late Huggins Marshall, Esq., Solicitor, Dungannon, to Samuel Morrow, jun., Esq., Kilmaslee.” Transcript from microfilm purchased by Alison Kilpatrick from The British Library (2004).

28.

Armagh Guardian, 5 August 1850. Death notice: "Died.—July 30, at his residence, Dungannon, Samuel C. Huggins, sen., Esq." Transcribed from the microfilm copy purchased by Alison Kilpatrick from The British Library (2003).

29.

General Register Office (UK). Certified Copy of an Entry of Birth, given at the General Register Office. Sarah Selina Huggins, born 29 December 1855; daughter of John Huggins, Staff Serjeant, Royal Middlesex Rifles, and Margaret Huggins formerly Burke; registered 22 January 1856, informant: John Huggins, father, 15, The Barracks, Barnet, South Mimms; Barnet Registration District, South Mims Sub-district, Counties of Middlesex and Hertfordshire. Purchased by Alison Kilpatrick from the Barnet Register Office, Edgware (branch of the General Register Office, 2002-04-08 (GRO ref. application no. CM329753. registration no. CM 329753).

30.

General Register Office, Ireland. Civil Registration of a Marriage. John Rodgers, full age, bachelor, herd, resident at Caledon House, son of John Rodgers, farmer. Anne Jane Huggins, full age, spinster, resident of Caledon, daughter of James Huggins, Gent. Marriage solemnised in the parish church of Caledon (Church of Ireland) William B. Armstrong, by licence, 12th November 1855; witnesses: Charles Wilson, Thomas W. Managh(?). Original record: General Register Office, Ireland (Dublin). Archival ref. GRO ref. vol. 1, pg. 224. Microfilm copy held by the Family History Library of Salt Lake City, Utah, USA (FHL film no. 101362); transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2003-04-02.

31.

Griffith, Richard. General Valuation of Rateable Property in Ireland. Parish of Aghaloo, Union of Dungannon, County of Tyrone. Valuation table and Ordnance Survey map of Derrykintone townland, parish of Aghaloo, county Tyrone (7th April 1860). Ordnance Survey (OS) sheet no. 67 (co. Tyrone), said survey conducted under the supervision of Sir Richard Griffiths. Original record: Ordnance Survey Office, Dublin, Ireland. Digital image from AskAboutIreland.ie (accessed 2019-06-04), Copyright © AskAboutIreland.ie. Adapted by Alison Kilpatrick to to enhance the image for clarity; highlight the holding of John Rodgers (OS map ref. no. 1), herd to the second Lord Caledon; and identify the river Blackwater which forms the boundary with the counties of Monaghan and Armagh.

32.

Belfast News-Letter (BNL), 1 September 1860. Death notice for James Huggins, Glenarb, county Tyrone; finding aid: card index, Linen Hall Library, Belfast, Northern Ireland (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick, Nov. 2003); confirmed to 1860-09-01 edition of BNL, viz.: “August 28, at his residence, near Caledon, James Huggins, Esq., formerly of Glenarb, aged 84 years.”

33.

Belfast News-Letter, 9 January 1883. Death notice: "Rodgers—January 6, at Kedew Farm, Dyan, Caledon, Ann Jane, wife of John Rodgers, aged 80 (?) years. Her remains will be removed for interment in Caledon Church Burying-ground, this (Monday) morning, at eleven o’clock." Digital image online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick 2008-03-21, by subscription).

34.

Belfast Morning News, 19 April 1861, pg. 2. Death notice: “April 14 [1861], at Moy, Miss Eliza Ann Huggins, third daughter of the late John Huggins, Esq., of Glenarb, county Tyrone, aged 80 years.” Digital image online at The British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick 2013-07-07, by subscription).

35.

Belfast News-Letter, 24th July 1876 (pg. 2). “Statutory Notice to Creditors.” Citing the goods of Matilda Huggins, late of no. 1 University Street, Belfast, who died 2nd April 1876; published by her solicitor, Henry J. Harris of Portadown, county Armagh. Digital image online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed by subscription, and transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2008-03-21).

36.

General Record Office of Northern Ireland (GRONI, Belfast). Civil Registration of a Death. Mary Huggins, died 1st October 1865, present at the death: Jane Huggins. Archival ref. Dungannon registration district, county Tyrone, Vol. 17, p. 621; transcript by Alison Kilpatrick from the copy held at the GRONI (Nov., 2003).

37.

Belfast News-Letter, 13 March 1868. Death notice: "Died.—Huggins—March 10, at Belvidere Cottage, Drumbeg, William Huggins, Esq. His remains will be removed for interment in Drumbeg Church-yard, on to-morrow (Saturday), at twelve o’clock noon. Friends will please accept this intimation." Digital image online at The British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed by subscription, and transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2008-03-21).

38.

Huggins, James. Last Will and Testament. Dated 26th September 1858; proved 24th November 1860. Held by the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (Belfast). Archival ref. MIC/15C/1/1, pp. 575-6 (transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, November, 2003).

39.

(a) Belfast News-Letter, 30 November 1866. “Landed Estates Court.” Citing a legal notice of the sale of the late James Huggins’s interest in the fee-farm grant of 51 acres 2 roods 36 perches, statute measure, in Drumacanver townland, parish of Derrynoose; published by Messrs. Cunningham & Johnson, solicitors; sold to Mr. Alexander M’Calley for £1000. Digital image online at the British Newspaper Archive, www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk (accessed by subscription, and transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, 2008-03-21).
(b) Great Britain. House of Commons. Accounts and Papers. Session 5 February – 21 August 1867. Vol. LIX (1867). “Landed Estates Court (Ireland). Return of the Net Annual Value of each Lot set up for Sale in the Landed Estates Court during the Years 1865 and 1866; specifying the Quantity of Land in each Lot, and the Counties in which the Lands are Situated.” Extract: “Estate: Executor, Huggins; Lot: One lot; Quantity: 51A. 2R. 36P.; Annual value: £45 12s. 0d.; County: Armagh.” (pg. 21.) 

40.

Huggins, Eliza Ann. Last Will and Testament. Dated 10th March 1851; codicil dated 10th September 1856; proved 30th April 1861. Held by the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (Belfast). Archival ref. MIC/15C/2, pg.18 (transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, November, 2003).

41.

Huggins, William. Last Will and Testament. Dated 24th September 1866; codicil dated 15th February 1868; proved 1st May 1868. Held by the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (Belfast). Archival refs. MIC/15C/1/3,  MIC/15C/2/8, .../10 (pp. 19–28); file no. 1866 (144); transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, November, 2003.

42.

Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (Belfast). Last will and testament of Matilda Huggins; PRONI ref. No. 99/T.BEL, 29 March 1876; accessed at the PRONI and transcribed by Alison Kilpatrick, October 2001. Will Calendars index entry online at apps.proni.gov.uk: Matilda Huggins, died 1 April 1876, date of grant: 22 May 1876, effects under £450, Belfast Registry, abstract: “The will of Matilda Huggins, late of University-street, Belfast, Spinster, deceased, who died 1 April 1876 at Belfast, was proved at Belfast by the oath of Henry James Harris of Portadown, County Armagh, Solicitor, the sole Executor.”

43.

Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI, Belfast). Rent Roll of Caledon Estate for May 1807. Citing William Thompson of Crievelaught townland, parish of Aghaloo. Archival ref. PRONI D2433/A/6/7/1 (accessed by Alison Kilpatrick, 12 October 2017).

This page was updated 7th June 2019, in the “Other References" section (life in Thompson of Creevelough lease).

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"The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there."—Lesley Poles Hartley (1895–1972), The Go-Between (1953).

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